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Author Topic: Victorian Shaving... yes, some of us still shave with a naked blade..  (Read 34780 times)
HAC
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HAC_N800
« Reply #125 on: August 14, 2008, 11:53:24 pm »

And the width of the blade?

Hang on, 4.45mm?

And you hone and strop is with the back of the hollow grind on hte same line as the cutting edge...? That's...epically thick. I expected they'd be thinner at the spine...

Dorko  - 4.87mm at spine... hollow ground - Chinese  flat ground 4.99 mm at the spine.. I hone with the spine flat on the waterstones. Stropping, its hard to say as the hanging strop does curve a bit when stropping, but Again, the spine is on or slightly above the surface of the strop..

Cheers
Harold
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Alexander Edmund Clough
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« Reply #126 on: August 14, 2008, 11:57:46 pm »

The blade is 18.36mm from cutting edge to back of spine and 77mm long.

The thickness of the spine is what gives you the perfect angle to get the wicked edge - i.e. you hone and strop with the spine laying flat on the stone / strop.

Cue a bad doodle....

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HAC
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« Reply #127 on: August 15, 2008, 12:02:10 am »

From one of the discussions on a forum for razor making bladesmiths...

"Tim's blades are ground extremely thin at the edge, although they're half-hollows. That makes the etching thing less of an issue. He flat-grinds his blades, actually, and he takes them right down to .001", then grinds in the hollows."


Cheers
Harold


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Sir Nikolas of Vendigroth
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« Reply #128 on: August 15, 2008, 11:19:07 am »

I'm going to make some test pieces. 4mm thick and 20mm wide, one hollow-ground, one flat-ground, and come back with some results.
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Sir Nikolas of Vendigroth
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« Reply #129 on: August 15, 2008, 02:54:49 pm »

Alright, the steel's on order, I've got fresh belts and I'm stocing up on polishing compound and sandpaper.
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Sir Nikolas of Vendigroth
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« Reply #130 on: August 21, 2008, 08:42:36 pm »

I own this; an inheritance of sorts.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

It's a fair shaver, but what model is it?
« Last Edit: August 21, 2008, 10:56:09 pm by Sir Nikolas Vendigroth » Logged
HAC
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HAC_N800
« Reply #131 on: August 21, 2008, 10:28:46 pm »

It looks a lot like a 1930's Gillette Tech clone with a travel handle.. I know a few collectors, let me ask..
Anything marked on the underside of the blade bar?

Here is my current stable of daily shavers, They all shave well, it's juts a matter of what one to choose that day ..

1939 Gillette Tech, very mild, very close shaver.





1960's Gillette Slim adjustable, adjustable to suit the blade, and your face, great shaver, very well balanced



1950's Gillette Super Speed - bit more agressive than the Tech, but a very nice light razor..



And the only modern (i.e new) raazor - Merkur 12C Open Comb




Once stock is replensished I'm ordering an Edwin Jagger Chatsworth in Horn and Gold, and perhaps a bottle of Penhaligon's "Blenheim Bouquet"
(Pic from vendor)

Cheers
Harold

« Last Edit: August 21, 2008, 10:41:04 pm by HAC » Logged
Sir Nikolas of Vendigroth
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« Reply #132 on: August 21, 2008, 10:53:05 pm »

The Gillette trade mark, and on the other side, "MADE IN ENGLAND" Nothin' else.

I know it's AT LEAST 25 years old, and almost certainly a lot older, unless my grandfather bought it new, then died the next day...

Needless to say, after an uncertain length of storage, I gave it a damn' good clean.
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HAC
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« Reply #133 on: August 21, 2008, 11:25:31 pm »

Yep.. its a Tech, then... Those are pretty good razors..

Cheers
Harold
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Sir Nikolas of Vendigroth
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« Reply #134 on: August 21, 2008, 11:29:26 pm »

It works well enough for me, 'though the corners of the jawbone, under my ears and the spot just behind my chin can still feel a bit stubbly at times.

Practice, eh?
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neon_suntan
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« Reply #135 on: August 22, 2008, 01:41:44 am »


Are these better than the ludicrously overpriced quadruple bladed plastic widgets sold in supermarkets these days? [assuming practice and a learning curve]

And will they rust if I use them to shave in the shower?
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ViSuvius
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« Reply #136 on: August 22, 2008, 02:03:31 am »

I wish I had taken pictures at Ren faire.  Oso forge, the place where me and the hubby get all of our blades are now making ...hand forged, cable and pattern weld damascus straight razors...handles range from fossilized walrus ivory, to deer bone, to coca bola wood.  Alas I did not have the $$ to buy one and they do not currently have pictures on their website.
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HAC
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« Reply #137 on: August 22, 2008, 02:41:08 am »


Are these better than the ludicrously overpriced quadruple bladed plastic widgets sold in supermarkets these days? [assuming practice and a learning curve]

And will they rust if I use them to shave in the shower?

