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Author Topic: That 'big project' I've been banging on about for a few years now....  (Read 33599 times)
Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
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Rogue Ætherlord
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #800 on: February 11, 2021, 12:39:32 pm »

...
"Blue Parlour of Death" does not have a reassuring ring to it.

Oh, that sounds absolutely poetic! (in a kind of surreal way... Wink)

It does, puts me in mind somewhat of something like a dignitas (assisted dying) clinic. Albeit of a far more dubious legal status.
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I made a note in my diary on the way over here. Simply says; "Bugger!"

"DON'T THINK OF IT AS DYING, JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH."
James Harrison
Immortal
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #801 on: February 12, 2021, 06:06:48 pm »

...
"Blue Parlour of Death" does not have a reassuring ring to it.

Oh, that sounds absolutely poetic! (in a kind of surreal way... Wink)

It does, puts me in mind somewhat of something like a dignitas (assisted dying) clinic. Albeit of a far more dubious legal status.

....

Well that went bleak quite quickly, didn't it?  Undecided

This week at the pit.  The life-expired plaster was knocked off.  I've found that the kitchen, in winter, is about as warm as a morgue (need to get that fixed).
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Persons intending to travel by open carriage should select a seat with their backs to the engine, by which means they will avoid the ashes emitted therefrom, that in travelling generally, but particularly through the tunnels, prove a great annoyance; the carriage farthest from the engine will in consequence be found the most desirable.
Deimos
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


aka Countess Millicent Addlewood


« Reply #802 on: February 12, 2021, 10:46:28 pm »

...
"Blue Parlour of Death" does not have a reassuring ring to it.

Oh, that sounds absolutely poetic! (in a kind of surreal way... Wink)

It does, puts me in mind somewhat of something like a dignitas (assisted dying) clinic. Albeit of a far more dubious legal status.

....

Well that went bleak quite quickly, didn't it?  Undecided

...

If you'd only kept better track of your windows, such posts wouldn't happen....  Roll Eyes Grin
« Last Edit: February 13, 2021, 02:08:14 am by Deimos » Logged

Here is a test to find out if your mission in life is complete:
If you're alive, it isn't. -- Lauren Bacall

"You can tell a man's vices by his friends, his virtues by his enemies."

"Only the paranoid survive."
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
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Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #803 on: February 12, 2021, 10:46:47 pm »

So what you're all saying is that this used to be Sweeney Todd's house... That's interesting. And could explain the missing window.  Grin
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J. Wilhelm
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Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #804 on: February 12, 2021, 10:48:11 pm »

Is there a trap door leading to the kitchen?
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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #805 on: February 13, 2021, 12:10:21 pm »

If the previous owners didn't even have insulation put in the kitchen, what makes you think they'd have had a trapdoor put in? Cheesy
(Seriously, that room needs to be insulated this year.  I'm not going through another winter cold spell with that room being that cold).
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SeVeNeVeS
Master Tinkerer
***
England England



« Reply #806 on: February 13, 2021, 12:20:03 pm »

I have to ask, this has been on my mind since you posted the first pictures.

Would the bay have been originally sandstone? I see the head/lintels are but the brickwork looks newer than the rest, good job done using squints. where I live bays are all sandstone, just wondered if a regional thing or a necessary update for structural reasons. It can deteriorate quite badly.
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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #807 on: February 13, 2021, 12:36:21 pm »

The bays in the rest of the terrace are exactly the same; stone cills and lintels but otherwise brickwork. 
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SeVeNeVeS
Master Tinkerer
***
England England



« Reply #808 on: February 13, 2021, 12:45:28 pm »

The bays in the rest of the terrace are exactly the same; stone cills and lintels but otherwise brickwork. 
Up north regional then, thanks for the answer.
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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #809 on: February 13, 2021, 03:01:32 pm »

No problem.

Plasterer has finished his work. 





"The front fell off."





