Author Topic: steampunk ducttape?  (Read 5609 times)

SeVeNeVeS

  • Master Tinkerer
  • ***
  • Posts: 1641
  • Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #25 on: April 25, 2021, 04:01:00 pm »
Superglue and WD40 are my 2 go to substances for instantly fixing and releasing, always have a constant supply of both in the house available for any job that may require a little fettling.

Deimos

  • Snr. Officer
  • ****
  • Posts: 606
  • aka Countess Millicent Addlewood
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #26 on: April 25, 2021, 06:00:01 pm »
Superglue and WD40 are my 2 go to substances for instantly fixing and releasing, always have a constant supply of both in the house available for any job that may require a little fettling.
I stopped usng Superglue when I learned (from experience) that

1) it has absolutely no holding strength when shearing force is applied, and

2) after a year or so it "crystalizes" (for lack of a better descriptive term) and just disintegrates.

For permanent no movement/rock solid adhesive I use J-B Weld, a 2 part epoxy, comes in either quick set (30 minutes, working time 5 minutes) or slow set (8 hours, working time 30-60 minutes)
"Unless you’re prepared to surrender everything, don’t surrender anything."

Society: Be yourself.
Me: OK
Society: No. Not like that.

Hurricane Annie

  • Zeppelin Admiral
  • ******
  • Posts: 2768
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #27 on: May 01, 2021, 04:11:12 pm »


 Safety pins. I'm an old fashioned punk at heart

Deimos

  • Snr. Officer
  • ****
  • Posts: 606
  • aka Countess Millicent Addlewood
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #28 on: May 02, 2021, 11:49:03 pm »


 Safety pins. I'm an old fashioned punk at heart
Were there safety pins in Vic-Wardian times?
Maybe they used a lot of hat pins.....even tho' those things can be deadly  :o

Sorontar

  • Administrator
  • Zeppelin Admiral
  • *****
  • Posts: 887
  • All ideas should have wings
    • Sorontar
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #29 on: May 03, 2021, 03:33:15 am »
Wikipedia says yes, safety pins were invented in the Victorian era, so it must be true.
Sorontar, Captain of 'The Aethereal Dancer'
Advisor to HM Engineers on matters aethereal, aeronautic and cosmographic
http://eyrie.sorontar.com

Banfili

  • Zeppelin Admiral
  • ******
  • Posts: 2372
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #30 on: May 07, 2021, 11:06:26 am »
I offer up the hook & eye fastener, the press stud, and the shoe/boot button, and add my agreement to WD40 - magic stuff!
« Last Edit: May 07, 2021, 11:14:04 am by Banfili »

Hurricane Annie

  • Zeppelin Admiral
  • ******
  • Posts: 2768
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #31 on: May 07, 2021, 09:21:40 pm »
I offer up the hook & eye fastener, the press stud, and the shoe/boot button, and add my agreement to WD40 - magic stuff!

 WD - for unclogging the cogs

 That sort of carry on can really grind one's gears

Banfili

  • Zeppelin Admiral
  • ******
  • Posts: 2372
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #32 on: May 07, 2021, 11:26:19 pm »
I have not long given some squeaky door hinges a squirt of WD40 - no more squeaky hinges, and I freed up a stuck tap handle outside a couple of weeks ago - lovely stuff!

Deimos

  • Snr. Officer
  • ****
  • Posts: 606
  • aka Countess Millicent Addlewood
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #33 on: May 08, 2021, 07:23:13 pm »
Two little jars,
one containing grease (make it move if it does not want to)
the other containing some sticky semi-liquid stuff that dires out quickly when exposed to air (stops it moving when id should not)

Those jars are held in a small pocket on the  belt.

U.S. version:  If it doesn't move and it should: WD40
                   If it moves and it shouldn't: Duct tape
                   Corollary: If a hammer doesn't fix it, you have an electrical problem.   

SeVeNeVeS

  • Master Tinkerer
  • ***
  • Posts: 1641
  • Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #34 on: May 09, 2021, 01:21:14 pm »

I stopped usng Superglue when I learned (from experience) that

1) it has absolutely no holding strength when shearing force is applied, and

2) after a year or so it "crystalizes" (for lack of a better descriptive term) and just disintegrates.

