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Author Topic: Any way to make 3D reliefs from a 2D picture?  (Read 241 times)
cossoft
Gunner
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« on: October 15, 2020, 03:12:28 pm »

Or, can this:-



be turned into something like this:-



without actually having to carve it by hand?  Some sort of moulding/etching thing? The actual depth of relief is unimportant as long as the image's sentiment is there.  But I don't mean just something like https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photolithography. The gentle rounded 3D appearance would be nice.

I ask as I'm artistically challenged and generally useless  Sad but handy with those computer machines  Grin
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Synistor 303
Snr. Officer
****
Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2020, 01:04:13 am »

Surely that is something a 3d printer could do? Then some creative paint...
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Synistor 303
Snr. Officer
****
Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2020, 01:05:58 am »

Printed by a 3D printer in relief and do a plaster cast.
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J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
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United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2020, 02:12:18 am »

Surely that is something a 3d printer could do? Then some creative paint...

I think that the problem he's referring to is extracting the 3D information from a 2D image. You would need some algorithms to convert curved shadows into heights. You'd have to "invent rules" to make up for missing 3D information. It's much easier to do the opposite: flatten a 3-D image into a bas-relief.


This software converts 3D models into 3D bas-relief. It bills itself as converting "2D" into "3D" but I think what it does is convert 3D renderings on screen to bas-relief (not really 2-D to 3D, more like 3D to "3D light"). I haven't read all, but it looks it can translate shading into depth.
https://www.2dto3dstudio.com/index.php/software

Which suggests that another method is to create a 3D object in virtual space, convert the depth into a grayscale bitmap, then redefine the scale of shading as a measure of depth. In this other software you can choose a maximum depth (a perfect shade of black) on a bitmap picture and the software will decide what depth corresponds a given gray tone:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQ3fVmDtxAg

« Last Edit: October 18, 2020, 03:01:08 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Hez
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Canada Canada


aka Miss Primrose C Leigh


« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2020, 01:41:31 am »

There is a very old craft form that does exactly that. Print multiple copies and cut out the person’s outline and glue it to the whole picture with a thin spacer between. Then cut out their arm and glue it on the arm of layer 2 with thin spacers. Instead of the 3 layers I describe use 8 or so.   You used to find old fashioned prints done this way in thrift stores.
Google dimensional paper layering art
« Last Edit: October 18, 2020, 01:46:50 am by Hez » Logged
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