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Author Topic: That 'big project' I've been banging on about for a few years now....  (Read 39507 times)
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #875 on: March 20, 2021, 06:19:29 pm »

Well, in terms of light coloured pain as far as bedrooms are concerned, for the period I might suggest having a look at beige/sand tones or a pale blue.

Or if you do want to go for wallpaper, a damask motif could well work.

That could work you know... that second photograph I posted earlier, if I went for those sort of colours split by a dado or picture rail.
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Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia



« Reply #876 on: March 20, 2021, 10:42:34 pm »

One of my bedrooms is a sea mist green, and the other is quite a nice blue - if I ever had the chance to repaint I would have the green bedroom (mine) in the same colour, and also the blue room, which is my office. The rest of the main part of the house is a sort of creamy magnolia - quite nice, overall. The big back room is the green, and front sunroom is white. All looks rather harmonious overall! I'd use the same or similar colours if I repainted. Ceilings are all white. Skirting boards and doors are stained timber, which look nice against the wall colours. I lack picture rails, which I would like to have - they are a future project!
« Last Edit: March 20, 2021, 10:44:53 pm by Banfili » Logged
Synistor 303
Snr. Officer
****
Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #877 on: March 22, 2021, 12:55:24 am »

One of my bedrooms is a sea mist green, and the other is quite a nice blue - if I ever had the chance to repaint I would have the green bedroom (mine) in the same colour, and also the blue room, which is my office. The rest of the main part of the house is a sort of creamy magnolia - quite nice, overall. The big back room is the green, and front sunroom is white. All looks rather harmonious overall! I'd use the same or similar colours if I repainted. Ceilings are all white. Skirting boards and doors are stained timber, which look nice against the wall colours. I lack picture rails, which I would like to have - they are a future project!

We added picture rails to a long ago house and couldn't believe the difference they made. Such simple things often add a huge punch of character. In this house we removed the mean and ugly 1980s skirting boards and replaced them with something much higher - the rooms instantly looked bigger. The 1980s were horrible years architecturally in Australia...
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Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia



« Reply #878 on: March 22, 2021, 02:29:42 am »

One of my bedrooms is a sea mist green, and the other is quite a nice blue - if I ever had the chance to repaint I would have the green bedroom (mine) in the same colour, and also the blue room, which is my office. The rest of the main part of the house is a sort of creamy magnolia - quite nice, overall. The big back room is the green, and front sunroom is white. All looks rather harmonious overall! I'd use the same or similar colours if I repainted. Ceilings are all white. Skirting boards and doors are stained timber, which look nice against the wall colours. I lack picture rails, which I would like to have - they are a future project!

We added picture rails to a long ago house and couldn't believe the difference they made. Such simple things often add a huge punch of character. In this house we removed the mean and ugly 1980s skirting boards and replaced them with something much higher - the rooms instantly looked bigger. The 1980s were horrible years architecturally in Australia...

My house is very late 1960s. It took the second owners in the late 1970s to destroy the lovely 60s style kitchen and put in a horrible brown laminex monstrosity instead. It's horrible, but I lack the finances to change it back! I wouldn't be surprised if they didn't take down the picture rails as well!
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James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #879 on: March 22, 2021, 08:17:28 pm »

Well, my current thoughts...

I think extending the light cream from the hallway into the master bedroom would look quite nice, however some measure of refinement or extra detailing would be introduced:
1) Putting a dado rail around the room at about 4' / 120cm above floor level;
2) Introducing a second shade of cream;
3) All woodwork to be that mahogany stain colour;
4) Above the bed I'm thinking of putting in a few small tile murals (the Alphonse Mucha ones I find quite appealing) with a dado border;
5) Replace the carpet;
6) I might be on the verge of uncovering the remnants of a hearth on the bedroom floor....
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James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #880 on: March 25, 2021, 06:56:52 pm »

With a loud thud a big thick envelope landed on the doormat this morning from the solicitors.  It's extracts of various legal papers from people who've owned the property down the years...

