Author Topic: Unconventional Food People Ate During The Civil War  (Read 1366 times)

chicar

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The word pagan came from paganus , who mean peasant . Its was a way to significate than christianism was the religion of the elite and paganism the one of the savage worker class.

''Trickster shows us how we trick OURSELVES. Her rampant curiosity backfires, but, then, something NEW is discovered (though usually not what She expected)! This is where creativity comes from—experiment, do something different, maybe even something forbidden, and voila! A breakthrough occurs! Ha! Ha! We are released! The world is created anew! Do something backwards, break your own traditions, the barrier breaks; destroy the world as you know it, let the new in.''
Extract of the Dreamflesh article ''Path of The Sacred Clown''

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Re: Unconventional Food People Ate During The Civil War
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2021, 06:03:32 am »
War Rations:
https://youtu.be/lAedU_Y-hgw

I knew about chicory and acorn as coffee substitutes, but the acorn has to be from a very specific type of tree as most acorns are poisonous. I tried to experiment with acorns once. Oxidation of tannins in acorns when boiling will turn water black. Just 12 peanut size peeled acorns will turn 2 cups of water completely black even after boiling and exchanging the water 5 times! Tannins are a multitude of natural substances that turn dark when oxidation takes place. Many fruits like grapes and raspberries have high levels of tannin, which is mildly toxic to the human body, which is why you get a headache when drinking red wine.

You can still get coffee with chicory as an additive from Café Du Monde in New Orléans, and they sell the ground coffee from Cafe Du Monde in supermarkets.

I've had salt pork, you can buy it at the supermarket, and in spite of the fact that it's refrigerated so it doesn't have the same content of salt as real historical salt pork, let me tell you, it's neither tasty nor pleasant in any way. The level of salt is very high. You're supposed to boil the pork in water to release and discard as much salt as you can. Then you cut it up to make soup with things like peas or beans, which are rations that US troops carried as far back as colonial times in the 18 th century (British Continental Army), so by the time of the war of independence in the American Revolution, the US soldiers would depend on the salted pork.

Preparing Salt Pork - 18th Century Cooking Series S1E5

Hurricane Annie

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Re: Unconventional Food People Ate During The Civil War
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2021, 07:53:42 am »
War Rations:
https://youtu.be/lAedU_Y-hgw

I knew about chicory and acorn as coffee substitutes, but the acorn has to be from a very specific type of tree as most acorns are poisonous. I tried to experiment with acorns once. Oxidation of tannins in acorns when boiling will turn water black. Just 12 peanut size peeled acorns will turn 2 cups of water completely black even after boiling and exchanging the water 5 times! Tannins are a multitude of natural substances that turn dark when oxidation takes place. Many fruits like grapes and raspberries have high levels of tannin, which is mildly toxic to the human body, which is why you get a headache when drinking red wine.

You can still get coffee with chicory as an additive from Café Du Monde in New Orléans, and they sell the ground coffee from Cafe Du Monde in supermarkets.

I've had salt pork, you can buy it at the supermarket, and in spite of the fact that it's refrigerated so it doesn't have the same content of salt as real historical salt pork, let me tell you, it's neither tasty nor pleasant in any way. The level of salt is very high. You're supposed to boil the pork in water to release and discard as much salt as you can. Then you cut it up to make soup with things like peas or beans, which are rations that US troops carried as far back as colonial times in the 18 th century (British Continental Army), so by the time of the war of independence in the American Revolution, the US soldiers would depend on the salted pork.

Preparing Salt Pork - 18th Century Cooking Series S1E5

Having read about salted pork  in various books on  immigration, prison transports, British navy, press gangs etc., it must have been a food of last resort. The weevils  and other crawlies writhing in it might have had more nutrition and been more palatable.

 At the end of a 6 month journey it was of an extremely foul discription. The heavy salt would have not been enough to disguise the flavour or preserve it.

E.J.MonCrieff

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Re: Unconventional Food People Ate During The Civil War
« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2021, 03:45:57 pm »
War Rations:
https://youtu.be/lAedU_Y-hgw

I knew about chicory and acorn as coffee substitutes, but the acorn has to be from a very specific type of tree as most acorns are poisonous. I tried to experiment with acorns once. Oxidation of tannins in acorns when boiling will turn water black. Just 12 peanut size peeled acorns will turn 2 cups of water completely black even after boiling and exchanging the water 5 times! Tannins are a multitude of natural substances that turn dark when oxidation takes place. Many fruits like grapes and raspberries have high levels of tannin, which is mildly toxic to the human body, which is why you get a headache when drinking red wine.

You can still get coffee with chicory as an additive from Café Du Monde in New Orléans, and they sell the ground coffee from Cafe Du Monde in supermarkets.

