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Author Topic: Flea market Finds  (Read 277404 times)
Markofthetower
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markofthetower
« Reply #200 on: June 16, 2009, 05:30:50 am »

I figured I'd throw my contributions in for my few finds.  I've only been out hunting once, but I'm fairly content with what I came across this first time around. (Note: The Tucson Swap Meet is not an ideal location for acquiring Victorianesque items.)

This old clock (and music box) came in at 17$.  Based on the rusting, I'm guessing it's about a 14ga. steel case.  The actual age of the clock is unknown to me, but, my uneducated guess puts it in the 40's maybe.  It measures about 7" tall, 4.5" wide, and 3" deep.

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This second item is what I believe to be a traveling ash tray.  It was shiny, operable and only a quarter.  I figured that it could be used for something eventually.

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Side note: If anyone has any recommendations of how to approach a restoration or adaptation for the clock, I'd be happy to hear them Smiley
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maduncle
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« Reply #201 on: June 16, 2009, 11:43:53 am »

Here are the gears I harvested from my yard sale clock, an old Sessions 8 day Providence mantle clock. The larger gears are 3" across, it's quite a nice haul. Even better, I will actually wind up with a working mantle clock. I'm going to install an electric motor in the old case and use the original face and arms. The gear clock would never have worked, so now I'll not only have a working clock, but a great collection of brass parts.




Good bunch of gears there in shiny condition.

They look remarkably similar to a set I just salvaged from an old clock, although mine don't look shiny.

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WillRockwell
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« Reply #202 on: June 16, 2009, 02:53:01 pm »

I figured I'd throw my contributions in for my few finds.  I've only been out hunting once, but I'm fairly content with what I came across this first time around. (Note: The Tucson Swap Meet is not an ideal location for acquiring Victorianesque items.)

This old clock (and music box) came in at 17$.  Based on the rusting, I'm guessing it's about a 14ga. steel case.  The actual age of the clock is unknown to me, but, my uneducated guess puts it in the 40's maybe.  It measures about 7" tall, 4.5" wide, and 3" deep.



This second item is what I believe to be a traveling ash tray.  It was shiny, operable and only a quarter.  I figured that it could be used for something eventually.



Side note: If anyone has any recommendations of how to approach a restoration or adaptation for the clock, I'd be happy to hear them Smiley


watch this video, it will show you what to look for in judging the condition of your clock. Bottom line, if the bushings are shot, salvage the gears.

Your ashtray could be the mount for a gauge.
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clockdug
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« Reply #203 on: June 16, 2009, 03:11:07 pm »

Or learn how to put in a bushing and stop destroying antiques. 

It's easy; takes little in the way of hand tools and for $1.50 in bushings you can restore the movement in one evening. 
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Moonracer
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« Reply #204 on: July 07, 2009, 04:42:53 am »

A lovely little pretty I found at my local flea market this weekend, cost me $20.00 and has a year on the back of it that reads 1910, also has a makers hallmark so I'll have to see what I can dig up about the maker. Its not magnetic so it's not colored steel so I'm thinking brass and the stone may be garnet, or at least a lookalike garnet.

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MadMadamMim
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« Reply #205 on: July 07, 2009, 04:25:29 pm »

I got this slightly sinister thing a couple of weeks ago at camden market which i'm very excited about but have virtually no idea what to do with. Its part of a machine for inflicting treating people with electroshock therapy. It looks approx 1960s at a guess. It is wood under the black plastic covering, so i think i'll peel that off and sand/dye/varnish the wood to shiny victorian mahoggany lustre. other than that i'm not really clear yet.
(slightly closer up)

I love the fact it has a switch marked 'Patient'. All its missing is one marked 'Thunderstorm' and another marked 'Igor, release the kite!'.
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« Reply #206 on: July 07, 2009, 11:02:32 pm »

Great items......the railway share is particularly nice(any chance of getting a photo without flash?)


I will try Smiley

http://img98.imageshack.us/img98/5615/cimg0973hr1.jpg

here Smiley


What are the chances you could put his in a flat bed scanner and email me a link to the high res image?

I would like to make a few to frame for my friends as gifts.
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pewtersmith
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« Reply #207 on: July 07, 2009, 11:24:35 pm »

Or learn how to put in a bushing and stop destroying antiques. 

It's easy; takes little in the way of hand tools and for $1.50 in bushings you can restore the movement in one evening. 

I would somewhat disagree , 90% of the broken mantel and wall clocks  are not worth the $1.50 ( and cost less than that new ) much less the time and effort to repair , However a few minutes of research to be sure the clock is not unique or of value is a must ( this applies to typewriters , cameras etc.) . To preserve a poorly make cheap clock just because it's old makes no sense , giving it a rebirth as art is down right noble. Give on to History that which is History's and recycle the rest.
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darkshines
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« Reply #208 on: July 07, 2009, 11:26:13 pm »

I found this at a yard sale the other day, and apparently theres still cologne in it.. Sorry for the picture quality, my camera phones no the best.