For permanent no movement/rock solid adhesive I use J-B Weld, a 2 part epoxy, comes in either quick set (30 minutes, working time 5 minutes) or slow set (8 hours, working time 30-60 minutes)
I use industrial strength superglue mainly aimed at the trade and double glazing fitters, not what you buy in a corner shop or B&Q..... Soudal glue and a spray activator, I've found it glues wood, brass, copper, ceramics, concrete, most plastics, glass, clay tiles, natural stone, sea shells, home made fish tank ornaments (submerged for years now and still good), animal bone and any taxidermy skin repairs (usually raggy ears) very well and have successfully used it, combined with solvent free gripfill type stuff for a lot carpentry projects, and of course gluing my own fingers together  :P ::).

I throw into the mix, not very Steampunk, but......... Double sided adhesive tape, silicone grease and self adhesive Velcro.

Another edit....... If you cut yourself and it's a pumper, super glue applied to said cut, once dried and cleaned a bit, stings slightly but stems future flow........First used in the Vietnam War, I believe, could be wrong on that one.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2021, 02:48:06 pm by SeVeNeVeS »

Deimos

  • Snr. Officer
  • ****
  • Posts: 606
  • aka Countess Millicent Addlewood
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #35 on: May 09, 2021, 05:26:05 pm »
I use industrial strength superglue mainly aimed at the trade and double glazing fitters, not what you buy in a corner shop or B&Q..... Soudal glue and a spray activator, I've found it glues wood, brass, copper, ceramics, concrete, most plastics, glass, clay tiles, natural stone, sea shells, home made fish tank ornaments (submerged for years now and still good), animal bone and any taxidermy skin repairs (usually raggy ears) very well and have successfully used it, combined with solvent free gripfill type stuff for a lot carpentry projects, and of course gluing my own fingers together  :P ::)....
Quote

There is a Soudal USA.
Can you post a  link (or even just a pic) of the product you are describing? 

Miranda.T

  • Zeppelin Captain
  • *****
  • Posts: 1666
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #36 on: May 09, 2021, 06:58:50 pm »
(snip)
Another edit....... If you cut yourself and it's a pumper, super glue applied to said cut, once dried and cleaned a bit, stings slightly but stems future flow........First used in the Vietnam War, I believe, could be wrong on that one.

That's as I understand it too. It certainly bonds to skin better than pretty much anything else!

Yours,
Miranda.

Synistor 303

  • Snr. Officer
  • ****
  • Posts: 653
  • Zenyna Ironbracker
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #37 on: May 10, 2021, 01:22:51 am »
(snip)
Another edit....... If you cut yourself and it's a pumper, super glue applied to said cut, once dried and cleaned a bit, stings slightly but stems future flow........First used in the Vietnam War, I believe, could be wrong on that one.

That's as I understand it too. It certainly bonds to skin better than pretty much anything else!

Yours,
Miranda.

I don't know... hot, melted glue from a hot glue gun sticks to skin pretty good, and no amount of arm-waving or swearing makes it come off!

SeVeNeVeS

  • Master Tinkerer
  • ***
  • Posts: 1641
  • Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #38 on: May 10, 2021, 05:03:15 am »
I use industrial strength superglue mainly aimed at the trade and double glazing fitters, not what you buy in a corner shop or B&Q..... Soudal glue and a spray activator, I've found it glues wood, brass, copper, ceramics, concrete, most plastics, glass, clay tiles, natural stone, sea shells, home made fish tank ornaments (submerged for years now and still good), animal bone and any taxidermy skin repairs (usually raggy ears) very well and have successfully used it, combined with solvent free gripfill type stuff for a lot carpentry projects, and of course gluing my own fingers together  :P ::)....
Quote

There is a Soudal USA.
Can you post a  link (or even just a pic) of the product you are describing? 
https://www.tradecounteronline.co.uk/soudal-superglue-activator-spray-bonding-kit/

Deimos

  • Snr. Officer
  • ****
  • Posts: 606
  • aka Countess Millicent Addlewood
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #39 on: May 10, 2021, 08:25:06 am »

https://www.tradecounteronline.co.uk/soudal-superglue-activator-spray-bonding-kit/

THanks.....