I've had salt pork, you can buy it at the supermarket, and in spite of the fact that it's refrigerated so it doesn't have the same content of salt as real historical salt pork, let me tell you, it's neither tasty nor pleasant in any way. The level of salt is very high. You're supposed to boil the pork in water to release and discard as much salt as you can. Then you cut it up to make soup with things like peas or beans, which are rations that US troops carried as far back as colonial times in the 18 th century (British Continental Army), so by the time of the war of independence in the American Revolution, the US soldiers would depend on the salted pork.

Preparing Salt Pork - 18th Century Cooking Series S1E5

Coffee with chicory is still available in Europe, I think.  I haven't seen it in Britain recently, but then I haven't looked for it.

Mercury Wells

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Re: Unconventional Food People Ate During The Civil War
« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2021, 10:19:30 pm »
War Rations:
https://youtu.be/lAedU_Y-hgw

I knew about chicory and acorn as coffee substitutes, but the acorn has to be from a very specific type of tree as most acorns are poisonous. I tried to experiment with acorns once. Oxidation of tannins in acorns when boiling will turn water black. Just 12 peanut size peeled acorns will turn 2 cups of water completely black even after boiling and exchanging the water 5 times! Tannins are a multitude of natural substances that turn dark when oxidation takes place. Many fruits like grapes and raspberries have high levels of tannin, which is mildly toxic to the human body, which is why you get a headache when drinking red wine.

You can still get coffee with chicory as an additive from Café Du Monde in New Orléans, and they sell the ground coffee from Cafe Du Monde in supermarkets.

I've had salt pork, you can buy it at the supermarket, and in spite of the fact that it's refrigerated so it doesn't have the same content of salt as real historical salt pork, let me tell you, it's neither tasty nor pleasant in any way. The level of salt is very high. You're supposed to boil the pork in water to release and discard as much salt as you can. Then you cut it up to make soup with things like peas or beans, which are rations that US troops carried as far back as colonial times in the 18 th century (British Continental Army), so by the time of the war of independence in the American Revolution, the US soldiers would depend on the salted pork.

Preparing Salt Pork - 18th Century Cooking Series S1E5

Coffee with chicory is still available in Europe, I think.  I haven't seen it in Britain recently, but then I haven't looked for it.

Camp Coffee
Oh...my old war wound? I got that at The Battle of Dorking. Very nasty affair that was, I can tell you.

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Re: Unconventional Food People Ate During The Civil War
« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2021, 10:25:59 pm »
War Rations:
https://youtu.be/lAedU_Y-hgw

I knew about chicory and acorn as coffee substitutes, but the acorn has to be from a very specific type of tree as most acorns are poisonous. I tried to experiment with acorns once. Oxidation of tannins in acorns when boiling will turn water black. Just 12 peanut size peeled acorns will turn 2 cups of water completely black even after boiling and exchanging the water 5 times! Tannins are a multitude of natural substances that turn dark when oxidation takes place. Many fruits like grapes and raspberries have high levels of tannin, which is mildly toxic to the human body, which is why you get a headache when drinking red wine.

You can still get coffee with chicory as an additive from Café Du Monde in New Orléans, and they sell the ground coffee from Cafe Du Monde in supermarkets.

I've had salt pork, you can buy it at the supermarket, and in spite of the fact that it's refrigerated so it doesn't have the same content of salt as real historical salt pork, let me tell you, it's neither tasty nor pleasant in any way. The level of salt is very high. You're supposed to boil the pork in water to release and discard as much salt as you can. Then you cut it up to make soup with things like peas or beans, which are rations that US troops carried as far back as colonial times in the 18 th century (British Continental Army), so by the time of the war of independence in the American Revolution, the US soldiers would depend on the salted pork.

Preparing Salt Pork - 18th Century Cooking Series S1E5

Pippin and Gimli like it...
                 
                  Salted Pork


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Re: Unconventional Food People Ate During The Civil War
« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2021, 08:33:41 am »
I'd been thinking about Camp Coffee, but couldn't remember a) if it had chicory in it. and b) whether it was still on the market.  If the latter, it deserves to be on the list of Victorian Brands still extant.  I remember it from my grandmother's kitchen, but cannot say if I've ever tasted it.

Mercury Wells

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Re: Unconventional Food People Ate During The Civil War
« Reply #7 on: July 20, 2021, 08:03:11 pm »
I'd been thinking about Camp Coffee, but couldn't remember a) if it had chicory in it. and b) whether it was still on the market.  If the latter, it deserves to be on the list of Victorian Brands still extant.  I remember it from my grandmother's kitchen, but cannot say if I've ever tasted it.

Its already on the list.  :)