So that means now that everything is ready for me to finish off the hallway.  That's going to be fun, doing those high walls. 
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Deimos
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


aka Countess Millicent Addlewood


« Reply #810 on: February 13, 2021, 07:40:52 pm »

If the previous owners didn't even have insulation put in the kitchen, what makes you think they'd have had a trapdoor put in? Cheesy
(Seriously, that room needs to be insulated this year.  I'm not going through another winter cold spell with that room being that cold).
James, is there absolutely no insulation in the kitchen? Is it just plaster work (on whatever backing is used) and then brick?  Plaster directly on brick?
And how cold  does it get there in the winter (outside temps)?
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James Harrison
Immortal
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England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #811 on: February 13, 2021, 08:52:52 pm »

The thing with the kitchen is, half of it has another room over and the other half is single storey (being converted coal bunker or outdoors toilet).  It's the single storey section which is absolutely freezing, hence the suspicion that there's no insulation in the roof. 
As to how cold it gets?  Well, we've had a 2-week cold snap where the temperature has struggled to get above freezing in daylight hours.  Not exactly Siberia but it's hardly tropical either.
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Deimos
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


aka Countess Millicent Addlewood


« Reply #812 on: February 14, 2021, 12:59:02 am »

The thing with the kitchen is, half of it has another room over and the other half is single storey (being converted coal bunker or outdoors toilet).  It's the single storey section which is absolutely freezing, hence the suspicion that there's no insulation in the roof.  
As to how cold it gets?  Well, we've had a 2-week cold snap where the temperature has struggled to get above freezing in daylight hours.  Not exactly Siberia but it's hardly tropical either.

If the single storey section may have functioned as something that didn't require insulation (your mention of a coal bunker or privy) then are you also assuming there is no insulation in the walls also? Or is there?  
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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #813 on: February 14, 2021, 10:22:16 am »

I'm tolerably confident that the walls are insulated, being the same width throughout (you can see that it's two bricks thick everywhere).  It would have been a fairly simple thing to get some insulation in there when the conversion was done.  What would have been a bit more involved- and hence why I reckon it wasn't done- would have been to take down the ceiling in the single storey bit and pack out the roof with insulation.
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Deimos
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


aka Countess Millicent Addlewood


« Reply #814 on: February 14, 2021, 11:29:04 am »

I'm tolerably confident that the walls are insulated, being the same width throughout (you can see that it's two bricks thick everywhere).  It would have been a fairly simple thing to get some insulation in there when the conversion was done.  What would have been a bit more involved- and hence why I reckon it wasn't done- would have been to take down the ceiling in the single storey bit and pack out the roof with insulation.

Well, that was unfortunate, and not very well thought out.
After all, hot air rises, so right when you need it the most, in winter, it all rises right up through the ceiling and away it goes.  Tongue
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James Harrison
Immortal
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England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #815 on: February 16, 2021, 08:36:50 pm »

Well, the skip has gone.  Which is a blessed relief because about three hours after it was hauled away the scaffold went up for fitting the new guttering (which is going in this weekend). 

The new plaster has about dried out, which means that I can now get on with the paintwork, except I've first got to put the skirting and architrave back and that might be a bit of an issue because in some places the new plaster is thicker than the old.  I need to have a think about how I'm going to get that back up without damaging the new plaster, having skewiff mouldings or unsightly gaps everywhere. 

First order of business though is a coat of white paint on the front hallway ceiling.
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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #816 on: February 17, 2021, 04:16:39 pm »

I've got the day off work, so...



That is the front half of the hallway, finished.  I'd still got the ceiling to paint, until the coving was fixed over the weekend.  So now that that is done, on with the rest of it I suppose.
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Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
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Australia Australia



« Reply #817 on: February 17, 2021, 11:37:59 pm »

It's really looking very good, James!
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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #818 on: February 18, 2021, 08:12:19 pm »

Thanks!  Never one to let grass grow under my feet, I'm already pressing on with the next section.  The Tall Wall.  I've got the last of the wallpaper off of it and found that I can reach the ceiling using a paint roller with an extendable handle, the difficulty mostly seems to be getting the wallpaper paste off.... I can reach it to wet it down, other than that I've just got to hope that it washes off as I can't get to it with a scraper...

