Author Topic: Fried Chicken Face-Off: 1911 vs 2021  (Read 1250 times)

chicar

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Fried Chicken Face-Off: 1911 vs 2021
« on: June 20, 2021, 12:32:18 am »
EFC: Edwardian Style Fried Chicken
www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLbej0adpKs
The word pagan came from paganus , who mean peasant . Its was a way to significate than christianism was the religion of the elite and paganism the one of the savage worker class.

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J. Wilhelm

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Re: Fried Chicken Face-Off: 1911 vs 2021
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2021, 07:03:54 am »
EFC: Edwardian Style Fried Chicken
www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLbej0adpKs

The video has got some good amount of history there, including the role of former slaves in the formulation of Southern American food, in this case, Fried Chicken. Good call on the subject for the new federal holiday of Juneteenth (commemorates a proclamation by a Union General upon his arrival upon the Texas island of Galveston, notifying all Texans that slaves had been emancipated).

Even though the recipe is taken from the 1911 cookbook, the correct period for the recipe is the Reconstruction Period in the US (fully within the Victorian Era), because that's when Chef Rufus Estes would have acquired the knowledge. It's quite possible the recipe is older and probably belongs to the US Civil War period or even more likely earlier in the century.

I too think that Chef Estes' recipe is somewhat on the bland side. A lot of fancy food from the end of the 19th century would seem very bland to most people from the start of the 21st century. I remember going to the original Antoine's Restaurant in New Orleans, and thinking that while the food was good, it wasn't that extraordinary. As the 20th century rolled by the art of cooking evolved quite a bit.

I think Chef Rufus Estes was heavily influenced by "modern" 19th century French cuisine, which would be in vogue at the time. The use of vegetables as a sort of flavor infusion, or marinade while throwing out the used vegetables themselves is a very French thing to do, and I don't quite agree with that practice, even though I'm throughly French in practice when cooking. That's  also a very 19th century thing to do, because vegetables were for "poor people." The only exception were Italian migrants, who had a very different relationship with vegetables as main courses. In fact, it was the Italian migrants the ones who taught the American people to eat vegetables (hence the American use of the name "Zucchini," instead of "Courgette").

More in line with 20th century thinking, I would have instead incorporated the vegetables in some other way, possibly like Portuguese battered vegetables, Peixinhos da Horta ("little fish from the orchard"), or the Japanese derivative, Tempura, along with the chicken. And it would remain thoroughly Southern American in character, such as the case of Fried Ochra which also is an African culinary influence in the South.

« Last Edit: June 20, 2021, 07:28:52 am by J. Wilhelm »

J. Wilhelm

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Re: Fried Chicken Face-Off: 1911 vs 2021
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2021, 08:25:50 pm »
EFC: Edwardian Style Fried Chicken
SNIP

Chicar: you have to see this: 18th century fried chicken with wine batter!

Fried Chicken In The 18th Century? 300 Year old Recipe
« Last Edit: June 25, 2021, 08:27:24 pm by J. Wilhelm »

Hurricane Annie

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Re: Fried Chicken Face-Off: 1911 vs 2021
« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2021, 09:03:40 am »
EFC: Edwardian Style Fried Chicken
SNIP

Chicar: you have to see this: 18th century fried chicken with wine batter!

Fried Chicken In The 18th Century? 300 Year old Recipe


 Now there is food epoch to turn into a social   trend

J. Wilhelm

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Re: Fried Chicken Face-Off: 1911 vs 2021
« Reply #4 on: June 27, 2021, 10:47:44 am »
EFC: Edwardian Style Fried Chicken
SNIP

Chicar: you have to see this: 18th century fried chicken with wine batter!

Fried Chicken In The 18th Century? 300 Year old Recipe


 Now there is food epoch to turn into a social   trend

Tricornpunk cuisine.

Hurricane Annie

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Re: Fried Chicken Face-Off: 1911 vs 2021
« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2021, 08:25:42 am »
EFC: Edwardian Style Fried Chicken
SNIP

Chicar: you have to see this: 18th century fried chicken with wine batter!

Fried Chicken In The 18th Century? 300 Year old Recipe


Tricorn punk

1001 and one things to do with hardtack and salted pork

J. Wilhelm

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Re: Fried Chicken Face-Off: 1911 vs 2021
« Reply #6 on: June 30, 2021, 09:47:39 pm »
EFC: Edwardian Style Fried Chicken
SNIP

Chicar: you have to see this: 18th century fried chicken with wine batter!

Fried Chicken In The 18th Century? 300 Year old Recipe


Tricorn punk

1001 and one things to do with hardtack and salted pork

I like that for a title.  "The Tricornpunk Cookbook. 1001 and one things to do with hardtack and salted pork by Jas Townsend and Son."

Maybe we need to message him with the title suggestion for a new cookbook (I think they already have a cookbook out there. That'd be interesting to get.

Hurricane Annie

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Re: Fried Chicken Face-Off: 1911 vs 2021
« Reply #7 on: June 30, 2021, 10:04:25 pm »


 Yes Mr Wilhelm. Townsend  could give expert advice on how to tenderise hardtack and belt leather in a life boat. Or what to do with left over cabin boy shanks.

J. Wilhelm

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Re: Fried Chicken Face-Off: 1911 vs 2021
« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2021, 01:54:02 pm »
That channel by Townsend and Son is a jewel. Wish there were others like that for other periods.

Hurricane Annie

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Re: Fried Chicken Face-Off: 1911 vs 2021
« Reply #9 on: July 02, 2021, 07:05:45 am »
That channel by Townsend and Son is a jewel. Wish there were others like that for other periods.

 I've watched several videos following links on BG.  They are great entertainment and informative.  There are a interesting videos about cooking and ingredients from other era and cultures. Though alas no dedicated channels.


Here is an interesting Viking era meal video. It's quite a nutritious meal and cooked in a practical method that would be easy to replicate.

https://youtu.be/Io18i6Pfq_g