Author Topic: Happy Thanksgiving! (Colonial Version)  (Read 1105 times)

J. Wilhelm

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Happy Thanksgiving! (Colonial Version)
« on: November 25, 2021, 07:43:06 pm »
I wish all of you who observed American Thanksgiving, a beautiful evening and blessed weekend. Since I'm not working tomorrow, I have 4 days of break.  I really didn't have time to prepare for Thanksgiving dinner, and we'll be only two people at our house, but I snatched s couple of things at the supermarket. Later, I may cook something simple for dinner. I did have a 2 lbs bag of pecans my mother sent me, so I put them to good use for brunch:

Fried egg omelette with Emmentaler cheese, smoked goat cheese, Black Forest ham, and garnished with toasted pecans.

« Last Edit: November 25, 2021, 08:57:39 pm by J. Wilhelm »

von Corax

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving! (Colonial Version)
« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2021, 08:53:50 pm »
Happy Thanksgiving to everyone who celebrates it today, and to everyone else, Happy Thursday.
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J. Wilhelm

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving! (Colonial Version)
« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2021, 09:20:26 pm »
Happy Thanksgiving to everyone who celebrates it today, and to everyone else, Happy Thursday.

And a happy weekend to all too!


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Re: Happy Thanksgiving! (Colonial Version)
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2021, 01:23:12 am »


cranberry mandarin sauce with a roll. sliced potato in bacon cheddar jack with jalapeno cheese sauce. blue cheese coleslaw. ham steak. green bean casserole. Turkey day by myself.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2021, 03:16:31 am by rovingjack »
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Prof Marvel

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving! (Colonial Version)
« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2021, 08:33:00 am »
As in prior years, since we are celebrating by ourselfs, mrs marvel and i are spreading it out.
Todya i made a sauted salmon on a fresh graden salad with a slice of organic apple pie ( lgluten free)
Tommorrow we wil baje a pair of turkey thighs in a casserol with enough fluid to keep it covered. Bird comes out nicely tender that way! And brussel sprouts (fart balls) , and an acorn squash, and more apple pie.

Thankful we are still above dirt, have a roof, heat and food!

Best wishes to all and to all a. Good night, from sugar dump….

Prf mumbles
MIGRATION to Spare Goggles under way

J. Wilhelm

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving! (Colonial Version)
« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2021, 01:34:13 am »
As in prior years, since we are celebrating by ourselfs, mrs marvel and i are spreading it out.
Todya i made a sauted salmon on a fresh graden salad with a slice of organic apple pie ( lgluten free)
Tommorrow we wil baje a pair of turkey thighs in a casserol with enough fluid to keep it covered. Bird comes out nicely tender that way! And brussel sprouts (fart balls) , and an acorn squash, and more apple pie.

Thankful we are still above dirt, have a roof, heat and food!

Best wishes to all and to all a. Good night, from sugar dump….

Prf mumbles

I might do the same. I got the the weekend off. My Thanksgiving dinner was not so interesting. I had bought a pair of nice looking beef rolls with Feta cheese and spinach at the supermarket, but when my roommate and I cooked them, they shrank to the size of hors-d'œuvres. They were cooked according to instructions, so we had to improvise. Some basil-Alfredo sauce and linguine, new potatoes in mustard sauce and slices of turkey, and we had our plates (picture below pending).

I found a small jar of zucchini / courgette flowers in brine. This is paired with Oaxaca cheese (a type of string cheese) to make quesadillas de flor de calabaza. I've been craving that taste for years, but I have to give it the right seasoning, and according to most websites it would not be more complicated than sautéd onions, Mexican parsley and chili pepper slices, all of the above inside maize tortillas and then folded in half and fried.



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Re: Happy Thanksgiving! (Colonial Version)
« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2021, 01:58:42 am »
As in prior years, since we are celebrating by ourselfs, mrs marvel and i are spreading it out.
Todya i made a sauted salmon on a fresh graden salad with a slice of organic apple pie ( lgluten free)
Tommorrow we wil baje a pair of turkey thighs in a casserol with enough fluid to keep it covered. Bird comes out nicely tender that way! And brussel sprouts (fart balls) , and an acorn squash, and more apple pie.

Thankful we are still above dirt, have a roof, heat and food!

Best wishes to all and to all a. Good night, from sugar dump….

Prf mumbles


I might do the same. I got the the weekend off. My Thanksgiving dinner was not so interesting. I had bought a pair of nice looking beef rolls with Feta cheese and spinach at the supermarket, but when my roommate and I cooked them, they shrank to the size of hors-d'œuvres. They were cooked according to instructions, so we had to improvise. Some basil-Alfredo sauce and linguine, new potatoes in mustard sauce and slices of turkey, and we had our plates (picture below pending).

I found a small jar of zucchini / courgette flowers in brine. This is paired with Oaxaca cheese (a type of string cheese) to make quesadillas de flor de calabaza. I've been craving that taste for years, but I have to give it the right seasoning, and according to most websites it would not be more complicated than sautéd onions, Mexican parsley and chili pepper slices, all of the above inside maize tortillas and then folded in half and fried.