Once I got my Tech, I quit using the Schick Quattro.. The Tech (and most of the other vintage Gillette safety razors) are made of  plated brass, so they don't rust. I get a far better shave ( and the blades are a heck of a lot cheaper) than cartridges.. My shave routine is this...



- Shower, and  make sure the beard is hydrated..
- Dry off, proceed to en suite, and get out the shaving bowl, shaving cream, and the badger brush..
- Select razor for the day.
- Make lather (in shaving bowl), and lather face, making sure to massage in the lather with the brush..
- Shave- first pass, with the grain of beard growth,
- Re-lather face.
- Shave - second pass, across the grain of beard and against the grain of beard as needed.
- Wet hands with warm water, and wet face withitu rinsing off left-on latehr.
- Shave - water pass - get the spots that need that last bit of touch up.
- Rinse with face cloth and COLD water
- Repeat rinse.
- Dry face.
- Apply after shave balm

The result is a shave that is close enough that you can't feel stubble with your fingers.  Usually no nicks or weepers, unless I've been careless (technique, as in razor angel, and NO pressure, is everything)

There is a very good set of "how-to" videos on YouTube, by a fellow called "mantic59"..

Cheers
Harold
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Sir Nikolas of Vendigroth
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« Reply #138 on: August 22, 2008, 11:06:31 am »


Are these better than the ludicrously overpriced quadruple bladed plastic widgets sold in supermarkets these days? [assuming practice and a learning curve]

And will they rust if I use them to shave in the shower?

Yes, with proper technique.

And mine's chrome brass, with a stainless blade, so no, it won't rust 'S a better idea to shave out of the shower in front of a mirror, though.

I wish I had taken pictures at Ren faire.  Oso forge, the place where me and the hubby get all of our blades are now making ...hand forged, cable and pattern weld damascus straight razors...handles range from fossilized walrus ivory, to deer bone, to coca bola wood.  Alas I did not have the $$ to buy one and they do not currently have pictures on their website.

Patience, dear, I'm workin' on making damascus...

Gettin' good results, too. =]
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neon_suntan
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« Reply #139 on: August 22, 2008, 11:19:48 am »


I've sen plenty of these around in second hand shops etc.

Are they worth buying with a view to cleaning restoration?

Will they still be hygenic.. and if not how could that be rectified?
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Sir Nikolas of Vendigroth
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« Reply #140 on: August 22, 2008, 11:21:40 am »

Oh, yeah. If the chrome's reasonably intact you should be fine.

And, after sitting around in a second-hand shop for god knows how long, it probably wouldn't be too hygienic. A good boilin'd fix that, however, or hte application of some disinfectant fluid.
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Kuulith
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« Reply #141 on: August 22, 2008, 12:59:07 pm »

id love to shave with a straight razor but im stuck with safety razors because i have a strange twitch/shake so i can't do anything like that for safety reasons Sad
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« Reply #142 on: August 22, 2008, 02:23:36 pm »

I have been attempting to shave with a straight razor for some time, though I fear my blade is not sharp enough, I have attempted to sharpen it with my strop but with no avail, any suggestions?
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HAC
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« Reply #143 on: August 22, 2008, 04:18:06 pm »


I've sen plenty of these around in second hand shops etc.

Are they worth buying with a view to cleaning restoration?

Will they still be hygenic.. and if not how could that be rectified?

I use a solution of 70% to 90% ethyl or isopropyl alcohol solution or a dilution of 1 part bleach (5.25% sodium hypochlorite) to 99 parts water, after cleaning the razor. Those solutions are the ones recommended by the local public health authorities to barbers for blades that "touch the skin". Barbicide ( a commercial product) also works, but the other two are cheaper, and are more effective.
 On cleaning up a razor, if its NOT gold plated, you can boil it first to loosen up any gunk, and then clean with a toothbrush and a cleaner such as 'Scrubbing Bubbles" or 'CLR Bathroom Cleaner" or any of those products that are designed to remove soap scum.  Rinse well in cold water, and then, if needed, lubricate any moving parts with mineral oil..

Cheers
Harold
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Vandr
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« Reply #144 on: August 23, 2008, 04:43:40 am »

I have been attempting to shave with a straight razor for some time, though I fear my blade is not sharp enough, I have attempted to sharpen it with my strop but with no avail, any suggestions?

Your blade may need to be honed.  Stropping needs to be done before (or after) every shave; honing needs to be done about every six months (if you're shaving with that razor daily).  Honing should also be done when the straight razor is new: out-of-the-box straights are usually not shave-ready.

