The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
February 27, 2020, 05:39:19 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Brassgoggles.co.uk - The Lighter Side Of Steampunk, follow @brasstech for forum technical problems & updates.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: How to: Steampunk Piston and Mainspring  (Read 202 times)
GeorgeCB
Swab

United Kingdom United Kingdom


« on: February 07, 2020, 04:36:38 pm »

Hi

I've been making steampunk clocks from old books and I've already had some excellent advice, tips and tricks from this forum (my older post is still live). However, I am hoping for some help on this. I have found a site where this guy Dmitry Bragin makes an amazing assortment of steampunk stuff (mainly masks) but also book covers. He has a couple of books with ornamentation that I would like try but I have no idea how he does it. I emailed him but got no reply - he probably thinks that I am going to steal his ideas. I'm not, this is just a hobby for me and I would like to try 2 things he has made. Firstly, he has a small piston :

(https://vk.com/bragincreative?z=photo-35428638_456239081%2Falbum-35428638_00%2Frev)

and secondly what appears to be a coiled mainspring:

 (https://vk.com/bragincreative?z=photo-35428638_406366173%2Fwall-35428638_1526). I bought a pack of watch mainsprings from eBay but that didn't work. I have tried making them using thick paper but they don't look right.

Dmitry Bragin appears to live in Ukraine and the site I found seems to be Ukrainian Facebook - https://vk.com/bragincreative.

Any help and advice, much appreciated.

Thanks

George

Logged
Gregor
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States



« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2020, 12:21:45 am »

Hello!

I looked at the links and some of the other works this guy does. In one of the write ups he states he uses polystyrene, epoxy - resin, and fiberglass.

I also suspect, and especially for the book covers in the links, that he may use a vacu-form set-up with some patterns, then he builds upon these 'bases'
with layers of either other vacu-form objects, model kit parts (one of the items on a mask looked like the radar-dish from the Millennium Falcon), and other small finding doodads.

I have this vintage gem that I use if I have to make a bunch of the same small parts, usually in plaster. The vacu-form pops out the molds faster than
silicone molding.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lCvgvWiZNe8

You will NEVER see a toy like this now-a-days, but I did have one and use it when I was like 7 years old back in the '60s (19   not 18  LOL).

I imagine he has a larger one, they are not too expensive and easy enough to make.

Lots of artistic work, I especially like his paint-weathering technique, and again, adding layers to it all, makes it interesting.

I really don't like plastic for finished product (Bakelite, phenolic, and celluloid exempt from contempt), But it really looks like that is what he did for the book covers.

Again, someday I will have to do a podcast or write up on this.

Cheers! - gregor
Logged

Could somebody Pleeease explain to my mother that it is steam PUNK not steam PIMP!?!
GeorgeCB
Swab

United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2020, 01:01:54 pm »

Hi Gregor - thanks for that. You mention one of his write up - the page I found was in Ukranian and the Firefox translator didn't work so I could only look at the images. As I said, I did email him but I never got a reply. Anyway, working with polystyrene, epoxy - resin, and fiberglass is way beyond my abilities so I've stuck with bits of cardboard - not the best but as good as I can do.

Thanks

George
Logged
Synistor 303
Officer
***
Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2020, 06:36:09 am »

Hi George. I do a lot of this kind of stuff. Personally, I think he missed an opportunity to leave the cogs and other bits in their natural colour, but they could have been plastic cogs or steel and he didn't like that look.

I can see from his work that all those parts are glued on. You can get brass cogs on eBay and/or a lot of craft shops online. You can also buy silicone moulds that make up almost anything - quite possibly a spring. https://polymerclay.com.au/search?search=steampunk&description=true&page=7 . I have a real spring that I got out of an old clock I bought on Gumtree. He has set one end of the spring in under a metal part to hold it at one end.

To set a real spring in place you would use dress pins to hold it onto the book cover then pour Aquadhere (wood glue) or similar onto and around the spring. When it is dry, remove the pins. He has then set pieces on the cover using the same type of glue - you can see the springs around the clock face are up to their middle in glue. Aquadhere dries clear and it is quite thick. Arrange your cogs and wheels etc then glue them into place.

Once dry, he has then painted the cover in a 'brass' coloured paint (antique gold it looks like to me) then he has likely gone over it with a watered-down brown acrylic paint and wiped it back to reveal the brass colour underneath. He has added dots of glue to form raised bumps on just about everything including the spine and back of the book to make it look like it has studs on it.

If you have raised parts, like the clock face he has, you would need to paint underneath where it will go before you glue everything down so you don't get a place you can't reach with paint later.

His cogs and the metal parts look genuine to me - start collecting bits now... I have an old chest of little drawers (that I restored first, I might add!) full of brass bits and cogs and tiny brass bolts, clock parts, etc. It has taken me years to get it all, but I would happily use cogs and wheels bought from a craft shop or on eBay.
Logged
GeorgeCB
Swab

United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2020, 09:26:53 am »

Hi Synistor

I've had no problem sourcing the cogs, infact both metal and card cogs are easy to obtain. What I was trying to do was reproduce his 'pistons'. I decided in the end to use the toilet roll inner card which has worked reasonably well but no where near as interesting as his (in fact a bit naff to be honest). I tried working with clay but it didn't work for me. Someone on this forum (in a different post) suggested using a quilling tool to create the springs. I made a couple just be rolling thin card and I think I go away with it - providing they are small, look realistic.

George
Logged
RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
*****


« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2020, 05:52:41 pm »

I have this vintage gem that I use if I have to make a bunch of the same small parts, usually in plaster. The vacu-form pops out the molds faster than
silicone molding.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lCvgvWiZNe8

I saw a small vacuform machine on youtube built from an old toaster oven. You can probably find instructions if you look, and it will make larger items than the old vacuform toy.
Logged
Synistor 303
Officer
***
Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2020, 02:20:29 pm »

I have a number of small mechanical type things that I got from our car repair man, also named George. I left an old ice cream container with him and when they had a small bit they had to replace, they put it in the container. 2 months later I picked up my container filled with good bits and all for free.
Logged
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2020, 02:53:13 am »

You can use plastic drinking cups (eg Solo brand in the US) to make a cool, just cut a strip and you can curl it by running the strip over a corner, like the edge of a table...
Logged

Gregor
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States



« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2020, 12:46:55 am »

Hi Again,

Going back to the pistons, at first I thought they were something like jump-rope handles, flattened on the bottom, then tube put in where the rope used to be.

From the looks of them, they have ridges that I thought might have been leather handles, made of leather washers stacked and glued one on-top of the next, then coated with resin or shellac.

They also might be handles from either screw drivers or gardening hand tools with the leather handles or just groves cut into the wood for grip.

The top ends of them look like a cap of some sort from a drink bottle or car engine oil bottle.

All of that then painted over.      Again, just a thought.   Carry on. . . .      -g
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.039 seconds with 16 queries.