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Author Topic: Victorian-era toys, and photographs  (Read 5684 times)
MrFats
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« on: March 25, 2007, 03:15:28 am »

I've gone to the Brooklyn Children's Museum in NY for quite some time with my young progeny. It was only after learning that what I like has a name, that I sought out things related to it. I submit, for all,a selection of toys from that era, and photographs from the museum's archives.

This is a doll, circa 1850-1880



Horse and buggy from Ireland, circa 1800



A steam wagon. It says "Mamod Steam Wagon"
(I don't know if it's from the 1800s, more like the early-mid 1900s, but it's still a very nice piece)



A close-up of the front:



First photograph, of two young boys looking at an exhibition box from the museum, circa 1901, I believe



Same time period, a gent unloading exhibition boxes to put in the museum



A few children learning about something, I'm not quite sure what, I think nature.

« Last Edit: March 25, 2007, 03:21:16 am by MrFats » Logged

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The Grand Duchess
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« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2007, 03:54:46 am »

Very nice!  I haven't been there for a while- I'll have to go again.

In a different vein, there's an exhibit at the New-York Historical Society on blacks during the Civil War- it's very child-friendly.
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« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2007, 04:01:52 am »

 Shocked

The Mamod Steam Wagon. My grandmother had something that looked exactly like that which I used to sit and play with when I was little. Something that had enough weight to it that if i threw at my older brother I could probably kill him(or at least give permanent brain damage) but a very nice toy, just not in nearly as good a condition as the one pictured.
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MrFats
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« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2007, 12:55:50 pm »

I have heard of the exhibit, Duchess (I am quite the museum , but I will probably not attend (scheduling conflicts)

Mr. Lazaras, it's quite refreshing to know there were other examples of such items, even if they did not withstand the test of time as much as we'd hoped. My greatest caveat with that steam wagon, was the fact it was placed all the way in the back, making it difficult to get the whole toy in the shot.
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Dr von Zarkov
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« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2007, 01:34:08 pm »

From their clothing, shoes, and hair-cuts, one suspects that the two boys examining the case are from a year later than 1902, perhaps the same era as the gentleman unloading exhibits.

One detail on the Mamod Steam Engine strikes one as odd. The roof over the operator's cab appears to be fastened with pop-rivets, which are a more modern innovation. Perhaps this sort of rivet was used in a recent restoration of the toy.

Historical museums are a wonderful source of authentic information about the Victorian era. Too much of the steampunk genre is the result of the fancies of ill-informed art directors and cartoonists.
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MrFats
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« Reply #5 on: March 25, 2007, 01:48:06 pm »

One can safely assume these items had to be restored, to some degree, as I'm sure they did not look quite as well kept when they were received by the museum. That, and the toys incur wear, making repairs necessary. Also, the photograph's caption said 1902, I was merely going by what it said. On close inspection, it does look later than what was written...I should speak with them next time I go with my young charges.
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AetherVoid
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« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2007, 02:18:29 pm »

Dr. von Zarkov is right. Those last three images are more 1930 I would think. Didn't the Victorian era end in 1901 ?

Is that automobile in front of the museum a Citroen ? That would solve the mystery.
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MrFats
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« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2007, 04:04:45 pm »

I'm not sure myself. Perhaps one of the other gentlemen or ladies would know?
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Andy_W
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« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2007, 04:17:42 pm »

The Mamod Steam lorry is a recent toy and can be picked up on ebay for bargain prices...

http://search.ebay.co.uk/search/search.dll?from=R40&satitle=Mamod+Steam
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MrFats
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« Reply #9 on: March 25, 2007, 04:29:59 pm »

The museum lied to me  Cry For this, there will be swift justice!! (ok, not really. But the steam wagon is still an interesting toy. Maybe I'll purchase one for my kids)
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Andy_W
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« Reply #10 on: March 25, 2007, 11:11:25 pm »

I wonder how hard it would be to mod one of the Mamod models into an RC ? I wonder what size of servos would be required?
One for stearing another for the whistle and one for stop and go. Hmmm? 
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