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Author Topic: What are some early processed, imitation, or synthetic food products?  (Read 62 times)
RJBowman
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« on: November 19, 2020, 03:46:31 am »

This is inspired by the Food Timeline (http://foodtimeline.org/) that Sorontar linked to over on the Victorian Brands thread, and by a quote I recall from an H.G. Wells book (I forget which one) predicting that in the future milk would be synthesized in factories.

What are some highly processed, imitation, or synthetic foods from the era between about 18000 to circa 1920? This would include things like condensed milk, Bovril, artificial flavorings, foods invented as substitutes for other foods (Postum, for example), etc. I have this idea to create a menu or a cuisine incorporating these things;  a sort of foods of the future of the past.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2020, 08:07:03 am »

Many cocoa products are highly processed. Milk chocolate by Hershey's counts because you have to process mil into powder, you have to mucro-mill the cocoa, remove the cocoa butter, put it back into the cocoa to make the bar. Very process heavy.

Same goes for Nestle, Carnation and PET condensed/evaporated milks.

Arm and Hammer Baking soda is a chemistry wonder for the 19th. C.

Candies like NECCO are highly processed.

Maizena corn starch is very processed too.

Chicory as a coffee substitute or additive to coffee (Cafe du Monde coffee)

Cream sodas are basically a chemistry experiment:

Quote
A recipe for cream soda written by E. M. Sheldon and published in Michigan Farmer in 1852 called for water, cream of tartar (Potassium bitartrate), Epsom salts, sugar, egg, and milk, to be mixed, then heated, and mixed when cool with water and a quarter teaspoonful of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) to make an effervescent drink.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2020, 08:19:27 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

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