Ok, just checked for it over here...no such luck..Soudal USA only carries caulk and foam stuff. :p

Will have to stick with the J-B Weld epoxy (5 minute set)
« Last Edit: May 10, 2021, 08:47:30 am by Deimos »

J. Wilhelm

  • ╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
  • Board Moderator
  • Immortal
  • **
  • Posts: 8123
  • Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple
    • NASA Dude
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #40 on: May 10, 2021, 11:04:17 pm »
I don't know how to qualify it as Steampunk, other than their outward "rivet" appearance and dark bronze color, but my go-to tool of the last two years are Hillman "pocket screws." Very sharp, self-drilling, self-tapping and very strong, they can be used to attach any two pieces of wood, plywood, particle board, engineered timber, etc.

« Last Edit: May 10, 2021, 11:33:43 pm by J. Wilhelm »

J. Wilhelm

  • ╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
  • Board Moderator
  • Immortal
  • **
  • Posts: 8123
  • Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple
    • NASA Dude
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #41 on: May 10, 2021, 11:21:40 pm »

I stopped usng Superglue when I learned (from experience) that

1) it has absolutely no holding strength when shearing force is applied, and

2) after a year or so it "crystalizes" (for lack of a better descriptive term) and just disintegrates.

For permanent no movement/rock solid adhesive I use J-B Weld, a 2 part epoxy, comes in either quick set (30 minutes, working time 5 minutes) or slow set (8 hours, working time 30-60 minutes)
I use industrial strength superglue mainly aimed at the trade and double glazing fitters, not what you buy in a corner shop or B&Q..... Soudal glue and a spray activator, I've found it glues wood, brass, copper, ceramics, concrete, most plastics, glass, clay tiles, natural stone, sea shells, home made fish tank ornaments (submerged for years now and still good), animal bone and any taxidermy skin repairs (usually raggy ears) very well and have successfully used it, combined with solvent free gripfill type stuff for a lot carpentry projects, and of course gluing my own fingers together  :P ::).

I throw into the mix, not very Steampunk, but......... Double sided adhesive tape, silicone grease and self adhesive Velcro.

Another edit....... If you cut yourself and it's a pumper, super glue applied to said cut, once dried and cleaned a bit, stings slightly but stems future flow........First used in the Vietnam War, I believe, could be wrong on that one.

Regularly used for cuts and scrapes here. Yes it was invented for veterinarian use - to repair tortoise shells and later employed to suture wounds in the battlefield. A medical grade version is still in use today for delicate sutures and also to close hemorrhaging capillaries in the brain (outside of the blood brain barrier) !!

Cyanoacrylate can be combined with dry baking soda (sodium bicarbonate powder) to multiply its strength many times while increasing its shear strength and fill gaps. Sodium Bicarbonate is a catalyst for polymerization (highly exothermic reaction) and provides mechanical strength. I haven't found *anything* stronger yet than Cyanoacrylate-Sodium Bicarbonate, but it is a hard brittle compound not suitable for applications that require flexibility. It's an old secret from model rocketry aficionados. I have also filled broken tooth surfaces as a temporary fix prior to visiting the dentist (no joke, that stuff holds-for many months of not years).
« Last Edit: May 10, 2021, 11:24:15 pm by J. Wilhelm »

Deimos

  • Snr. Officer
  • ****
  • Posts: 606
  • aka Countess Millicent Addlewood
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #42 on: May 11, 2021, 03:26:12 am »

Cyanoacrylate can be combined with dry baking soda (sodium bicarbonate powder) to multiply its strength many times while increasing its shear strength and fill gaps. Sodium Bicarbonate is a catalyst for polymerization (highly exothermic reaction) and provides mechanical strength. I haven't found *anything* stronger yet than Cyanoacrylate-Sodium Bicarbonate, but it is a hard brittle compound not suitable for applications that require flexibility. It's an old secret from model rocketry aficionados. I have also filled broken tooth surfaces as a temporary fix prior to visiting the dentist (no joke, that stuff holds-for many months of not years).

