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Author Topic: That 'big project' I've been banging on about for a few years now....  (Read 28952 times)
James Harrison
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« Reply #525 on: August 19, 2020, 05:24:14 pm »



All that is left to do tonight is a third coat on half of the steps and the mouldings.... it's taken a month but it's finally, finally, done....
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von Corax
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« Reply #526 on: August 19, 2020, 06:10:54 pm »

Looks good.
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Deimos
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« Reply #527 on: August 19, 2020, 07:29:47 pm »

Oh my, James! Lovely color and it came out extremely well! Absolutely smashing!
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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #528 on: August 19, 2020, 07:48:47 pm »

What I do quite like is that the plaster colour on the left hand wall is tonally quite close to the cream I have in mind, so it's looking like my planned colour will work. 
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Deimos
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« Reply #529 on: August 19, 2020, 09:13:18 pm »

Maybe I missed it in one of your previous posts but....What are you sealing it with (brand name)?
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montysaurus
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« Reply #530 on: August 19, 2020, 10:42:18 pm »

Came out great. You should be proud.
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Banfili
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« Reply #531 on: August 20, 2020, 10:01:16 am »



All that is left to do tonight is a third coat on half of the steps and the mouldings.... it's taken a month but it's finally, finally, done....

Looking lovely, James - well worth the time and effort!
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Sorontar
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« Reply #532 on: August 20, 2020, 11:06:11 am »

That looks lovely and matches the rest of the wood really well. Good choice.

It is 1 year since I moved house last year and the new owner of our old place (a builder) has renovated and sold it already (approx $AUD200,000 profit minus reno costs). It is amazing what a good reno can do to the value of a house.

Sorontar
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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #533 on: August 20, 2020, 06:28:20 pm »

Maybe I missed it in one of your previous posts but....What are you sealing it with (brand name)?

If they're reading this I hope Ronseal thank me for the plug  Wink
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Deimos
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« Reply #534 on: August 21, 2020, 10:25:39 am »

Maybe I missed it in one of your previous posts but....What are you sealing it with (brand name)?

If they're reading this I hope Ronseal thank me for the plug  Wink

Is it one of these products? (Sounds like a game of 20 questions  Tongue )  https://www.ronseal.com/for-home/wood-care/wood-varnish/

Or maybe my first question wasn't clear. I assumed you were doing this in two steps 1) stain, 2) seal.
I didn't look at other Ronseal products  but it occurred to me that they may have a one step product, i.e stain and seal in one application.

FWIW I don't care for one step anything, if it was made /formulated to avoid an original (and time proven) two step process.
I prime, then paint. Or I stain, then seal.

Very common example of this (ill-considered) idea is and primer and paint in one product. 
I know paint pros still prime and and paint in separate steps.
The two-in-one product doesn't quite do what it's supposed to for either "step", or doesn't do it very well or durably...."Jack-of-all-trades, master of none."   
« Last Edit: August 21, 2020, 10:37:49 am by Deimos » Logged
Mercury Wells
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« Reply #535 on: August 21, 2020, 03:38:25 pm »

Very nice work, are you going to remove the rest of the carpet?
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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #536 on: August 21, 2020, 05:33:53 pm »

Maybe I missed it in one of your previous posts but....What are you sealing it with (brand name)?

If they're reading this I hope Ronseal thank me for the plug  Wink

Is it one of these products? (Sounds like a game of 20 questions  Tongue )  https://www.ronseal.com/for-home/wood-care/wood-varnish/

Or maybe my first question wasn't clear. I assumed you were doing this in two steps 1) stain, 2) seal.
I didn't look at other Ronseal products  but it occurred to me that they may have a one step product, i.e stain and seal in one application.

FWIW I don't care for one step anything, if it was made /formulated to avoid an original (and time proven) two step process.
I prime, then paint. Or I stain, then seal.