Hooray for the weekend off!

That actually sounds great! And dont forget that for centuries meat was the condiment, and a cunning mix of veggies and starchy thingies such as potatoes, veggies, fruits, nuts, noodels, rice, corn, etc made up the bulk of the feast…

Change of plans for us…
Booster side effects continue… aches & pains and fatigue. Woof the tiredness.
Slept throughout last evening, even thru the 12 day of the NHK Grand Sumo Coverage!
Found here

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwiBzYCktrf0AhVOlWoFHRciAJMQFnoECAwQAQ&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww3.nhk.or.jp%2Fnhkworld%2Fen%2Ftv%2Fsumo%2F&usg=AOvVaw1jW2kBz79xnz_V6mjka3At

Went to sleep ar 2 am. Woke up at 5 pm. Just in time for sunset!
Woof.

So, for tnight, boiled  bratwurst and baked beans. And apple pie.

Rescheduling the turkey & etc for tommorrow. Or the next day.
Hey I can extend the holiday as long as I want , right? Whose to stop me?
Besides I already missed the Macy Day Turkey parade, so I will reply it from web archives!

Everyone knows, it is vitally important for the Western Christianized Holiday season to
Physically observe the fat guy in the red suit on parade.

Which arose from “holiday marketing increase sales” efforts
Who arose from a coca cola advertisment
Which arose from a newspaper poem
Which arose from some form of strange fairy tale
Which arose from a traditon of a saint and his moorish helper
Which arose from both a saint and a small time king
Which sort of morphed out an attempt to usurp a universal pagan festival around a well
Known and observed solar event and an addition of wise guys bringing gifts.

Wow, they could do a whole tv show about this!

Yhs
Prof Marvelling at it all.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2021, 02:03:27 am by Prof Marvel »

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving! (Colonial Version)
« Reply #7 on: November 28, 2021, 08:19:06 pm »
My Zucchini/Courgette blossoms were not that good, I'm afraid. Being cooked in brine, they're particularly devoid of flavor. I'm now sure that the best way is to cook them fresh with oil and copious amounts of onion and garlic maybe some serrano hot peppers, but most importantly Epazote/ Mexican Tea without which they won't have the peppery bite that I remember.  Alone, the squash blossoms taste faintly of the squash with a bit of a lettuce or leafy flavor. Nothing to write home about. It's a more difficult problem now, because fresh squash blossoms are not readily available.

Oh well.  Maybe by Christmas Dinner, I'll solve the problem. That is, if we're able to have a normal Christmas.

You, boy! What variant is this?


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Re: Happy Thanksgiving! (Colonial Version)
« Reply #8 on: November 29, 2021, 02:49:37 am »
My Zucchini/Courgette blossoms were not that good, I'm afraid. Being cooked in brine, they're particularly devoid of flavor. I'm now sure that the best way is to cook them fresh with oil and copious amounts of onion and garlic maybe some serrano hot peppers, but most importantly Epazote/ Mexican Tea without which they won't have the peppery bite that I remember.  Alone, the squash blossoms taste faintly of the squash with a bit of a lettuce or leafy flavor. Nothing to write home about. It's a more difficult problem now, because fresh squash blossoms are not readily available.

Oh well.  Maybe by Christmas Dinner, I'll solve the problem. That is, if we're able to have a normal Christmas.

You, boy! What variant is this?


 Allegedly courgette flowers are nice lightly stir fried in butter or  fried in a light batter

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving! (Colonial Version)
« Reply #9 on: November 29, 2021, 03:42:45 am »
My Zucchini/Courgette blossoms were not that good, I'm afraid. Being cooked in brine, they're particularly devoid of flavor. I'm now sure that the best way is to cook them fresh with oil and copious amounts of onion and garlic maybe some serrano hot peppers, but most importantly Epazote/ Mexican Tea without which they won't have the peppery bite that I remember.  Alone, the squash blossoms taste faintly of the squash with a bit of a lettuce or leafy flavor. Nothing to write home about. It's a more difficult problem now, because fresh squash blossoms are not readily available.

Oh well.  Maybe by Christmas Dinner, I'll solve the problem. That is, if we're able to have a normal Christmas.

You, boy! What variant is this?


 Allegedly courgette flowers are nice lightly stir fried in butter or  fried in a light batter

They are better if you stuff the flowers with something first and either lightly batter of crumb them before frying. A terrible lot of work, though, for something which is a bit 'meh'.

J. Wilhelm

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving! (Colonial Version)
« Reply #10 on: November 29, 2021, 04:31:43 am »
My Zucchini/Courgette blossoms were not that good, I'm afraid. Being cooked in brine, they're particularly devoid of flavor. I'm now sure that the best way is to cook them fresh with oil and copious amounts of onion and garlic maybe some serrano hot peppers, but most importantly Epazote/ Mexican Tea without which they won't have the peppery bite that I remember.  Alone, the squash blossoms taste faintly of the squash with a bit of a lettuce or leafy flavor. Nothing to write home about. It's a more difficult problem now, because fresh squash blossoms are not readily available.

