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Author Topic: Do The Real Life Lone Ranger Was Black ?  (Read 1064 times)
chicar
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Chicar556
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« on: March 04, 2020, 05:09:22 pm »

Happy Belated Black History Month:
https://podcasts.apple.com/ca/podcast/ridiculous-history/id1299826850?l=fr&i=1000467389073
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The word pagan came from paganus , who mean peasant . Its was a way to significate than christianism was the religion of the elite and paganism the one of the savage worker class.

''Trickster shows us how we trick OURSELVES. Her rampant curiosity backfires, but, then, something NEW is discovered (though usually not what She expected)! This is where creativity comes from—experiment, do something different, maybe even something forbidden, and voila! A breakthrough occurs! Ha! Ha! We are released! The world is created anew! Do something backwards, break your own traditions, the barrier breaks; destroy the world as you know it, let the new in.''
Extract of the Dreamflesh article ''Path of The Sacred Clown''
RJBowman
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« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2020, 05:16:22 pm »

A cool story, but most likely not true.
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Darkhound
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« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2020, 04:01:16 am »

A cool story, but most likely not true.

Bass Reeves was as real as you are, and really did have an amazing career as a lawman in what were then called the " Indian Territories", roughly modern Oklahoma. He often did ride out alone and capture dangerous outlaws. However, he didn't resemble the fictional Lone Ranger in most other respects.(Mask? Trick horse? SILVER BULLETS ?!?) He was also a regular U.S. Deputy Marshal, not "the sole survivor of an ambush of Texas Rangers", which never made any sense to me. If one Texas Ranger survived an ambush, he would simply rejoin his company and report to his Captain. He wouldn't hide behind a mask and go looking for trouble all alone!
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"Stupidity is a curse with which even the Gods struggle in vain. Ignorance we can fix."
Prof Marvel
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« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2020, 10:02:18 am »

Thanks for the topic, Chicar!

from wikipedia article on Lone Ranger:

"Historian "Art Burton" postulated the theory that Bass Reeves may have served as inspiration for the character
of the Lone Ranger. Burton makes this argument based on the sheer number of people Reeves arrested without taking
any serious injury, coupled with many of these arrested were incarcerated in the Detroit House of Correction,
the same city where the Lone Ranger radio plays were broadcast on WXYZ."



But I propose that "The Lone Ranger", is an "Eastern" fictional radio show written by  Fran Striker, the show's writer in Detroit Michigan.
By this I mean that everyone involved had no knowledge whatsoever of the Texas Rangers, Texas in general or the Great Southwest at all.
They invented everything out of their own little heads. How else could anyone come up with a "silver bullet" ( I can write a small
treatise on the problems with that) and a fictional Ranger Code of Conduct that is literally impossible to follow?

One of the actors came up with the name "Tanto" and the term "Kemosabe" (the name of a summer camp in Michigan).
In some imaginary Native American language, "Tonto" was supposed to mean "wild one", but after extensive research of the over 560
recognized native American tribes in the U.S. I have not found a single occurrance of the word or name.

However, "Tanto" DOES mean "Stupid" in Spanish.

The entire thing is a whimsical Eastern Fairy Tale. for example, the backstory of how The Ranger gets his horse Silver:
"The Lone Ranger saves Silver's life from an enraged buffalo and, in gratitude, Silver chooses to give up his wild life to carry him. "

ummmmm.
What?


some speculated insiprations for the character are

- Bass Reeves, the first black deputy U.S. marshal west of the Mississippi River.
     this is based on a comment Art T. Burton (biographer) wrote,
   "Bass Reeves is the closest real person to resemble the Lone Ranger."
   Burton cites many similarities between Reeves and the Lone Ranger but few hold much water.

- Texas Ranger Captain John R. Hughes,
   to whom the book The Lone Star Ranger (by Zane Grey) -  a much better candidate:
-------
"Following the 1893 murder of Texas Ranger Captain Frank Jones, killed during an ambush by bandits, Hughes led a company of Rangers in a hunt for the killers, most of whom were members of the Olguin family. Since the Rangers led by Captain Jones had mistakenly entered into Mexico, and were across the border with Mexico when the shootout took place, no suspects would be prosecuted. The bandits were wanted for numerous crimes committed inside the U.S., which had led Captain Jones in pursuit of them. Based on a list of names supplied by early Ranger undercover agent Ernest St. Leon, Hughes and his company tracked down 18 suspects in the murder, and either killed them all in shootouts or by way of hanging, effectively ending the Olguin family's crime spree. These daring exploits of Hughes led to numerous books, including The Lone Star Ranger, and his apparent inspiration for the Lone Ranger character. "
--------

- Zorro - the 1919 fictional character

- Robin Hood

but the actual inspiration for this fun fairy tale is completely up for grabs, since the authors never said.
Unfortunately the Lone Ranger Movie and TV actor Clayton Moore got so carried away with the role, that after the shows ended
that he kept ( or made) the complete cosutme and continued making appearances ( for fee) and teaching kids "The Code Of The West"
(which never existed).