Very common example of this (ill-considered) idea is and primer and paint in one product. 
I know paint pros still prime and and paint in separate steps.
The two-in-one product doesn't quite do what it's supposed to for either "step", or doesn't do it very well or durably...."Jack-of-all-trades, master of none."   

I'm not sure which one it is of all of those, except that it's primarily intended for external use. 

Very nice work, are you going to remove the rest of the carpet?

Eventually yes, at the moment the upper half of the carpet is staying. 
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« Reply #537 on: August 22, 2020, 01:17:26 am »

The problem with a varnish, lacquer, shellac or what have you, is that if that external cost scratches it's more difficult to repair the damage. I rather like the look of plain stain and wax alone. It's very easy to repair scratches and gouges.

It does look like a one-step stain and seal was used on those steps. It's very easy to tell. A stain alone tends to be very dull in finish and has zero thickness above the surface of the wood. Varnish will have a quite visible thickness over the wood for obvious reasons. The stain plus seal product will be absorbed into the wood, but will dry into a semi-gloss or satin finish.
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James Harrison
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Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #538 on: August 22, 2020, 10:53:31 am »

I quite like the satin/ semi-gloss finish.  It matches with the other woodwork. I'm just glad the whole blasted thing is done now!- I can get on with other bits of the hallway.
To which end; I've started staining the doorframes and the skirting boards have been reinstated.  Which means I can't use the front door for the day because I've got braces running from wall to wall keeping the boards in place whilst the adhesive sets. 
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Deimos
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aka Countess Millicent Addlewood


« Reply #539 on: August 22, 2020, 01:29:51 pm »

The problem with a varnish, lacquer, shellac or what have you, is that if that external cost scratches it's more difficult to repair the damage. I rather like the look of plain stain and wax alone. It's very easy to repair scratches and gouges....

Pax, JW but I must disagree with you about the wax.  Looks good, easy to repair, yes, but not too durable in high traffic areas.
It could work on the skirting and risers, but on the steps it would wear through rather quickly.
Poor James  would be spending a good deal of his leisure time re-waxing the steps.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #540 on: August 23, 2020, 08:56:57 am »

Yesterday was spent reinstating the skirtingboards.  This was about half an hour of activity followed by all day of being unable to do anything else because the hallway was full of bits of timber whilst the adhesive was setting. 



Like this. 

However, this morning I was able to remove them and now I have this situation...





So now I can start to stain them. 

I'm expecting a delivery of timber this week too so I'll be able to make a start on building a radiator cover.  Fingers crossed in a few weeks time the entrance passageway will be finished.  The remainder of the hall as I say is a project for another time. 
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James Harrison
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« Reply #541 on: August 23, 2020, 04:07:34 pm »

Except I can't start staining the skirting boards yet because the one stuck for about 10 minutes after being struck and then sprung off the wall far enough that I could put my finger down the gap. 

So now it's been caked with adhsive and baulked up again. 

So instead today one of the walls up the staircase has been washed down to remove the residue of wallpaper and paste before I paint it.  When the wall has dried out from its bath I can run some caulk around the ede where the plaster meets the staircase and doorframe and then wait again for it all to set. 

Whilst it is starting to look slightly less like a wreck I do hope I'm not about to enter a phase of being able to work for 30 minutes and then having to wait a day for things to dry out or set. 
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Deimos
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« Reply #542 on: August 23, 2020, 05:47:02 pm »

What is the wall made of? (I mean behind the plasterboard).
Can't the skirting be nailed down? 
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James Harrison
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« Reply #543 on: August 23, 2020, 06:01:29 pm »

Behind the skirting boards I've got plaster skim and plasterboard for about 3/4" and then solid brick behind that.  If I were to screw or nail them down I'd need to have timber blocks in the wall to secure them to, which aren't there any longer (on one side they were removed when the walls were replastered long before I bought the house and on the other I think they were removed when I had the hall replastered).  So it really is a case of using adhesive or not having skirting boards.  The plaster isn't going to hold screws or nails which means drilling right through to the masonry.  That was a fun all-day task when I was putting bookshelves up back in mid-March and I'm sure would be improved no end by now being on my hands and knees and trying to avoid radiator pipes at the same time  Undecided

