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Author Topic: That 'big project' I've been banging on about for a few years now....  (Read 21685 times)
James Harrison
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« Reply #650 on: September 21, 2020, 06:55:34 pm »



A small victory.  Now I just need to stain it. 
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« Reply #651 on: September 22, 2020, 03:51:47 am »

Nice. Looks good...very Mission Arts and Craft style.
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« Reply #652 on: September 22, 2020, 05:04:21 pm »

Thanks- that's exactly the look I was aiming for.
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« Reply #653 on: September 22, 2020, 10:54:39 pm »

James, with re:- to the radiator cover. Have you given any thought to a (mesh?) vent in the ledge, so the the heat can rise?
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James Harrison
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« Reply #654 on: September 23, 2020, 05:17:01 pm »

I did say I was going to do 'something' with the lid, didn't I? 

Must admit that kind of slipped my mind, there no funds to hand to go out and buy a vintage one, nor to buy a tool to drill a pattern through the top. 

It's open enough to the front (approx. 50%) and to the sides so the heat should be able to get out easily enough, it's just whether it gets caught under the solid top and accumulates there.  I'll see how I get on with it as it is over the next few months. 
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James Harrison
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« Reply #655 on: September 26, 2020, 12:31:44 pm »

Speaking of the radiator, I ordered the brass clamps for the pipes and they arrived yesterday, so this morning's little job was to fit them.





Much neater.  That's another little thing ticked off the snagging list. 
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« Reply #656 on: September 26, 2020, 02:42:08 pm »

Nice touch. God is in the details. So you stained the radiator cover? One idea is to buy a cylinder saw bit like the one you use for opening holes for door knobs and just drill 4 or 5 of holes. If you make a pilot hole in the center of each opening before inserting the bit it's easy enough to do it precisely. The wood might splinter a bit around the hole, but it's on the unstained, hidden part facing the radiator top. Easy to stain the hole edges. The cheapest mesh I know is a pre-painted steel mesh for gutters. It's black so you can cut to size with snips and just staple or nail to the underside of the board.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2020, 02:50:42 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

James Harrison
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« Reply #657 on: September 26, 2020, 03:01:21 pm »

Yeah, I stained the radiator cover to match the rest of the timber work.  The jury's still out whether to drill a series of holes into the top, take out a larger area and fit a brass grille or mesh, or leave it as it is.  Now that the heating has to be turned on in the evening I'll be able to make a judgement whether more ventilation in the top will heat the hallway better. 

Fitting the clamps this morning pulled the one pipe out and away from the new plaster that it was tight in against, which means that the paint needs to come out again to touch in that little area.  At the same time I can finish off repainting the pipes.  These little finishing details just beget more work, don't they? 
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« Reply #658 on: September 26, 2020, 05:00:40 pm »

Yeah, I stained the radiator cover to match the rest of the timber work.  The jury's still out whether to drill a series of holes into the top, take out a larger area and fit a brass grille or mesh, or leave it as it is.  Now that the heating has to be turned on in the evening I'll be able to make a judgement whether more ventilation in the top will heat the hallway better. 

Fitting the clamps this morning pulled the one pipe out and away from the new plaster that it was tight in against, which means that the paint needs to come out again to touch in that little area.  At the same time I can finish off repainting the pipes.  These little finishing details just beget more work, don't they? 

 Grin It is never ending work.
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« Reply #659 on: September 26, 2020, 05:31:32 pm »

Yeah, I stained the radiator cover to match the rest of the timber work.  The jury's still out whether to drill a series of holes into the top, take out a larger area and fit a brass grille or mesh, or leave it as it is.  Now that the heating has to be turned on in the evening I'll be able to make a judgement whether more ventilation in the top will heat the hallway better.  

Might I suggest a narrow rectangular hole in the top of the cover? Not only will it enable heat to rise, it would also prevent any kind of micro climate to exist in the top of the cover.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2020, 10:24:47 pm by Madasasteamfish » Logged

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James Harrison
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« Reply #660 on: September 26, 2020, 05:50:42 pm »

That's a valid point to consider; I don't want my hard work to become a colony for nasty bugs after all. 

Things generally are starting to wind down now- there's a couple of finishing jobs for the bits I've looked at this year and the front garden is probably going to get just the hard landscaping done between now and Christmas (hopefully during my week off in mid-October). 

My current aspirations for next year are to replace the guttering to the front of the house, get professional decorators in to finish off the hallway (upstairs and to the ceiling), get the dining room redecorated and- just maybe- think about more appropriate external doors and windows. 

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James Harrison
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« Reply #661 on: September 27, 2020, 07:21:10 pm »



A few days ago- before the brass clamps were fitted to the wall- but that is pretty much the overall finish at present.  I've had another go at the floor with acid this morning- and that seems to have gotten still more mortar off- but the stuff is very potent and I'm reluctant to use it again even with the door open for ventilation.  What is still on the tiles only seems willing to be removed through more mechanical means- it comes away easily enough with sandpaper- so I may yet go over the floor with a palm sander and fine grade abrasive pads, VERY carefully. 

The plaster still has to come back and fix the cornicing which fell apart a few months ago and then that of course will need painting, but other than that and sealing the floor I think this area too can now be ticked off the list. 
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« Reply #662 on: September 27, 2020, 11:54:04 pm »

Looking Great, James!

I did say I was going to do 'something' with the lid, didn't I?  

Must admit that kind of slipped my mind, there no funds to hand to go out and buy a vintage one, nor to buy a tool to drill a pattern through the top.  

It's open enough to the front (approx. 50%) and to the sides so the heat should be able to get out easily enough, it's just whether it gets caught under the solid top and accumulates there.  I'll see how I get on with it as it is over the next few months.  

