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Author Topic: Victorian Shaving... yes, some of us still shave with a naked blade..  (Read 34785 times)
Prof. Rane, MA
Snr. Officer
****
France France



« Reply #50 on: September 09, 2007, 09:21:24 am »

I'd love to use a straigh-razor, but I can't help thinking that my carefully-manicured muttonchops would quickly become "wonky" at best. I can't imagine it's an easy job to navigate around shaped whiskers with a naked blade - at least, not without substantial practice.

Allow me to reply to that, from my few months of experience shaving with a straight razor...
One of the elements that determined me to try and shave the old-fashioned way (apart from the "old-fashionness" of it, obviously) was that I imagined a straight blade would allow for a precision in shaping straight lines and fine interstices -such as the narrow stretch between the lower edge of my chops and the bearded chin-, that a modern razor fell short of. I feel I have been proven right. Of course, a razor has to be supplemented by a pair or scissors here.
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Prof. Rane, MA
Darksmith
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« Reply #51 on: September 10, 2007, 12:26:26 am »

T
I'd love to use a straigh-razor, but I can't help thinking that my carefully-manicured muttonchops would quickly become "wonky" at best. I can't imagine it's an easy job to navigate around shaped whiskers with a naked blade - at least, not without substantial practice.

Allow me to reply to that, from my few months of experience shaving with a straight razor...
One of the elements that determined me to try and shave the old-fashioned way (apart from the "old-fashionness" of it, obviously) was that I imagined a straight blade would allow for a precision in shaping straight lines and fine interstices -such as the narrow stretch between the lower edge of my chops and the bearded chin-, that a modern razor fell short of. I feel I have been proven right. Of course, a razor has to be supplemented by a pair or scissors here.


Thats a large factor for my desire to start shaving with a straight razor. I greatly enjoy having a dashing set of chops, but can't keep them for very long because I have issues trying to see the edge of blades that are contained in plastic. It's a guessing game for me when I try to shave with mordern razor, and I always seem to loose, and make my chops rather lopsided. It does seem like it would be much easier to keep shaving from the edge of the chops with a straight razor, because you cane see exactly where you need to place the blade.
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Augustus Dayafter
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« Reply #52 on: September 12, 2007, 03:07:05 am »

I have used a straight razor for shaving since I learned to shave (not that I needed to shave back then mind you) and I am in absolute love with it. After I became a little longer in the tooth, shall we say, and started getting a tiny spot of thinning hair, I decided that it would be just prudent to shave all of that of as well. Let me tell you now, gentlemen that want to be bald, get somebody else to shave your head. If you want it done with an old style razor, please, please, get somebody else to do it. The scalp tends to bleed FOREVER if you even just barely nick it. The resulting horror show will have the weak of heart on the floor in seconds. So, I shave my face with my straight razor and my head with an electric. An electric that I am in the process of steampunking mind you Smiley I will throw some pictures of it up once I get it done.
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Stefan Freestate
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« Reply #53 on: September 12, 2007, 03:25:46 am »

Let me tell you now, gentlemen that want to be bald, get somebody else to shave your head. If you want it done with an old style razor, please, please, get somebody else to do it. The scalp tends to bleed FOREVER if you even just barely nick it. The resulting horror show will have the weak of heart on the floor in seconds.

*shudders*
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Prof. Brockworth
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Choppy Warburton rides again!


« Reply #54 on: September 12, 2007, 08:46:43 pm »

As the vernacular has it, "been there, done that, looked like a Tarantino movie".  Scalps are funny things. 
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Darksmith
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****

« Reply #55 on: December 27, 2007, 02:48:00 am »

I just got a H.J.H Special, Sheffield straight razor for christmas. Don't know anything about how old it is or anything like that. My plan is to take it to a barber and get him to hone it nicely for me, pick myself up a strop, and enjoy the resulting shave. I'm very excited to try it out, but until it is properly honed, it does not have the edge needed to shave.

It's a kind of torture, I've wanted a straight razor for so long, and now that I have one, it's not in the condition needed to shave with, so I can't even enjoy the benefits of having a straight razor...sigh. Soon though, soon.
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HAC
Steam Theologian
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« Reply #56 on: December 27, 2007, 03:06:36 am »

I just got a H.J.H Special, Sheffield straight razor for christmas. Don't know anything about how old it is or anything like that. My plan is to take it to a barber and get him to hone it nicely for me, pick myself up a strop, and enjoy the resulting shave. I'm very excited to try it out, but until it is properly honed, it does not have the edge needed to shave.