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Mercury Wells
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I insiste that you do call me WELLS. :)


« Reply #819 on: February 18, 2021, 09:17:11 pm »

Thanks!  Never one to let grass grow under my feet, I'm already pressing on with the next section.  The Tall Wall.  I've got the last of the wallpaper off of it and found that I can reach the ceiling using a paint roller with an extendable handle, the difficulty mostly seems to be getting the wallpaper paste off.... I can reach it to wet it down, other than that I've just got to hope that it washes off as I can't get to it with a scraper...



Scraper nailed to long shaft of wood?
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Oh...my old war wound? I got that at The Battle of Dorking. Very nasty affair that was, I can tell you.

The Ministry of Tea respectfully advises you to drink one cup of tea day...for that +5 Moral Fibre stat.
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #820 on: February 18, 2021, 11:18:10 pm »

Thanks!  Never one to let grass grow under my feet, I'm already pressing on with the next section.  The Tall Wall.  I've got the last of the wallpaper off of it and found that I can reach the ceiling using a paint roller with an extendable handle, the difficulty mostly seems to be getting the wallpaper paste off.... I can reach it to wet it down, other than that I've just got to hope that it washes off as I can't get to it with a scraper...



Scraper nailed to long shaft of wood?

I MacGyver'ed something like that yesterday for getting the paper off. Great concept but scrapers turn out to be remarkably unbalanced when secured to a length of 2 x 1 with a couple of elastic bands and some string.
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James Harrison
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England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #821 on: February 20, 2021, 04:02:08 pm »

Well, the guttering and fascia boards are now done.  In the course of doing that it was found that I had a hitherto unsuspected leak in the roof, which (luckily) could be fixed there and then- it just means that the bay window roof is now a job for another time. 

Coming inside, I've cleaned down the tall wall, so that's now ready for priming, there's another wall that also needs cleaning down but then when that has been done the upper hallway is basically ready for painting to start.  When the hall was replastered a week or two ago I've found that the walls aren't square and the architrave and skirting board will need some quite substantial packing out to get them to fit again... it's not so bad as the entrance hallway was but this is starting like another example of a project that grows legs and runs away.  I just have to take solace in that it might not look like it, but most of the more involved work has been done...
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Banfili
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Australia Australia



« Reply #822 on: February 20, 2021, 11:57:49 pm »

Keep it up, James - the end result is well worth the amount of blood, sweat and tears!
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Deimos
Snr. Officer
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United States United States


aka Countess Millicent Addlewood


« Reply #823 on: February 21, 2021, 09:20:21 am »

...When the hall was replastered a week or two ago I've found that the walls aren't square and the architrave and skirting board will need some quite substantial packing out to get them to fit again... it's not so bad as the entrance hallway was but this is starting like another example of a project that grows legs and runs away. ...

Walls are never square, floors are never level, ceilings are never flat.
Walls are only kind of square, floors are kind of level, and ceilings are kind of flat.
It's true in my house that is only 50 years old, so I think it's a safe bet to say it's also true in your 100 year old house.
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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #824 on: February 21, 2021, 11:58:49 am »

That's very true.  I've started to box-out so I can at least get the doorway architrave on, but at the moment it's a bit of a comedy of errors;

1) My woodworking clamps are just ever-so-slightly narrower than the width of the doorframe plus the boxing, which means I can't just glue the new timber in place. 
2) The plug socket in the hallway had to be taken out for the plastering, and couldn't be put back in because of a broken wire connection on the back.  So now the nearest plug socket is in the back bedroom and the extension cable doesn't reach the door... meaning....
3) I'm having to use a hand-powered drill to put in the screwholes for the new timber, and funnily enough the drillbit keeps getting stuck in the hole or else falls out of the drill.
4) The timber is just slightly wider than the thickness of the doorframe, so I either have to pare it down or accept a lip in the doorframe...

As ever, on the face of it a five-minute job becomes an all-day affair. 
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