I'm probably just going to dump the cologne,(it's very pungent due to age) and permantly connect the two pieces for use as a prop.




I HAVE THAT EXACT SAME COLOGNE GUN!!!!1! Cheesy
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« Reply #209 on: July 07, 2009, 11:50:59 pm »

I got this slightly sinister thing a couple of weeks ago at camden market which i'm very excited about but have virtually no idea what to do with. Its part of a machine for inflicting treating people with electroshock therapy. It looks approx 1960s at a guess. It is wood under the black plastic covering, so i think i'll peel that off and sand/dye/varnish the wood to shiny victorian mahoggany lustre. other than that i'm not really clear yet.
(slightly closer up)


Now that is a find. If the coil is OK then you have scored a bargain (assuming that you were not overcome a tthe sight of it in the market and handed over all your cash!). Even if the coild is not working it is usually the connection of the coil wire to it's binding post. Only if someone has put far more current into the coil than they should have is there any danger of the coil being shorted out. These things are quite robust.

The two knobs marked 'Patient' are where you attach the electrode leads for the electro-shock or glass tube attachments that you are using. Though from the age (1950s - 1960s) it's more likely to be for ECT than the 'violet wand' therapies.

Still, you could run Geissler or Crooke's tubes off the output, which is fun!
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« Reply #210 on: July 08, 2009, 04:32:16 am »

I got this slightly sinister thing a couple of weeks ago at camden market which i'm very excited about but have virtually no idea what to do with. Its part of a machine for inflicting treating people with electroshock therapy. It looks approx 1960s at a guess. It is wood under the black plastic covering, so i think i'll peel that off and sand/dye/varnish the wood to shiny victorian mahoggany lustre. other than that i'm not really clear yet.
(slightly closer up)


Now that is a find. If the coil is OK then you have scored a bargain (assuming that you were not overcome a tthe sight of it in the market and handed over all your cash!). Even if the coild is not working it is usually the connection of the coil wire to it's binding post. Only if someone has put far more current into the coil than they should have is there any danger of the coil being shorted out. These things are quite robust.

The two knobs marked 'Patient' are where you attach the electrode leads for the electro-shock or glass tube attachments that you are using. Though from the age (1950s - 1960s) it's more likely to be for ECT than the 'violet wand' therapies.

Still, you could run Geissler or Crooke's tubes off the output, which is fun!


My inner Lovejoy is whispering 1940s, or perhaps even late 1920s — Bakelite (phenol formaldehyde) and vinyl (polyvinyl chloride) both date commercially to the early/mid-1920s. Also, I see a spring-clip on the inside of the lid which would be exactly the place to store a "violet wand."

Is there a manufacturer's plate on it anywhere?

Also, I would seriously hesitate to peel off the vinyl until I knew exactly what I had, and what it might be worth (either monitarily, or just semi-historically) in relatively-original condition.
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MadMadamMim
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« Reply #211 on: July 08, 2009, 10:12:29 am »

I got this slightly sinister thing a couple of weeks ago at camden market which i'm very excited about but have virtually no idea what to do with. Its part of a machine for inflicting treating people with electroshock therapy. It looks approx 1960s at a guess. It is wood under the black plastic covering, so i think i'll peel that off and sand/dye/varnish the wood to shiny victorian mahoggany lustre. other than that i'm not really clear yet.
(slightly closer up)


Now that is a find. If the coil is OK then you have scored a bargain (assuming that you were not overcome a tthe sight of it in the market and handed over all your cash!). Even if the coild is not working it is usually the connection of the coil wire to it's binding post. Only if someone has put far more current into the coil than they should have is there any danger of the coil being shorted out. These things are quite robust.

The two knobs marked 'Patient' are where you attach the electrode leads for the electro-shock or glass tube attachments that you are using. Though from the age (1950s - 1960s) it's more likely to be for ECT than the 'violet wand' therapies.

Still, you could run Geissler or Crooke's tubes off the output, which is fun!


My inner Lovejoy is whispering 1940s, or perhaps even late 1920s — Bakelite (phenol formaldehyde) and vinyl (polyvinyl chloride) both date commercially to the early/mid-1920s. Also, I see a spring-clip on the inside of the lid which would be exactly the place to store a "violet wand."

Is there a manufacturer's plate on it anywhere?

Also, I would seriously hesitate to peel off the vinyl until I knew exactly what I had, and what it might be worth (either monitarily, or just semi-historically) in relatively-original condition.