- The abstract and supplement of a 1929 copy of the original title deeds, the earliest date given is 3rd June 1905 and that is for a contract of sale for the land between a medical doctor and a local builder, then there are a series of mortgages and conveyancing documents from 1905, 1906, 1907, 1923, 1929, 1947, 1971, 2003 and 2013;

- A death certificate dated 1985;

- Contract of sale for a corner of the front garden dated 1991;

- An undated Architect's drawing, hand-draughted on detail paper with imperial measurements, for the conversion of the third bedroom into a bathroom (given the name of the Client this can be narrowed down to sometime between 1971 and 1991);

- A letter dated Tuesay this week confirming myself as the property owner.
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Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia



« Reply #881 on: March 25, 2021, 10:18:34 pm »

What an interesting bundle of documents, James!
I got a copy of the deed, and a copy of the the will of the previous owner - not much of a bundle! But my house was built in 1967/8 so not much of an owner history. I am the third owner.
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Deimos
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


aka Countess Millicent Addlewood


« Reply #882 on: March 26, 2021, 05:42:59 am »

With a loud thud a big thick envelope landed on the doormat this morning from the solicitors.  It's extracts of various legal papers from people who've owned the property down the years...

- The abstract and supplement of a 1929 copy of the original title deeds, the earliest date given is 3rd June 1905 and that is for a contract of sale for the land between a medical doctor and a local builder, then there are a series of mortgages and conveyancing documents from 1905, 1906, 1907, 1923, 1929, 1947, 1971, 2003 and 2013;

- A death certificate dated 1985;

- Contract of sale for a corner of the front garden dated 1991;

- An undated Architect's drawing, hand-draughted on detail paper with imperial measurements, for the conversion of the third bedroom into a bathroom (given the name of the Client this can be narrowed down to sometime between 1971 and 1991);

- A letter dated Tuesay this week confirming myself as the property owner.

That should make for an evening of incredible reading, James.
Time to relax in your blue parlour with a cuppa tea, and begin your perusal.
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Here is a test to find out if your mission in life is complete:
If you're alive, it isn't. -- Lauren Bacall

"You can tell a man's vices by his friends, his virtues by his enemies."

"Only the paranoid survive."
SeVeNeVeS
Master Tinkerer
***
England England



« Reply #883 on: March 26, 2021, 08:10:24 am »

With a loud thud a big thick envelope landed on the doormat this morning from the solicitors.  It's extracts of various legal papers from people who've owned the property down the years...

- The abstract and supplement of a 1929 copy of the original title deeds, the earliest date given is 3rd June 1905 and that is for a contract of sale for the land between a medical doctor and a local builder, then there are a series of mortgages and conveyancing documents from 1905, 1906, 1907, 1923, 1929, 1947, 1971, 2003 and 2013;

- A death certificate dated 1985;

- Contract of sale for a corner of the front garden dated 1991;

- An undated Architect's drawing, hand-draughted on detail paper with imperial measurements, for the conversion of the third bedroom into a bathroom (given the name of the Client this can be narrowed down to sometime between 1971 and 1991);

- A letter dated Tuesay this week confirming myself as the property owner.
I only received anything, deeds, associated paperwork etc once I payed off my mortgage.

Before that didn't see a thing, they were held in storage by my mortgage company and now sit in the fireproof safe tucked away in my back bedroom.
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Sorontar
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia


All ideas should have wings


WWW
« Reply #884 on: March 26, 2021, 09:12:00 am »

All of the properties I have owned were subdivided in the 1970s. They seem rather juvenile compared to your place. Do you have to establish a preservation plan to protect some of those documents, appointing a curator and place them in a sterilised, dimly lit environment.

Yeah, Aussies don't really know what is antique and what is just old.

Sorontar
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Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia



« Reply #885 on: March 26, 2021, 12:11:18 pm »

All of the properties I have owned were subdivided in the 1970s. They seem rather juvenile compared to your place. Do you have to establish a preservation plan to protect some of those documents, appointing a curator and place them in a sterilised, dimly lit environment.

Yeah, Aussies don't really know what is antique and what is just old.

Sorontar

Ahem! Some Aussies do!
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madamemarigold
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #886 on: March 26, 2021, 05:50:19 pm »

I am hoping to get husband to stop by and pick up a copy of the deed to our house in town... (it was built in 1925) but with things as crazy as they have been he hasnt had time or thought of it. (We bought it in 1987) Now, our 10acres where I am at in fishing trailer we set up for my disability I recieved the deed and packet on it. It was once part of a 400 acre track that was sold and divided and has had 5 family live on it since 1904? (I think?) including us. Has mainly been owned by banks and financial groups as tax write offs letting cattle run on it it looks like. I know we plan to totally redo house in town but there is something about being out here where deer walk right up to your window that will be hard to leave! Undecided
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James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #887 on: March 27, 2021, 10:12:49 am »

That's fascinating.  I'd like to be truly out in the countryside, but for the foreseeable future I've just got to make do with having it a short walk away.  It's nice, now the evenings are getting longer, to be able to go out and within ten minutes be in fields and fresh air.
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James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #888 on: March 27, 2021, 06:35:03 pm »

Things are still progressing whilst I draw my breathe....

