Author Topic: Aging wood  (Read 16582 times)

JingleJoe

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Aging wood
« on: March 16, 2008, 01:38:45 pm »
Ahoy my steam-friends :)
I need to know good ways to age wood, and lots of them as I know they will all have differing outcomes (by that I mean all aged but all looking slightly different in the end)
Please provide detail in descriptions and brands of things used as well if possible!
Also I'd prefare aging techniques that bring out the grain in the wood too, but all methods will be appreciated :D
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Dr cornelius quack

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2008, 02:19:33 pm »
Good method for extreme ageing/weathering.

1. Shape the workpiece using the normal methods, saws, files, axes etc.

2. Pick up your blowlamp.

3. Play the flame of the blowlamp over the wood till it chars/ catches fire.

4. Beat out the flames.

5. Use a wire brush to remove the charred bits. This will leave the surface of the wood quite deeply ridged along the line of the grain as the fire tends to burn the less dense summer growth timber first.

Looks great for driftwood effects and old buildings that look as though they've been through a hundred years of sand storms.

Old untreated oak goes the most amazing (almost metallic) silver colour. You might try a pewter toned gilding wax applied very thinly.

Also take a look at that fine Victorian technique of painting "wood" to look like "wood." i.e. "woodgraining", Paint a flat board with a cream
basecoat. Apply a coat of "Scumble" ( Not the one thats made "Mostly from apples") Use a "graining rubber" (available from craft stores)
to shape the scumble into beautiful grain patterns. Use a brush to add some "Medullary rays" .Give the thing a coat of varnish. and the jobs a good 'un.

Try this site for some good examples by an old mate of mine.www.canaljunction.com/news/mainline.htm

Don't forget the antique forgers method of "distressing". Basically, you just beat the crap out of your workpiece with a length of chain and then polish over the dents.

Kind regards,
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« Last Edit: March 16, 2008, 03:08:16 pm by Dr cornelius quack »
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WisconsinPlatt

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2008, 04:30:15 pm »
Already finished pieces can be aged with a bit of black and/or dark brown boot polish.  Dab it on rub it off.  It gives an over all worn look and makes the grain stand out.





Don't forget the antique forgers method of "distressing". Basically, you just beat the crap out of your workpiece with a length of chain and then polish over the dents.


I always enjoy playing "Name that Tool" when looking over "distressed furniture"...that looks to be an awl stabbed into it several times...yep...that looks to be a hunk of chain...oooh..looks like someone tried to get creative with needle nose pliers here.

A shop here that sells unfinished furniture has a line that comes from from over seas somewhere and every piece has similar distress marks in the same basic area on each piece.  So I have to believe there is some one employed in a factory somewhere whose job it is to just beat up furniture pieces according to some plan...

Step one.  Hit with chain Three (3) times in upper right corner.
Step two.  Stab with awl at least Six (6) and no more than Twelve (12) times along front edge of chair.
Step three.  Use chisel to lightly scar back of chair from Six inches (6") to Fourteen inches (14").
Step four.  ...







Magnus

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2008, 06:10:42 pm »
i will second the chain flail method here.

i also remember reading that diluted hydrochloric acid can help age the wood grain before staining and varnishing

juxtimon

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2008, 07:53:10 pm »
oil paint is your friend here- use a variety of colours (but mainly burnt sienna, and umber) and varying amounts of turps or white spirits to thin it. daub it on, rub it in, wipe it off, leave some bits dark and thick, other bits thin and barely tinted.

it is the standard way of building up 'patina' on wood.  i'll also second the chain method, blunt round dents are much more realistic than sharp cornered angular ones :)
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Dr cornelius quack

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2008, 08:05:45 pm »
Another good effect is to "knock back" the leading edges of the workpiece. All those areas that would catch the most wear can be sanded back to simulate the effect. Another one the forgers like.

