Author Topic: Election Day In Canada  (Read 805 times)

von Corax

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Election Day In Canada
« on: September 20, 2021, 11:43:41 am »
Today is Election Day in Canada. If you live in Canada, and you haven't already done so, get out today and vote! Remember, if you don't vote, you aren't allowed to whine about the outcome.
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Sorontar

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Re: Election Day In Canada
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2021, 12:57:32 pm »
Do you always have elections on a working day? I know the US of A does because of the time it takes to get into town on the horse and cart, but I would have thought the Canadians would manage their elections around modern issues like that. In the Australia, the main thing working is the school bbq so you can buy a snag in bread while you wait in the queue as our elections are on Saturdays (though increasingly we are allowing early voting to be the cultural norm).

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von Corax

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Re: Election Day In Canada
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2021, 01:59:51 pm »
An interesting question which had never occurred to me. Election Day is, in fact, always on a weekday, apparently due to Canada's strongly-Protestant heritage and resultant historical reluctance to do anything secular on the Sabbath. (The Lord's Day act, which forbade retail shopping on Sunday, was only repealed within my lifetime, after much fractious debate which I clearly remember.)

Here's an Ask CBC News article about the subject.

Also, by law your employer must ensure that you have three consecutive hours free to vote, with no loss of pay, and not including hours you would have off anyway, but the employer gets to choose which three hours you get off and whether they are hours for which you would normally be paid.

Hurricane Annie

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Re: Election Day In Canada
« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2021, 11:23:31 pm »
Do you always have elections on a working day? I know the US of A does because of the time it takes to get into town on the horse and cart, but I would have thought the Canadians would manage their elections around modern issues like that. In the Australia, the main thing working is the school bbq so you can buy a snag in bread while you wait in the queue as our elections are on Saturdays (though increasingly we are allowing early voting to be the cultural norm).

Sorontar,
who is careful to talk about culture not politics in this thread

 Your cousins across the ditch in NZ  have a similar  election process. Voting on a Saturday, with early  and late voting at specified locations and online. The bulk of the results are given by 10pm  Saturday.  Alas there is no sausage sizzles

Synistor 303

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Re: Election Day In Canada
« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2021, 01:01:43 am »
Is it political to say that voting is compulsory in Australia? If you are over 18 and a citizen, you have to vote. This means Australia one of the very few true democracies, because everyone who can vote, does vote. The unemployed, those of lower socioeconomic background, educated, uneducated, the apathetic - all of us vote. So we truly get the politicians we so richly deserve. (This may be a reason we have such tight gun laws?) Although I doubt many Australians would think enough about any politician to be bothered to go out and shoot one... Our politicians don't get that 'adoration' they seem to get in northern climes... We view them as icky, annoying things that hopefully only hang around for three year without doing any damage before we get rid of them.