You might consider raise the top by ~ 1 inch with spacers, and that allows better "natural rising flow"  out thru the edges under the top...

yhs
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« Last Edit: September 27, 2020, 11:56:45 pm by Prof Marvel » Logged

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« Reply #663 on: September 28, 2020, 12:06:39 am »

In the US, we have products like Soft Scrub and Mr. Clean Magic Erasers. They are made for areas you want to scrub but not abrade.(Such as Glass Stove Tops.) Perhaps something like that would work on the floor, but be less harsh than sanding. Its not expensive, so might be worth a try. I haven't tried it myself, just a thought.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #664 on: October 04, 2020, 01:57:06 pm »

The radiator cover has now been bolted back to the wall... after somebody nearly tipped it over yesterday.  No, that wasn't my doing.





And the umbrella and shoe stands have been moved back to their proper place after months in the dining room. 



I think those floor tiles have really come up a treat and I'm looking into resin or waxes to seal them.  I need to reinstate the missing three or four first though. 
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James Harrison
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« Reply #665 on: October 12, 2020, 06:58:04 pm »

Planned works this week....

I've got 300kg + of MOT type 1 turning up tomorrow to be used as hardcore beneath some brick pavers in the front garden.  These pavers I'm planning to use as a border edging.  So- at last- some work other than demolition is going to be happening in the front garden. 

Thursday I'm hoping to visit a local architectural salvage yard and maybe come back with a couple of quarry tiles to replace the ones which have been robbed out of my hallway floor.  Hopefully that will then leave me in a position of being able to seal it all. 
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« Reply #666 on: October 12, 2020, 08:58:10 pm »

I've got 300kg + of MOT type 1...
I'm not familiar with that designation, but I'm guessing it's similar to our Granular A crushed stone? (Either that, or it's regurgitated asphalt...)
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« Reply #667 on: October 13, 2020, 06:25:48 am »

I've got 300kg + of MOT type 1...
I'm not familiar with that designation, but I'm guessing it's similar to our Granular A crushed stone? (Either that, or it's regurgitated asphalt...)

MOT type 1 looks like what we would call 'Cracker Dust'. It packs down good and hard and makes good driveways and paths. We usually operate in square metres rather than by weight. We had 3 sq m of mushroom compost and 4 sq m of 20mm pine bark delivered a few days ago. All spread now, and that was uphill from the only place it can be delivered on our block. Still, it weighs a LOT less than Cracker Dust!
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James Harrison
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« Reply #668 on: October 13, 2020, 09:03:10 am »

I'm afraid I let a bit of civil-engineer speak in yesterday  Cheesy

MOT type 1 is clean crushed quarry stone and used largely as road subgrade- think along the lines of railway ballast but smaller.  In my professional life I also use it for construction roads and working platforms for havy machinery (large cranes, piling rigs and the like). 
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James Harrison
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« Reply #669 on: October 13, 2020, 01:41:09 pm »

12 bags of crushed rock turned up.  I only used about 7. 



First dig a nice long deep trench.  I aimed for 6" (4" for the stone and 2" for the pavers) and somehow ended up with an 8" pit. 



Having emptied two bags of stone into the gaping maw at one end, I was still 4" below ground level. So I put some of the soil back in on top, compacted it, then placed the pavers on that.  Once backfilled up level with the top of the pavers and compacted, these are going nowhere. 



And then on around the rest of the garden. 







It took the better part of three hours all told. 



And I've still got to sort out the big heap of arisings and source the gravel. 
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« Reply #670 on: October 13, 2020, 04:11:48 pm »

I'm afraid I let a bit of civil-engineer speak in yesterday  Cheesy

MOT type 1 is clean crushed quarry stone and used largely as road subgrade- think along the lines of railway ballast but smaller.  In my professional life I also use it for construction roads and working platforms for havy machinery (large cranes, piling rigs and the like). 

Oh, no. I like the engineering jargon, as long as you explain it. Looks like 37.5 or 25 mm Hydraulic Base Gravel.  Grin
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« Reply #671 on: October 13, 2020, 06:25:18 pm »

...and these small stone blocks will soon be used for an outdoor OO gauge layout?
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James Harrison
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« Reply #672 on: October 13, 2020, 07:21:19 pm »

Not in the front garden; I wouldn't trust the local youths not to nick it  Cheesy
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James Harrison
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« Reply #673 on: October 15, 2020, 08:28:59 pm »

You know those gaps in the hallway floor, where the tiles had been robbed out?



I made an excursion to a local architectural salvage yard today.  Another little job ticked off the list.  Also.... I decided I needed a boot scraper beside the front door.  I'm not keen on the sort that require holes to be drilled into the wall and the pavement (not keen on wrecking the masonry), nor on the sort that rely on a couple of small prongs that stick into the soil (how touching- the manufacturers think that soil will give enough resistance for the thing not to fall over), nor on the sort that rely on their own self weight for stability (a few kilos- the local types will have that up, away and through somebody's window in no time). 

Err, until I found this one that relies on its own weight.  http://gwr2807.blogspot.com/2012/12/chairs-become-boot-scrapers.html

At 20kg or so it's not going to shift as soon as you rest your foot against it, and anyone foolhardy enough to try and nick it is going to put their back out, or of course pick it up by the brush and get a broken foot. 

It's also a neat little nod to local history (two disused railway lines are within 5 minutes' walk, what was a locomotive running shed is 10 minutes' walk away and at the bottom of my road is where W G Bagnall used to build locomotives, not to mention this part of the town was developed to house railwaymen and locomotive engineers) and a subtle hint of some of my interests. 
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James Harrison
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« Reply #674 on: October 16, 2020, 11:19:34 am »



That's the last element of the sitting room dealt with.  One room crossed off the list in its entirety. 
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