Kind regards,

Dr. Q.

akumabito

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2008, 08:12:38 pm »
If you've got some nice deep scratches in your project, go look around for some dirt.. The red clay/dust we have around here is great, but probably not available over there.. find something that looks interesting, apply generously over your project and give it some time to really work its way into all the small crevices. After a while, give it a good thorough cleanup.. the dust is so fine it is impossible to get it out of every hole and it'll add to the worn look.. :)

Dusza Beben

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #7 on: March 16, 2008, 10:24:06 pm »
Aye! to all of the above. Woodburning tools or soldering irons are handy for making bark beetle or worm tracks/holes as well.
Look at a few actual antiques as well to get the placement of your "weather" right. Nothing stands out more than a piece with excessive wear where it would not generally happen. Opening edge of a lidded box? Yes! Outside bottom corners? Yes! Inside of lid? NO!
You get the picture.

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JingleJoe

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #8 on: March 16, 2008, 11:35:40 pm »
Thanks everyone this is all really helpful!
Also I get about the different areas that should and should not be aged :P I've spent enough time around old and battered wood to know ;)
That shoe polish technique seems quite promising I will definatley try it :) Acctually I'll probably try all techniques stated here, can't wait for the dawn I've got work to do now :D

go look around for some dirt.. [...] apply generously over your project and give it some time to really work its way into all the small crevices. After a while, give it a good thorough cleanup.. the dust is so fine it is impossible to get it out of every hole and it'll add to the worn look.. :)
Of course, soil! I have clays, sandy, grey and rich brown all in my back garden! They can be dried and dampened to my requirements :)
« Last Edit: March 16, 2008, 11:38:34 pm by JingleJoe »

Orlando

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2008, 12:57:26 am »
Sir,
I have seen your Valve Voltmeter at http://joe64.deviantart.com/art/Thermionic-Voltmeter-76835590
Essential equipment for the adjustment of the Zepp's wireless telegraphy apparatus.

To the main business...
If you have occasion to finish new pine wood, I can recommend Rustin's Woodstains http://www.rustins.co.uk/ which are available in small sizes and many colours from the ironmonger's.  I find Light Oak with a drop of Red Mahogany in it to be very pleasing (blending is possible).  Application with a brush or rag immediately brings out the grain in a most satisfactory manner.  The staining is irreversible so testing for colour on scraps saved from construction is essential and being spirit based the smell may be offensive to some.

Orlando.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2008, 01:07:23 am by Orlando »

JingleJoe

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2008, 01:07:00 am »
Sir,
I have seen your Valve Voltmeter at http://joe64.deviantart.com/art/Thermionic-Voltmeter-76835590
Essential equipment for the adjustment of the Zepp's wireless telegraphy apparatus.

To the main business...
If you have occasion to finish new pine wood, I can recommend Rustin's Woodstains http://www.rustins.co.uk/ which are available in small sizes and many colours from the ironmonger's.  I find Light Oak with a drop of Red Mahogany in it to be very pleasing (blending is possible, as is diluting with paraffin).  Application with a brush or rag immedaitely brings out the grain in a most satisfactory manner.  The staining is irreversible so testing for colour on scraps saved from construction is essential and being paraffin based the smell may be offensive to some.

Orlando.
Ah fantastic someone spotted my device and thier first post was (vaguely ;)) about it! I feel honoured!
Thanks for the woodstain advice! Cant wait to try more of these techniques unfortunatley I had to see a good friend of mine today so didn't get round to trying anything out and I'm busy tomorrow too :(
Damn other humans and thier ability to foil my day-plans!!!

Orlando

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #11 on: March 18, 2008, 01:11:48 am »
Good Morning Joe,

Please note modifications to my first post.
For paraffin, read White Spirit !

Orlando.

JingleJoe

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #12 on: March 18, 2008, 01:18:02 am »
Aye spotted that ;)
(ah terrible pirate pun there XD )

Goggleyed

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #13 on: March 18, 2008, 01:49:53 am »
Shoot it with a shotgun before adding colors or stains. It acutally works pretty well. That and it lets you shoot something.