Your inner-Lovejoy may know a lot more than me - the inner surface is definitely bakelite, but the general design and the plastic covering led me to think 60s rather than earlier. There is a leather handle on top which you can't see in these shots which may indicate age. I'm not sure how to find out anything further about this, as a quick google doesn't throw up any obvious leads* and its not the sort of thing that the average antique shop would know anything about. Any light anyone can throw on it would be gratefully received. Incidently it cost £20, so is probably unlikely to be secretly worth squillions, and if i did strip off the plastic it would presumably look like a less beat up version of this: http://s3.amazonaws.com/bk_store/images/photo_object/photos/4/1/4101774/photo.jpg


*googling it via 'images' also taught me that violet wands have now moved very definitely from the realm of the medical to the sex toy, and OH MY GOD some of those images were NSFW *office based shame*. Stop sniggering at the back, this is _not_ funny.
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Prof Eumides Blakehurst
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« Reply #212 on: July 09, 2009, 12:50:27 am »

One in decent working condition (even with a replacement, modern coil) and a single attachemtn will go for about £150. A replacement polymer coil will cost you about £30. Even with no attachment for the patient treatment you have scored a bargain. The various attachments can probaly be had more cheaply than getting a complete working set anyway.
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TheaWright
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« Reply #213 on: July 09, 2009, 12:58:03 am »

Found a bunch of little bottles at the new St. Vincent De Paul that opened down the street from my house.  They were only 29 cents each!  I bought three but if I think of something cool to do with them I'll go back to see if there are still more left (there were loads--probably about 20).
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von Corax
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« Reply #214 on: July 09, 2009, 03:58:44 am »

Madam Mim:

I'm almost certain it isn't from the 1960s. Industrial design of that era was begining to lean far more toward The Jetsons/Sleeper/Fahrenheit 451 with white structural plastics and chrome or bright-coloured plastic knobs. Vinyl-veneered wood like your box has suggests to me the late 1920s, as does the minimalist Art Deco-ish shape of the knobs. Also, in the 1920s the violet wand actually was a medical device; all sorts of "electro-theraputic" devices were marketed in that period, most of which we would now consider useless or even dangerous quackery. (One particular style of violet wand was designed as a treatment for baldness.)

I do point out that I am not an expert in this matter, and that you might consider looking for a specialist in medical antiques, perhaps through your local museum or historical society.
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pewtersmith
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« Reply #215 on: July 09, 2009, 06:10:39 am »

I had a great day at the Alameda Point Antique show :
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a 1920s destroyer model all wood and metal ,a 1900 military/fraternal cap ,a  butlers table , a 1940's Speed Graphic , a tripod cane for which I've made a new top for cameras ( it was missing the part that attached to the tripod legs so I don't know if was meant to be a camera tripod or a seat or a music stand ). I'll post more pictures of the tripod in another thread.
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WillRockwell
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« Reply #216 on: July 09, 2009, 12:39:52 pm »

I also picked up an antique electronic medical miracle machine this weekend. It's a vibrator, still working, and fills the room with ozone when you turn it on. I also found a cool brass inkwell and cute little lamp. All this stuff is on Ebay now.
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Arceye
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« Reply #217 on: July 10, 2009, 01:03:08 am »

If you wish to use such devices make sure the insulation and cabling is still OK. I am the proud owner of a 50's Violet Wand which has given much pleasure, but the insulation is paper ffs and I have retired it for safety reasons.
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WillRockwell
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« Reply #218 on: July 10, 2009, 01:39:28 pm »

If you wish to use such devices make sure the insulation and cabling is still OK. I am the proud owner of a 50's Violet Wand which has given much pleasure, but the insulation is paper ffs and I have retired it for safety reasons.

If you can find that early electric cable in good shape, it adds a visual element to fabrications. I found a 1930's electric heater and used its cable in my plasma globe project. The cable is only carrying 12V, but its appearance enhances the period look of the piece.
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WillRockwell
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« Reply #219 on: July 10, 2009, 04:12:07 pm »

This was not even a flea market find, I picked it up out of the trash in Manhattan. It looked like it had great steam potential, perhaps someone has a more specific idea how I could use it. That's my Bengal cat Kumba, in the picture for scale.

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« Reply #220 on: July 10, 2009, 08:14:51 pm »

How about part of a lamp(shade)?
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von Corax
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« Reply #221 on: July 11, 2009, 12:08:36 am »

Muzzle shield for an anti-kraken ætheric-modulator gun?
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The Designer
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« Reply #222 on: July 11, 2009, 12:54:43 am »

you guys find the neatest things!
I'm going to try and get some brassy bits of my dad, he works in a plumbing store and they get stock now and then that is unusable due to water restrictions (litres per second) and he usually scraps them, so i might grab some next time, would make a good top for a cane or something
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maduncle
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« Reply #223 on: July 11, 2009, 11:23:29 am »

you guys find the neatest things!
I'm going to try and get some brassy bits of my dad, he works in a plumbing store and they get stock now and then that is unusable due to water restrictions (litres per second) and he usually scraps them, so i might grab some next time, would make a good top for a cane or something

If you are in Australia and in Melbourne the 'neatest things' can be found at the Camberwell Market on Sunday mornings.

WillRockwell - that trash find is SO pointy flared end of a blunderbuss type thing.
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Sir L. Cuilein
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« Reply #224 on: July 12, 2009, 08:12:18 pm »

The wife and I have been slowly steampunking our home here in Wisconsin and yesterday we came across these!
Mind you they were an Antique store find and not a flea market but I couldn't resist!
These are Pipe Organ pipes patented 1889.
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