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Author Topic: 1920’s ( Actually 1912) Hamburger Recipes  (Read 243 times)
chicar
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« on: May 21, 2020, 12:38:35 pm »

Hmmmm,How Crual It Was To Discover This Video Before Breakfast:
https://youtu.be/G4U09p-TE04
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« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2020, 06:28:24 pm »

In some ways that's the opposite to how I learned to cook burgers in the '60's - while that one is deep fried with no salt, we were taught to use no oil, just sprinkle a layer of salt in the frying pan and cook the burger on that. The salt draws out the fat so the burger cooks in its own fat and juices.

No idea which is worse for you, all that salt or all that fat...
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« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2020, 11:33:04 pm »

It's all good, fat and all!
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« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2020, 11:50:33 pm »

That is basically hamburger confit. I'm not entirely sure you need to dunk it in tallow. Beef can be very fat already, it comes in grades at the supermarket.

My technique is to make the burger a bit like a meatball. I actually use spinach and an ungodly amount of onion I saute beforehand (without caramelization because both the sauteed onion and the spinach go into cooking inside the hamburger again. All that humidity in the onion and spinach leeches out of the burger, first allowing the burger to burn a bit on the frying pan, and then you cover the pan. The burger begins to boil in all its juices as they seep out into the pan. The burgers will be halfway covered in juices. After 10 minutes you flip the burgers and continue cooking close to when all the water in the pan has evaporated (about 18 minutes) and it's basically swimming in all beef fat, and for just a few minutes you allow it to caramelize (confit) in the fat without the cover making sure it doesn't burn too much.

And that is my burger method. Not 1918, but 2018.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2020, 02:42:17 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
von Corax
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« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2020, 12:54:35 am »

Woof. I could hear my arteries harden as I watched that.

Time for supper. I think I'll have butter with some potatoes under it.
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« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2020, 05:36:37 pm »



 Where is the egg and beetroot ?

 {On a sad note Burger King is in receivership in New Zealand. Farewell to the Whopper and Hawaiian Chicken }
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« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2020, 08:51:02 pm »

Egg in Hamburger, yes. But Beets?
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« Reply #7 on: June 06, 2020, 09:12:33 pm »

Egg in Hamburger, yes. But Beets?
The perfect hamburger patty:
No egg.
No beet.
No bread.
Just meat.
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« Reply #8 on: June 07, 2020, 01:06:47 am »

Egg in Hamburger, yes. But Beets?
The perfect hamburger patty:
No egg.
No beet.
No bread.
Just meat.

I still have never heard of beets in a hamburger. An explanation from Ms Annie?
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« Reply #9 on: June 07, 2020, 03:54:47 pm »

Australian fish'n'chip stores tend to offer beetroot slices (and sometimes pineapple) as an option for hamburgers. Thankfully, if you ask for one-with-the-lot, it doesn't always mean that they include beetroot or pineapple, but I have learnt to doublecheck. The lot tends to be patty, lettuce, tomato, egg, bacon, onion, thick tomato sauce (none of this ketchup rubbish).

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« Reply #10 on: June 07, 2020, 04:36:14 pm »

I use pickled Beetroot for all sorts, mainly in sandwiches.

Beets the gherkin shyte McDonalds put in their Big Mac, which on the rare occasion I purchase one, is the first thing ucked out and chucked into the nearest bin.
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« Reply #11 on: June 07, 2020, 07:23:17 pm »

It's interesting how a dish, when internationalised will be adapted to each culture. South from this border hamburgers and hot dogs are common place. But the seasoning tends to be a bit more on the spicy side, yes? There's a few cultural things that won't be mixed, especially in the "home cooking" and "ethnic / traditional cuisine" arenas, but when it comes to street or fast food anything is fair game.
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