Oh well.  Maybe by Christmas Dinner, I'll solve the problem. That is, if we're able to have a normal Christmas.

You, boy! What variant is this?


 Allegedly courgette flowers are nice lightly stir fried in butter or  fried in a light batter

They are better if you stuff the flowers with something first and either lightly batter of crumb them before frying. A terrible lot of work, though, for something which is a bit 'meh'.

I imagine that courgette blossom is one of those fillings used to substitute for meat during Lent season. Very quickly, I knew that a lot of flavor was missing from these blossoms in a jar. It has to be the Epazote (Mexican Tea), which most recipes include what wakes up the flavor, but the recipes have both, the Epazote and Courgette blossoms, sautéed in olive oil. You can't do that with the brined version.

Mexican Tea is a herb that is commonly used in baked beans. It does have a very strong black pepper and minty-like flavor, and similar to the effect that parsley or mint have on foods, it pulls the flavor of the dish in a very different direction. It's a great substitute when you don't want any hot peppers, but need some "bite."

I don't think that onion, garlic and even chili peppers, which most recipes include, can achieve the flavor I remember. It probably in the form of a sautée or a stew involving oil, because I remember it being somewhat greasy; the orange and green colors of the blossoms permeated the stock in the filling, and it's commonly paired with string cheese.

I'm also under the impression that Oaxaca cheese, which most people use, is also fairly tame for a string cheese. It's less salty than European varieties. The cheese is not supposed to be strong tasting, but I tried the Oaxaca cheese and blossoms together, and the cheese barely registered any flavor. I'm going to guess that what I tasted had something a bit more flavorful like Mozzarella which corresponds to Mexican Manchego (cow milk) cheese. For Americans, you can achieve that flavor with a much softer cheese called "Monterey Jack." Emmentaler is always good, but it's not typically used unless they're that 19th century migrant concoction, "Swiss Enchiladas. "

<food rant >
Emmentaler is rubbery and oily when melted - A better melting cheese is the nearly identical Gruyère which is much smoother and was well known in Mexico until Kraft came in the 20th century with the American Emmentaler (aka American Swiss) cheese, but Gruyère is actually difficult and expensive to get in the US. It's too similar to Emmentaler, so importers don't bring it! Instead they bring other European versions of Swiss Emmentaler, like Norwegian Jarlsberg. But to me Emmentaler is Emmentaler, no matter which version they show me. It's alpine style cheese.

I don't care though  ;) I'm going to make some "Swiss Enchiladas" with ham and domestic Emmentaler right now. With hot green sauce. And with a good pint of malt lager. Proscht! Salud y Pesetas!
</food rant >


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Re: Happy Thanksgiving! (Colonial Version)
« Reply #11 on: November 29, 2021, 04:59:24 am »
<food rant >
Emmentaler is rubbery and oily when melted - A better melting cheese is the nearly identical Gruyère which is much smoother and was well known in Mexico until Kraft came in the 20th century with the American Emmentaler (aka American Swiss) cheese, but Gruyère is actually difficult and expensive to get in the US. It's too similar to Emmentaler, so importers don't bring it! Instead they bring other European versions of Swiss Emmentaler, like Norwegian Jarlsberg. But to me Emmentaler is Emmentaler, no matter which version they show me. It's alpine style cheese.

I don't care though  ;) I'm going to make some "Swiss Enchiladas" with ham and domestic Emmentaler right now. With hot green sauce. And with a good pint of malt lager. Proscht! Salud y Pesetas!
</food rant >
Interesting - I'm fairly sure most if not all of my local supers stock both Emmenthaler and Gruyère.

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Re: Happy Thanksgiving! (Colonial Version)
« Reply #12 on: November 29, 2021, 05:50:36 am »
<food rant >
Emmentaler is rubbery and oily when melted - A better melting cheese is the nearly identical Gruyère which is much smoother and was well known in Mexico until Kraft came in the 20th century with the American Emmentaler (aka American Swiss) cheese, but Gruyère is actually difficult and expensive to get in the US. It's too similar to Emmentaler, so importers don't bring it! Instead they bring other European versions of Swiss Emmentaler, like Norwegian Jarlsberg. But to me Emmentaler is Emmentaler, no matter which version they show me. It's alpine style cheese.

I don't care though  ;) I'm going to make some "Swiss Enchiladas" with ham and domestic Emmentaler right now. With hot green sauce. And with a good pint of malt lager. Proscht! Salud y Pesetas!
</food rant >
Interesting - I'm fairly sure most if not all of my local supers stock both Emmenthaler and Gruyère.

And blessed you be. Advantages of living in Canada. Mexico got acquainted with Gruyère in the 19th century, no doubt, and in fact, often Mexicans confuse Gruyère with Emmentaler. Gruyère was no doubt brought by the Maximilian Empire from Austria. Emmentaler was brought from the US by Kraft, and the US got Emmentaler from Swiss migrants.

I did get American made Gruyère from Wild Boar. Too expensive, though.