1) Called the people I've ordered the doors from.  No installation date known yet...
2) The roofing people have visited and replaced several of the tiles in the bay window roof.  Touch wood, roofing and guttering now finished.
3) The new hallway light has been delivered, I'm just waiting on the new switches now.  I've also had to buy a new ladder so that the electrician can actually reach the ceiling to install it. 
4) Gravel has been ordered for the front garden and will be delivered just after Easter.  That gives me a week and a few days to get the soil down to the founding level, which has meant having to buy a wheelbarrow.

There's probably going to be a frantic burst of activity through late March and into April and then I'll need several months to gather my resources for the next big push. 
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Deimos
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


aka Countess Millicent Addlewood


« Reply #889 on: March 27, 2021, 07:27:28 pm »

...
3) The new hallway light has been delivered, I'm just waiting on the new switches now.  I've also had to buy a new ladder so that the electrician can actually reach the ceiling to install it.  
...

You had to buy the ladder for the electrician to [basically] do his job??!!!
Good golly.  Over here if one had 20 foot ceilings and the electrician only had a ladder that reached, say 12 feet, he'd have to find a ladder [somewhere/somehow] to do the job.
No way would the customer be expected to provide any tool(s) for a contractor.
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James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #890 on: March 27, 2021, 08:16:41 pm »

I chose to buy a new ladder because there are two rooms as well as the hallway with 3.-some-odd metre-high ceilings and at some point a bulb will blow and I will have to get up there myself to sort it out.  It's something that has been on the to-buy list for a little while now.  If it were only the hallway that were difficult to access?- yes I'd leave that for the electrician to sort out for themselves.
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SeVeNeVeS
Master Tinkerer
***
England England



« Reply #891 on: March 28, 2021, 10:15:28 am »

I chose to buy a new ladder because there are two rooms as well as the hallway with 3.-some-odd metre-high ceilings and at some point a bulb will blow and I will have to get up there myself to sort it out.  It's something that has been on the to-buy list for a little while now.  If it were only the hallway that were difficult to access?- yes I'd leave that for the electrician to sort out for themselves.
New ladder, new adventure. Get in the loft, man! Explore that previous no go zone.  Grin
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James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #892 on: March 28, 2021, 10:45:57 am »

I chose to buy a new ladder because there are two rooms as well as the hallway with 3.-some-odd metre-high ceilings and at some point a bulb will blow and I will have to get up there myself to sort it out.  It's something that has been on the to-buy list for a little while now.  If it were only the hallway that were difficult to access?- yes I'd leave that for the electrician to sort out for themselves.
New ladder, new adventure. Get in the loft, man! Explore that previous no go zone.  Grin

 Cheesy That's getting into 'another new ladder' territory.  This new ladder gets me safely to ceiling level and no higher, there's a yawning gulf to cross between top of ladder and attic floor.
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Sorontar
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia


All ideas should have wings


WWW
« Reply #893 on: March 28, 2021, 10:51:10 am »

The mysterious roof space may need a jetpack, I suspect.

Sorontar
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James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #894 on: March 28, 2021, 11:00:19 am »

It needs either mountaineering equipment, or a lift. 
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Deimos
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


aka Countess Millicent Addlewood


« Reply #895 on: March 28, 2021, 11:02:32 am »

Go as high as you can using the ladder, then put on the "Ultra Jumps" to get the last few feet......