Honing can be done by yourself, but you'll need a series of sharpening tools (mostly waterstones, which can be a little pricey).  There are also people who will do it for you, usually for around $20--I can recommend a few if you need.
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von Corax
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« Reply #145 on: August 23, 2008, 10:00:18 am »

1960's Gillette Slim adjustable, adjustable to suit the blade, and your face, great shaver, very well balanced

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Cheers
Harold


Oooh – I have one of these! (At least I guess it's mine – the parents left it behind when they moved out.)

I've never shaved with a blade, but my power grinder is getting long in the tooth. Would this be a good weapon for a beginner, or should I pick up one of the disposables to use while I figure out what I'm doing? (Or should I avoid the disposables entirely, and eschew any knowledge of their very existence?) Also, the blade release squeaks a bit; should I lubricate it once I've cleaned it, and if so, with what?

Oh, yes – in the same drawer I found a brush. The handle is plastic and bears the imprint "Sterilized/Rubberset Trade Mark/Made in Canada" and the bristles are creamy yellow with a brown band about halfway down. (I suspect they're natural, from the irregularities in colouration.) Is this brush likely to be good, bad or indifferent?

Thanks, all, in advance;

Darwin
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Sir Nikolas of Vendigroth
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« Reply #146 on: August 23, 2008, 01:32:13 pm »

I used a single-baded disposable plastic dealy once, then found something that didn't give me razorburn.

As it happens, that was a wilkinson sword quattro, which I used just a few times, 'til I realised I was shaving with a cheesegrater.

Eventually I got my tech and it beats the...stuff...out of the others.
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aquafortis
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« Reply #147 on: August 25, 2008, 02:32:11 am »

Strop a straight razor before shaving, not after. the fine edge left by the hone will recover its shape after shaving over time but will be pulled off is stropped too soon after shaving.

Actually honing these is a devil of a job, i use a small Arkansas stone with no water and a good deal of care; back and edge flat to the stone and wipe gently in the cutting direction of the blade with almost no pressure. This seems to build a fine burr which is deflected away from the blade in a way which a more loosely bonded (faster cutting) stone would not. Look under a microscope and you'll see it, very thin and almost flakey.

I'd hone first, then a strop on a flat paddle strop with a spot of fine polish, then my usual hanging strop and into service on the beard.

My soap of choice these days is dettol antiseptic soap, very clean and smells nice, not very lathery but it works a treat.

As an aside, has anyone else heard of J. Linhardt of Plzen, Czechoslovakia, as a maker of razors? I bought a very utilitarian, rather slim razor in Prague some years ago and it shaves absolutely wonderfully, far better than my vom cleff or the ancient nearly-a-wedge I had. Nobody seems to know anything about them.
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HAC
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HAC_N800
« Reply #148 on: August 25, 2008, 03:12:58 am »

1960's Gillette Slim adjustable, adjustable to suit the blade, and your face, great shaver, very well balanced

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Cheers
Harold


Oooh – I have one of these! (At least I guess it's mine – the parents left it behind when they moved out.)

I've never shaved with a blade, but my power grinder is getting long in the tooth. Would this be a good weapon for a beginner, or should I pick up one of the disposables to use while I figure out what I'm doing? (Or should I avoid the disposables entirely, and eschew any knowledge of their very existence?) Also, the blade release squeaks a bit; should I lubricate it once I've cleaned it, and if so, with what?

Oh, yes – in the same drawer I found a brush. The handle is plastic and bears the imprint "Sterilized/Rubberset Trade Mark/Made in Canada" and the bristles are creamy yellow with a brown band about halfway down. (I suspect they're natural, from the irregularities in colouration.) Is this brush likely to be good, bad or indifferent?

Thanks, all, in advance;

Darwin


 If you're new to double edge razors, I'd suggest a Gillette Tech if you want to start out with a vintage, mild shavers, easy to get the hang of. If you want to buy a new razor, I'd look at either a Weishi (very mild shaver, almost too mild), or a Merkur HD, which is a good razor, albeit a bit more aggressive. Lots of good advice in the forums at www.shavemyface.com.
  As far as brushes go, a badger brush is a better tool, but you can learn with a boar bristle brush (which is what it sounds like you have). As far as shaving creams/soaps, it all depends what's available in your area. I started out with Proraso, and eventually moved up to Crabtree & Evelyn, and then to Truefitt&Hill.
  Another good source of info are the shaving tutorials by mantic59 on Youtube..
Hope that helps..

Cheers
Harold

PS - My Edwin Jagger Chatsworth razor on horn and gold is on its way!.. can;t wait!

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Sir Nikolas of Vendigroth
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« Reply #149 on: August 25, 2008, 11:13:45 am »

We need pics when it arrives!

Also:

A shavin' thread came up on British Blades, and Mr. Clough directed them to this one.

Hi, guys.
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