It's a kind of torture, I've wanted a straight razor for so long, and now that I have one, it's not in the condition needed to shave with, so I can't even enjoy the benefits of having a straight razor...sigh. Soon though, soon.

Get lots of styptic or bandaids, if you've never shaved straight before...It's a great shave, but the learning curve can be very bloody... (tip, never move the razor in a direction even slightly parallel to the egde, unless you're going for the Heidelburg look  Cheesy)
  I had the luck of being taught to shave with a straight razor somewhere around 40+ years ago, by my grandfather, who never shaved with anything else..
Cheers
Harold
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CapnHarlock
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« Reply #57 on: December 28, 2007, 02:14:09 am »

For those who wish to experiment with straight-razor shaving, without spending a fortune, please have a look at: http://www.budk.com. Their recent cutlery catalog (received today) has several modern straight razors, all for less than $10US.  I would not expect Solingen-quality for this price, but you may be able to discover whether or not you want to consider an upgrade in the future.
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anomalie
Guest
« Reply #58 on: December 28, 2007, 11:19:53 am »

I would love to convince my boyfriend to use one of these. I did manage to get him off the dreadful electric thing he'd been using before (I think guys tend to use the same method their fathers did). He uses the regular mach-whatevers you get in drug stores, and there's an improvement, but his whiskers are rather coarse and grow back quickly - which does not make so nice for my chin where there are smooches about.

I doubt I'd be able to get him to use a straight-razor, since one seems to need an acquired skill to do it well, and I assume it takes much longer (plus they are a little scary). I'm wondering about the safety razors, though (I hope I have the correct name). But are they expensive to replace the blades and difficult to learn to use? I may get him something like that for his birthday... er, if I can find a nice one for a reasonable price. They're quite expensive!

If any of the gentlemen here would like to give me pros and cons between the two, I would greatly appreciate it. Smiley

On another note, it's a shame there aren't better shaving options for a lady's needs. Shaving with drugstore razors (no matter HOW much one spends) leads hair to grow back quickly (or can give bumps, in more delicate areas) and waxing a) hurts, I presume and b) is pricey.
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Mr Mockett
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« Reply #59 on: December 28, 2007, 10:39:03 pm »

So to chime in about safet-razors, I found in my collection of stuff (no real idea where I got it) and Wilkinson Sword 7-day kit in a LOVELY chrome case. 

I should probably take a couple pictures to show, but I wonder whether or not it would be ok to use.  I am not of the opinion that antiques are meant for show, but since it is a safety razor, and I should in theory be able to acquire new blades, there shouldn't be a problem.

I'll need to get some of that sandalwood shaving soap!

What do you chaps/ladies think?
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the Hat
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« Reply #60 on: December 29, 2007, 03:30:02 am »

The last few posts here are making me feel as if I've stumbled into the Sweeney Todd thread.  Tongue
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Mr Mockett
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« Reply #61 on: December 29, 2007, 04:05:58 am »

If anyone wants to see the kit I mentioned, I uploaded pictures to a flickr site:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/mrmockett/

I'm wondering if I'll actually be able to find replacement blades for it, if I decided to use it.  Anyone see replacement blades for a piece like that?
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johnny99
Snr. Officer
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United States United States



« Reply #62 on: December 29, 2007, 06:13:38 am »

Greetings
     Having used a strait razor to shave with for the last twenty odd years, I feel qualified to make a couple of suggestions.
     First off, to the person that suggested buying a razor from BudK. Please don't even consider it. Nothing will put you off shaving with a strait razor quicker that trying to use one that is dull, and nothing you order from Budk will hold the  edge you need to shave, well.
     For better control. hold the middle of the blade pinched between your thumb and your first two fingers, with the edge just barely sticking out. and your fingernails resting on your face to act as a sort of steady rest, or standoff.
     For the LADIES. may I suggest that if you want the look, but not the inconvenience, that you blunt the edge of a strait razor ( BudK would be fine for this) completely. So that it is rounded over and incapable of cutting you. Like a butter knife. Then replace the soap with a depilatory cream, and use the razor as a scrapper.
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We have enough youth. How about a fountain of smart!
Vienna Fahrmann
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Austria Austria


« Reply #63 on: December 29, 2007, 06:54:51 am »


     Dear Hat,

     At least nobody has started posting recipes yet...