Interesting.  I had never heard/read anything about doing that.  :o
Will have to try it. Thanks  ;)

J. Wilhelm

  • ╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
  • Board Moderator
  • Immortal
  • **
  • Posts: 8123
  • Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple
    • NASA Dude
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #43 on: May 11, 2021, 04:03:13 pm »

Cyanoacrylate can be combined with dry baking soda (sodium bicarbonate powder) to multiply its strength many times while increasing its shear strength and fill gaps. Sodium Bicarbonate is a catalyst for polymerization (highly exothermic reaction) and provides mechanical strength. I haven't found *anything* stronger yet than Cyanoacrylate-Sodium Bicarbonate, but it is a hard brittle compound not suitable for applications that require flexibility. It's an old secret from model rocketry aficionados. I have also filled broken tooth surfaces as a temporary fix prior to visiting the dentist (no joke, that stuff holds-for many months of not years).

Interesting.  I had never heard/read anything about doing that.  :o
Will have to try it. Thanks  ;)

Hopefully you're not talking about the brain surgery.  ;D

Athanor

  • Zeppelin Admiral
  • ******
  • Posts: 577
  • Keep them off-balance and brazen it out!
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #44 on: May 12, 2021, 07:15:33 am »
WD40 is great for unsticking seized components, but it isn't in fact a lubricant as such. It works, for a while, but over time it seems to evaporate and you're back to a dry, squeaking joint again.

There is a huge range of commercial lubricants, many specially formulated for specific applications, from relatively thin oils such as "3-in-1", sewing machine and gun oil, to heavy thick greases used for high pressure bearings, heavy duty gears and large lathe centres. But for general shop and home lubricating, automotive crankcase oil is generally good - though it tends to have additives that help it retain its oiliness in the typically high temperature environments of internal combustion engines.

For general purpose household lubrication, ordinary cooking oil is not to be scorned. Most cooking oils seem to be based on canola oil, which is "rapeseed oil" by another name, and was specified for a great many  industrial applications in the 19th and early 20th centuries; from steam locomotives to marine  engines and machine tools. It's also cheaper than automotive oils.

Then there's tallow, which you can make yourself in the good old DIY tradition, by rendering down bacon fat, beef fat and similar offcuts. Boil it in water for an hour or two at low heat (simmering), then let it cool down and skim the solid tallow off the top. If kept in a sealed can it doesn't go bad - in my shop I have a can of tallow I made at least 25 years ago, and it doesn't smell at all; I use it for all kinds of rough jobs such as lathe centres, sliding machine ways, and hardwood bearings I sometimes have to use for one-off jobs. I understand tallow also used to be the preferred lubricant for ship launching ways, which, again, were generally constructed from hardwoods such as oak, beech or elm. Or tropical hardwoods if you're building a boat in Mexico or Guatemala.

If you keep Cyanoacrylate adhesives in the fridge they tend to last longer, it seems. I must say I've never had a problem with shear strength using cyanoacrylates; cyano' also comes in several viscosities, from water-thin - which, I find, pulls itself into virtually any well made joint by capillary action and also soaks into paper and card, creating a very tough composite material that has some of the qualities of fibreglass and can be sawn, filed and drilled, - to a thick goo which is a gap-filler in itself but as J. Wilhelm says, can be combined with baking soda or even fine sawdust to enhance its gap-filling abilities.

Cyanoacrylates don't like excessive heat; the heat from a small propane torch, or even a match, will break it down and destroy the joint. And toluene, or even nail polish remover, will unstick your fingers . . . .
Vero vobis dico, qui quaerit, inveniet eius. Et saepius, parum volet.

"Truly I say to you, he who seeks, shall find. And quite often, he shall wish he hadn't."

              - Elias Ashmole Crackbone.

The Bullet

  • Snr. Officer
  • ****
  • Posts: 219
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #45 on: May 12, 2021, 03:39:14 pm »
Beware WD40!

If there is the slightest scratch in the paint, WD40 will creep under it and the paint will come off on flakes.

Cyanoacrylates can sometimes evaporate stuff that turns plexy white.
If brute force does not work....you´re not using enough of it.

Miranda.T

  • Zeppelin Captain
  • *****
  • Posts: 1666
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #46 on: May 12, 2021, 04:43:38 pm »
(snip)

Cyanoacrylates can sometimes evaporate stuff that turns plexy white.