The story of Bass Reeves, however, is of the harsh reality of Law Enforcement in The West, especially
in The Indian Territories. There is supposed to be a recent mostly factual HBO movie, but I haven't seen it yet.
I leave it to the reader to google Bass Reeves, his career and story is better than the Lone Ranger Fairy Tale.
(BTW I actually loved the Johny Depp Lone Ranger film).

yhs
prof marvel
amateur history scholar of the Americas from the French and Indian War eras thru The End of The West ( 1755 - 1890 )
« Last Edit: March 08, 2020, 10:09:02 am by Prof Marvel » Logged

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RJBowman
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« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2020, 10:31:37 pm »

A cool story, but most likely not true.

Bass Reeves was as real as you are, and really did have an amazing career as a lawman in what were then called the " Indian Territories", roughly modern Oklahoma. He often did ride out alone and capture dangerous outlaws. However, he didn't resemble the fictional Lone Ranger in most other respects.(Mask? Trick horse? SILVER BULLETS ?!?) He was also a regular U.S. Deputy Marshal, not "the sole survivor of an ambush of Texas Rangers", which never made any sense to me. If one Texas Ranger survived an ambush, he would simply rejoin his company and report to his Captain. He wouldn't hide behind a mask and go looking for trouble all alone!

I wasn't denying the existence of Bass Reeves. I was stating that it is unlikely that two radio serial creators in Detroit based the Lone Ranger on him.
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RJBowman
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« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2020, 10:36:16 pm »

I have actually seen early documents from King-Trendle Broadcasting's archives; a lot of stuff about how the character could be promoted and used to promote American patriotism. Nothing about how the character was created. The people involved are dead so it's all up to speculation at this point.
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« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2020, 02:56:01 am »

Thanks for the topic, Chicar!


Small correction: "tonto" means "dumb" in Spanish, not "stupid," which would be "estúpido." And "tanto" means "much," as in "how much? "
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« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2020, 12:52:29 am »

Just had to throw this out there..... Grin

http://www.cncfirstdecaders6171.com/images/296_cartoon._FAR_SIDE._Lone_Ranger,_retired,_learns_KEMOSABE._BEST_COPY._b_w..jpg
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If you're alive, it isn't. -- Lauren Bacall

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Prof Marvel
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« Reply #8 on: March 11, 2020, 04:36:13 am »

Thanks for the topic, Chicar!


Small correction: "tonto" means "dumb" in Spanish, not "stupid," which would be "estúpido." And "tanto" means "much," as in "how much? "

Ah, thanks J, I stand corrected!

I am enthralled by the histories of both Bass Reeves and  John Hughes. Hard men who upheld the law.

none of the fictional "shoot the gun out of the outlaw's hand" stuff.

yhs
prof marvel
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Darkhound
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« Reply #9 on: March 11, 2020, 06:59:01 am »


I wasn't denying the existence of Bass Reeves. I was stating that it is unlikely that two radio serial creators in Detroit based the Lone Ranger on him.

I thought of that on my way to bed the night I replied. I extend my apologies. Actually, it seems quite unlikely that Fran Striker and company had even heard of Bass Reeves, let alone based a character on him!
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Darkhound
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« Reply #10 on: March 11, 2020, 07:04:40 am »


One of the actors came up with the name "Tanto" and the term "Kemosabe" (the name of a summer camp in Michigan).
In some imaginary Native American language, "Tonto" was supposed to mean "wild one", but after extensive research of the over 560
recognized native American tribes in the U.S. I have not found a single occurrance of the word or name.

Has anyone ever found any language at all in which "Kemosabe" means anything?
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Prof Marvel
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too depressed for words


« Reply #11 on: March 11, 2020, 09:39:12 am »


One of the actors came up with the name "Tanto" and the term "Kemosabe" (the name of a summer camp in Michigan).
In some imaginary Native American language, "Tonto" was supposed to mean "wild one", but after extensive research of the over 560
recognized native American tribes in the U.S. I have not found a single occurrance of the word or name.

Has anyone ever found any language at all in which "Kemosabe" means anything?

According to Jonny Depp, Kemosabe means "wrong brother" in the language of Hollywierd  Smiley

yhs
prof marvel
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