     Vienna
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aquafortis
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #64 on: December 31, 2007, 02:16:24 am »

Take one well-fatted public official, fresh and well bled...

Just mentioned this sort of thing in another thread. I find there's not a lot of potential for really severe cutting unless that's what you intend or are really cack-handed. I'm sure the use of straight razors as weapons is an intimidation thing above all else. In an actual fight, I'm sure the claw hammer or the potato peeler would win.
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gpalmer
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« Reply #65 on: December 31, 2007, 02:26:20 am »

I would love to convince my boyfriend to use one of these. I did manage to get him off the dreadful electric thing he'd been using before (I think guys tend to use the same method their fathers did). He uses the regular mach-whatevers you get in drug stores, and there's an improvement, but his whiskers are rather coarse and grow back quickly - which does not make so nice for my chin where there are smooches about.

I doubt I'd be able to get him to use a straight-razor, since one seems to need an acquired skill to do it well, and I assume it takes much longer (plus they are a little scary). I'm wondering about the safety razors, though (I hope I have the correct name). But are they expensive to replace the blades and difficult to learn to use? I may get him something like that for his birthday... er, if I can find a nice one for a reasonable price. They're quite expensive!

If any of the gentlemen here would like to give me pros and cons between the two, I would greatly appreciate it. Smiley

On another note, it's a shame there aren't better shaving options for a lady's needs. Shaving with drugstore razors (no matter HOW much one spends) leads hair to grow back quickly (or can give bumps, in more delicate areas) and waxing a) hurts, I presume and b) is pricey.

I'm female, so anything I say is not in regards to shaving the face.  However, I use an old safety razor, circa the 1950s or so, and I like it very much.  The blades are far cheaper to replace than those for the plastic razors, and it's very comfortable.  I do cut myself with it sometimes, but about as often as I did with more conventional razors.  The difference?  With a multi-blade modern razor, you get a series of lacerations.  With a safety razor, there's just one cut, and it seals up quickly.

However, if he shaves in a hurry, he should avoid this type of razor.  You -must- go slowly.

Grace D. Palmer
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HAC
Steam Theologian
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Canada Canada


HAC_N800
« Reply #66 on: December 31, 2007, 02:28:14 am »

Merkur has some of the nicest safety razors around, quality stuff..  IMHO better than the old ones..

Cheers
Harold

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Darksmith
Snr. Officer
****

« Reply #67 on: January 01, 2008, 07:51:34 pm »

Yay!!! I just had my first shave with my straight razor. I'm not sure if it's not quite sharp enough, or if my technique just needs that much more work. But the happy news is that I cut myself less, and did less damage to my face, with the straight razor. The spot that I had the biggest trouble with was just underneath my and along my jaw line. But oh what a wonderfully smooth shave it gives, I don't think my face has been this smooth since before I started growing facial hair.
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anomalie
Guest
« Reply #68 on: January 01, 2008, 09:28:46 pm »

I would love to convince my boyfriend to use one of these. I did manage to get him off the dreadful electric thing he'd been using before (I think guys tend to use the same method their fathers did). He uses the regular mach-whatevers you get in drug stores, and there's an improvement, but his whiskers are rather coarse and grow back quickly - which does not make so nice for my chin where there are smooches about.

I doubt I'd be able to get him to use a straight-razor, since one seems to need an acquired skill to do it well, and I assume it takes much longer (plus they are a little scary). I'm wondering about the safety razors, though (I hope I have the correct name). But are they expensive to replace the blades and difficult to learn to use? I may get him something like that for his birthday... er, if I can find a nice one for a reasonable price. They're quite expensive!

If any of the gentlemen here would like to give me pros and cons between the two, I would greatly appreciate it. Smiley

On another note, it's a shame there aren't better shaving options for a lady's needs. Shaving with drugstore razors (no matter HOW much one spends) leads hair to grow back quickly (or can give bumps, in more delicate areas) and waxing a) hurts, I presume and b) is pricey.