Also a devil for depositing on glass and misting it, necessitating scrubbing with the aforementioned nail varnish remover. Still, it has it's uses in reveling fingerprints if some ne'er-do-well has been handling some glassy substance that they shouldn't have.

Yours,
Miranda.

J. Wilhelm

  • ╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
  • Board Moderator
  • Immortal
  • **
  • Posts: 8123
  • Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple
    • NASA Dude
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #47 on: May 12, 2021, 10:57:01 pm »
(snip)

Cyanoacrylates can sometimes evaporate stuff that turns plexy white.

Also a devil for depositing on glass and misting it, necessitating scrubbing with the aforementioned nail varnish remover. Still, it has it's uses in reveling fingerprints if some ne'er-do-well has been handling some glassy substance that they shouldn't have.

Yours,
Miranda.


Cyanoacrylate can be combined with dry baking soda (sodium bicarbonate powder) to multiply its strength many times while increasing its shear strength and fill gaps. Sodium Bicarbonate is a catalyst for polymerization (highly exothermic reaction) and provides mechanical strength. I haven't found *anything* stronger yet than Cyanoacrylate-Sodium Bicarbonate, but it is a hard brittle compound not suitable for applications that require flexibility. It's an old secret from model rocketry aficionados. I have also filled broken tooth surfaces as a temporary fix prior to visiting the dentist (no joke, that stuff holds-for many months of not years).

Interesting.  I had never heard/read anything about doing that.  :o
Will have to try it. Thanks  ;)

DISCLAIMERS AND WARNING OVER THE USE OF CYANOACRYLATES

Cyanoacrylates have two or three different compositions. The original is mildly toxic to living tissue (Crazy Glue), which can be a disadvantage (surgical use), or an advantage (antiseptic on skin) depending on its specific use. When this toxicity was found out (after Vietnam War, I presume), the medical grade Cyanoacrylates were developed for use in contact with living tissue without its toxic effects. Generally Cyanoacrylates are not considered good antiseptics, but are regarded as bacteriostatic, that is they immobilize pathogens.

You should never heat Cyanoacrylates for another reason: when they break down they produce small amounts of cyanide gas. I've never heard of anyone dying or even going to the hospital due to cyanide poisoning when preparing the sodium bicarbonate mix for hobby use, or when using it as temporary tooth filler, but it's something to be aware of. Don't inhale!

So when mixing up the baking soda and the crazy glue be mindful of that. It's not like you have any measurable amount of work time anyhow, so you can hold your breath for literally a couple of seconds while you apply it. The reaction will not take place at all of there's any level of moisture in the baking soda. The reason is that sodium bicarbonate is a water soluble salt that dissociates into positive and negative ions in water. So always apply to dry baking soda, or do whatever you have to to keep the powder dry.

The reaction is exothermic and can burn you as well. I have never used more than a drop size amount of Crazy Glue in my projects, so I have never burned myself, other than a "hot wax" level of temperature. But greater amounts of glue will generate significant amounts of heat. Fire is a possibility. In less than a second, a little baking soda sprinkled over a drop of Cyanoacrylate will harden to a white somewhat lumpy piece of plastic, and over the next 24 hours it will harden even more. Not as hard as a rock, but very hard. It can be sanded to a satin finish using 800 grit sandpaper. It's snow white in color.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2021, 11:17:17 pm by J. Wilhelm »

MWBailey

  • Rogue Ætherlord
  • *
  • Posts: 8770
  • "This is the sort of thing no-one ever believes"
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #48 on: May 14, 2021, 12:13:40 pm »
Steeth, I ave nough trouble translatin Father Brown and the other Brit mystrees fer Dad when we watch 'em. 'Ess avoid th' slang and patoi, aight?
Walk softly and carry a big banjo...

""quid statis aspicientes in infernum"

“WHAT?! N0!!! NOT THAT Button!!!”

Miranda.T

  • Zeppelin Captain
  • *****
  • Posts: 1666
Re: steampunk ducttape?
« Reply #49 on: May 14, 2021, 05:36:40 pm »
Steeth, I ave nough trouble translatin Father Brown and the other Brit mystrees fer Dad when we watch 'em. 'Ess avoid th' slang and patoi, aight?

Didn't The Full Monty have subtitles when it was released in the U.S.? Or is that just an urban myth?

Yours,
Miranda.