« Last Edit: March 28, 2021, 11:05:14 am by Deimos » Logged
SeVeNeVeS
Master Tinkerer
***
England England



« Reply #896 on: March 28, 2021, 11:03:36 am »

I chose to buy a new ladder because there are two rooms as well as the hallway with 3.-some-odd metre-high ceilings and at some point a bulb will blow and I will have to get up there myself to sort it out.  It's something that has been on the to-buy list for a little while now.  If it were only the hallway that were difficult to access?- yes I'd leave that for the electrician to sort out for themselves.
New ladder, new adventure. Get in the loft, man! Explore that previous no go zone.  Grin

 Cheesy That's getting into 'another new ladder' territory.  This new ladder gets me safely to ceiling level and no higher, there's a yawning gulf to cross between top of ladder and attic floor.
It's not even my house and I so want to see what's in the loft, oh well, maybe when time and money dictate, get a man in to install a proper loft ladder and suitable hatch, until then it will remain a mystery me thinks.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2021, 11:25:27 am by SeVeNeVeS » Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #897 on: March 28, 2021, 03:46:27 pm »

There's plenty enough to be getting on with, without adding the loft to the to-do list  Cheesy

Today I've been moving soil out of the front garden, working on my own means that it has to be moved twice;
- from where it sits into the wheelbarrow;
- then in the wheelbarrow from the front garden into the paddock. 

Conclusion?  I'd have had a very, very short career as a navvy.  My chest was pounding after an hour and there were dots in my vision.  Still, two hour-long sessions and I've moved the best part of two-thirds of a tonne out of there, reckoned on the following basis;

1) Capacity of wheelbarrow = 85 litres;
2) Density of water = 1kg/ litre;
3) Density of garden soil = approx. 1.5kg/ litre (in-situ, damp)
4) Assuming wheelbarrow filled to 1/2 capacity* (approx. 40 litres), weight of soil therefore = (40*1.5) = 60kg per barrow load
5) Number of barrow loads moved = 12, (12*60) = 720kg = 0.72 tonnes

*pessimistic assumption, however consider the soil has air gaps and water does not, an 85-litre container filled with soil will be have a considerable volume of air in it. 
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Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
Board Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #898 on: March 28, 2021, 04:48:01 pm »

There's plenty enough to be getting on with, without adding the loft to the to-do list  Cheesy

Today I've been moving soil out of the front garden, working on my own means that it has to be moved twice;
- from where it sits into the wheelbarrow;
- then in the wheelbarrow from the front garden into the paddock. 

Conclusion?  I'd have had a very, very short career as a navvy.  My chest was pounding after an hour and there were dots in my vision.  Still, two hour-long sessions and I've moved the best part of two-thirds of a tonne out of there, reckoned on the following basis;

1) Capacity of wheelbarrow = 85 litres;
2) Density of water = 1kg/ litre;
3) Density of garden soil = approx. 1.5kg/ litre (in-situ, damp)
4) Assuming wheelbarrow filled to 1/2 capacity* (approx. 40 litres), weight of soil therefore = (40*1.5) = 60kg per barrow load
5) Number of barrow loads moved = 12, (12*60) = 720kg = 0.72 tonnes

*pessimistic assumption, however consider the soil has air gaps and water does not, an 85-litre container filled with soil will be have a considerable volume of air in it. 

I wouldn't sell yourself short there, that's an impressive amount to shift in a relative short amount of time (especially considering you're shifting it twice). Also, after a little bit of research and calculation I'd say you've not done too far off what a trained navvy would be capable of.

Based on your calculations (and an assumption of a trained navvy being able to move 12 cubic yards of earth each day) the average navvy would move just over 9 tonnes of earth each day. You've managed (by your own estimation) nearly 3/4 tonne (twice, so therefore you've actually moved 1.5 tonnes by the standards of our hypothetical navvy since they would either be shoveling earth into a wheelbarrow, or shifting wheelbarrows full of earth, rather than both as you have done) in 2 hours. So assuming you'd done a full day as a navvy, that means you've have moved about 6 tonnes over a "normal" working day (by modern standards), which a navvy almost certainly wouldn't have done, so add in the fact navvies would probably average a 10-hour shift (which would take you up to 7.5 tonnes) each day I reckon you're not far off what they could accomplished.
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I made a note in my diary on the way over here. Simply says; "Bugger!"

"DON'T THINK OF IT AS DYING, JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH."
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #899 on: March 28, 2021, 05:09:39 pm »

The problem (as I see it) is, that your typical navvy would be able to do that, day in, day out for 10 hours+ a day.  Meanwhile after an hour of it I had to pack up for two hours to recover. New respect gained, I think, for the people who built the Tring Cutting/ Woodhead Tunnels/ Chat Moss Crossing. 
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