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Author Topic: That 'big project' I've been banging on about for a few years now....  (Read 21684 times)
James Harrison
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England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #675 on: October 16, 2020, 04:04:29 pm »



Boot scraper / back breaker has arrived.
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Persons intending to travel by open carriage should select a seat with their backs to the engine, by which means they will avoid the ashes emitted therefrom, that in travelling generally, but particularly through the tunnels, prove a great annoyance; the carriage farthest from the engine will in consequence be found the most desirable.
Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
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Rogue Ætherlord
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #676 on: October 16, 2020, 06:41:14 pm »

I had a look at those, and I'm sorely tempted to obtain one (even though at present I don't have a use for one).
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I made a note in my diary on the way over here. Simply says; "Bugger!"

"DON'T THINK OF IT AS DYING, JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH."
James Harrison
Immortal
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England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #677 on: October 16, 2020, 06:48:56 pm »

I'm looking at mine and puzzling out how to bolt it down.  It needs 25mm diameter bolts, which need something a bit more than 50mm mass concrete to bite down into.  I can see this becoming a huge block of cement and some expensive fixings to secure it. 
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Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
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Rogue Ætherlord
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #678 on: October 16, 2020, 06:50:55 pm »

I'm sure it wouldn't be too hard to get hold of a sleeper end (or similar sized large lump of wood) to bolt it to.
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James Harrison
Immortal
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England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #679 on: October 16, 2020, 07:08:13 pm »

I could, but then that itself in turn needs to be set into the ground. Although actually what I could do, would be to mount it on a railway sleeper and then lose that alongside the garden path when I get around to ordering some gravel. 
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Lord Pentecost
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



WWW
« Reply #680 on: October 23, 2020, 10:45:12 am »

I'm looking at mine and puzzling out how to bolt it down.  It needs 25mm diameter bolts, which need something a bit more than 50mm mass concrete to bite down into.  I can see this becoming a huge block of cement and some expensive fixings to secure it. 

What about 'faking it' use rawlplugs and standard screws into the concrete (with repair washers to fit the holes) then glue some thing like these https://www.orbitalfasteners.co.uk/products/m16-24mm-nut-bolt-cover-cap-black-plastic-polyethylene to the top to look like the oversized rail bolts (painted green to match).
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"Any machine is a smoke-machine if you screw up badly enough"
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #681 on: October 23, 2020, 06:28:56 pm »

Nice find!  I may well resort to it.
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James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #682 on: October 23, 2020, 07:44:35 pm »

This week's task; planting a hedge. Some weedy-looking.... things.... arrived a few days ago.  I'll post a picture when they look a bit less dead. 
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James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #683 on: November 21, 2020, 02:23:39 pm »

A month after work ceased for the year and I think I can give a bit of a summary of what worked, what didn't, what to do different next time and what might be done next year. 

- Garden: the hedge hasn't died, then again neither has it exactly grown yet. 
- Stuff dragged out the house / garden: this week will be the first time in.... four or five months.... that I'm not filtering bricks/ tiles/ rubble/ bits of dead tree through the various waste and recycling bins.  I had a bonfire early this month which pretty neatly got rid of 90% of the tree branches, twigs and stumps.  The remainder then went through the bins...
- Sitting room: there are still some bits to finish off in there.  Paintwork on the timber could do with another coat, one or two of the walls the blue is looking a bit patchy, I still need to build something for the bay window.  Next year I might buy some more bookshelves and take up the main back wall with these (probably only three in height rather than five though). 
- Hallway: the bottom end of the hall needs finishing off (mainly in the ceiling where the plasterer needs to come back and address the broken cornicing).  The floor tiles still need sealing in and the threshold needs cleaning up and painting.  At the top of the hallway I've found what I think is a studwork wall that possibly needs looking at, as the plaster flexes.  Worse case that would need entire renewal, best case I guess is replastering it on one side...
- Fenestration: the doors and windows are serviceable enough but hardly in the Edwardian fashion.  I've got a few avenues to pursue for replacements there. 

So the plan for next year is aready shaping up as dealing with more structural things than simply repainting;
1) That wall in the upper hallway
2) New windows and doors
3) New guttering and boarding around the front of the house
4) Lowering the level of the patio to the rear (to below the damp proof). 

Meanwhile the reference library continues to grow, with the acquisition of Trevor Yorke's The Edwardian House Explained and Stefan Muthesius' The English Terraced House.
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