I'm female, so anything I say is not in regards to shaving the face.  However, I use an old safety razor, circa the 1950s or so, and I like it very much.  The blades are far cheaper to replace than those for the plastic razors, and it's very comfortable.  I do cut myself with it sometimes, but about as often as I did with more conventional razors.  The difference?  With a multi-blade modern razor, you get a series of lacerations.  With a safety razor, there's just one cut, and it seals up quickly.

However, if he shaves in a hurry, he should avoid this type of razor.  You -must- go slowly.

Grace D. Palmer


Thanks for the advice!

I'm thinking of switching methods of hair removal myself, because I hate multi-blade razors. I don't know if I'd personally go for the safety razor (I'm not sure how it would fare in more... er.. delicate areas). But, waxing everything is expensive.
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zenmondo
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« Reply #69 on: January 02, 2008, 04:04:39 am »

Here is a question, is it a skill worth learning when I wear a full beard and I would just be shaving south of my chin (that is my neck and underjaw)?  I once recieved a mug & brush as a gift and loved shaving with the soap much better than cream and used that for years, so really what I need is the proper instruments, I feel like I have been doing half the picture.  Albeit its been years since I have had a proper shave even on my neck, usually I just take the guide off my beard trimmer and use it as an electric razor on my neck, but it never gets close.
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Darksmith
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« Reply #70 on: January 02, 2008, 03:57:10 pm »

As someone how has just recently tried shaving with a straight razor, the neck and under the chin part is the trickiest to get. I had to cheat and use a cartridge razor to get the last little tuft from under my chin cause I have quite figure how to get it all.

I am happy to report though that I woke up with a 5 O'clock shadow, instead of having a noon shadow. About 12 hours after the shave, my face felt like it did right after I shave with a cartridge razor. I'm very impressed with the straight razor, I just need to get better at it.
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Alexander Edmund Clough
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« Reply #71 on: January 03, 2008, 01:11:33 am »

Inspired by this thread, and fed up with (a) the cost or replacing cartridge razor blades, (b) the eco-unfriendliness of disposable blades, (c) uneven shave with electric razor and (d) razor irritation with both! (I've tried everything so far... well almost everything), I have just given in to a long held desire and purchased a beginner's set of double sided hone / strop on a wooden handle and straight razor, along with a second straight razor to shave with (the first razor that came with the beginners set is going to be solely for sharpening practice).

Hopefully, once these arrive they will lead to shaving nirvana and I'll then "upgrade" to a nice Dovo blade and a decent hanging strop.

Here's hoping this leads to me becoming another convert to victorian shaving Smiley
« Last Edit: January 03, 2008, 01:33:52 am by Alexander Edmund Clough » Logged
Alexander Edmund Clough
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« Reply #72 on: January 03, 2008, 02:04:19 am »

Inspired by this thread, and fed up with (a) the cost or replacing cartridge razor blades, (b) the eco-unfriendliness of disposable blades, (c) uneven shave with electric razor and (d) razor irritation with both! (I've tried everything so far... well almost everything), I have just given in to a long held desire and purchased a beginner's set of double sided hone / strop on a wooden handle and straight razor, along with a second straight razor to shave with (the first razor that came with the beginners set is going to be solely for sharpening practice).

Hopefully, once these arrive they will lead to shaving nirvana and I'll then "upgrade" to a nice Dovo blade and a decent hanging strop.

Here's hoping this leads to me becoming another convert to victorian shaving Smiley

That said, if I have the problems around chin / top lip area that I think I might have, then I may end up regrowing my faceweasel and keep the straight razor for cheeks, neck and chops.  Cheesy
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Mr Mockett
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« Reply #73 on: January 03, 2008, 04:46:16 am »

I, too, have decided to take the plunge.  Albeit, not to the throat-cutter.  I found a nice Schick Injector to whet my whistle, as it were.  Lovely brass colored head with caramel bakelite handle:

http://www.safetyrazors.net/schick/schick_razors5.jpg

I figured, from what I've been reading, that this will be a nice compromise to get me into the wetshaving business without the steeper learning curve of a DE Safety.  Now I just need some Trumpers products... Smiley

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Unkillable cat
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #74 on: January 03, 2008, 03:32:21 pm »

I use the Merkur Progress (DE) and have to say that I would never go back to a safety razor. In the UK Ive found that the best blades are without a doubt the Tesco blades, £1.99 for ten, and they easily rival the Wilkinson Swords. Im still building up the confidence t go all the way to using a straight razor.
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