JingleJoe

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #14 on: March 19, 2008, 10:59:11 pm »
Just thought I'd updatea little;
I beat up the edges of my wood with a hammer and a bradawl nicely making it look worn and rounded and used some moderatley dark wood stain and my timber looks perfect :D
Thanks again everyone for the aging advise, all will come in useful!

Dusza Beben

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #15 on: March 20, 2008, 02:40:58 am »
Shoot it with a shotgun before adding colors or stains. It acutally works pretty well. That and it lets you shoot something.

Just not too close...  :)

DB

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #16 on: June 04, 2008, 06:47:12 am »
Hey folks, about aging a piece that's already been stained and varnished.  Anything else recommended beyond some boot black dab on, wipe off, repeat ad nauseum?  Thanks!

JingleJoe

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #17 on: June 04, 2008, 12:44:49 pm »
I'd avise distressing it before staining and varnishing but perhaps some scratches in the varnish which are then darkened or worn with boot black and sandpaper would make it look as though it's been around a long time and used alot :)

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #18 on: June 04, 2008, 02:15:27 pm »
My generic advice would be simulate the kind of accident that causes aging- polish or wax the piece, spills water over it, wipe dry, re-polish, put hot items on it, knock over a tub of greasy ball bearings and then try to get the oil out with turpentine, sand, clean, re-polish- you get the idea.  To simulate wear on the finish from handling, you could wet your hands with some kind of solvent and pick up/handle the object as you would normally for "accelerated aging".  As for damage- use your imagination, and a mallet. :)
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JingleJoe

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #19 on: June 04, 2008, 02:57:35 pm »
As for damage- use your imagination
Put it in a washing machine full of hammers! ;D

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #20 on: June 04, 2008, 04:05:52 pm »
As for damage- use your imagination
Put it in a washing machine full of hammers! ;D

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #21 on: June 04, 2008, 06:50:27 pm »
well as long as its not some thick urethane finish (you can see some of the actual woodgrain in the light)
powdered graphite works fine for adding years of neglect.
it's basically pencil dust, you can sand a pencil to make some to use.

rub it on and rub it into the woodgrain with a rag made into a little puffball.

it won't hold up to alot of manhandling without being sealed after but it can always be touched up.
it also dulls down and darkens the overall finish, especially if the finish is a little thin to begin with.

elliot

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #22 on: June 05, 2008, 02:03:53 am »
Hello, all,

All of the previous distressing methods that were previously mentioned work great.

The really difficult thing is to get the natural color of genuine aged wood. 
Paint and stain only go so far because you never really get the "shimmer" of the grain with stains.

Here is what I use:

Take a piece of plain steel wool (0000) extra-fine.

Soak it in white vinegar over night then take it out.  If you used 4 oz. of vineger,  add 4 oz. of water to the solution after the 24 hours. (total 8 oz.)

Slop it on the bare wood any way you like.  You'll see AMAZING results. Natural wood aging to perfection.

Combined with the mnechanical distressing it will be thoroughly convincing. 
Good luck and enjoy your work.  Best Regards,  Art Donovan

OldProfessorBear

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #23 on: June 05, 2008, 02:16:24 am »
The Lovejoy books contain a wealth of information on aging and other -um- simulation techniques.

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elliot

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Re: Aging wood
« Reply #24 on: June 05, 2008, 11:55:55 am »
Hello, Steam Fans,

In addition to my previous method of using a solution of steel wool and vinegar to age bare wood,  you may also use a commercially available solution to achieve the look of genuine aging on all bare woods.

You can purchase it from a US company called, "Micro Mark".  They specialize in small tools for the model builder. Click the link for the wood aging solution:
 
www.ares-server.com/Ares/Ares.asp?MerchantID=RET01229&Action=Catalog&Type=Product&ID=60863

This solution produces a grayer color on bare wood than the steel wool/vinegar. Which solution you choose depends upon your own preferences.

Be well,ALL and enjoy your Steampunk endeavors.

Art Donovan