It's looking more hopeful that it has stuck this second time at least but I'll probably keep the bracing in overnight again to give it the best part of 24hrs to set.   
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Deimos
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« Reply #544 on: August 23, 2020, 06:50:15 pm »

Behind the skirting boards I've got plaster skim and plasterboard for about 3/4" and then solid brick behind that. .... The plaster isn't going to hold screws or nails which means drilling right through to the masonry.  That was a fun all-day task when I was putting bookshelves up back in mid-March and I'm sure would be improved no end by now being on my hands and knees and trying to avoid radiator pipes at the same time  Undecided  ...

Oh, wow....Not fun.   You know, it's always something.... Tongue
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James Harrison
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« Reply #545 on: August 23, 2020, 06:59:32 pm »

I'm gaining an irrational... not exactly hatred but... something, toward this house.  Everytime I try to do something it has to be a fight.  I'm still hopeful, all told, that once the skirting boards have been wrestled back into place I am then on the home straight, even if that does take a little while.  It's pretty much 'just' cleaning things up and painting, once they're fixed. 
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Deimos
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« Reply #546 on: August 23, 2020, 07:09:55 pm »

I'm gaining an irrational... not exactly hatred but... something, toward this house.  Everytime I try to do something it has to be a fight.  I'm still hopeful, all told, that once the skirting boards have been wrestled back into place I am then on the home straight, even if that does take a little while.  It's pretty much 'just' cleaning things up and painting, once they're fixed. 

"...once they're fixed."

Aye, there's the rub.   "Many a slip 'twixt the cup and the lip."   Wink
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James Harrison
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« Reply #547 on: August 23, 2020, 07:22:05 pm »

Well, yesterday marked 6 months since I moved in.  And I've gone from 'how hard can it be?' to being just one more setback away from burning the ****-er down and walking away.  Hence why, once the entrance hall is sorted, I'm planning to leave it until next year and go away and do something else in the meantime.  Probably ooh and ahh over photographs of Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau and Edwardian interiors in glossy coffeetable-type books and come back with the wonderful idea of squeezing a Mackintosh tearoom into a north-facing 12' x 9' room...

 
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Deimos
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« Reply #548 on: August 23, 2020, 07:51:33 pm »

Well, yesterday marked 6 months since I moved in.  And I've gone from 'how hard can it be?' to being just one more setback away from burning the ****-er down and walking away.  Hence why, once the entrance hall is sorted, I'm planning to leave it until next year and go away and do something else in the meantime.  Probably ooh and ahh over photographs of Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau and Edwardian interiors in glossy coffeetable-type books and come back with the wonderful idea of squeezing a Mackintosh tearoom into a north-facing 12' x 9' room...

Please tell me your "How hard can it be?"  was only a tongue-in-cheek  musing and not your real opinion about fixing up your place...Please tell me that.
Because if you really did think it would not be, at the very least, incredibly exasperating, I would have to think you have lived  a very sheltered life.

                                                Murphy's Law and Its Corollaries

                          Anything that can go wrong will go wrong

                          If there is a possibilty of several things going wrong, the one that will cause the most damage will be the one to go wrong.
                          Corollary: If there is a worse time for something to go wrong, it will happen then.

                          If anything simply cannot go wrong, it will anyway.

                          If you perceive that there are four possible ways in which a procedure can go wrong, and circumvent these, then a fifth way, unprepared for, will promptly develop.

                          Left to themselves, things tend to go from bad to worse.

                          If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something.

                          Nature always sides with the hidden flaw.
                      
                          Mother nature is a bitch.

                          It is impossible to make anything foolproof because fools are so ingenious.

                          Whenever you set out to do something, something else must be done first.

                          Every solution spawns new problems.

                          Murphy's Law of Thermodynamics: Things get worse under pressure.

                          Murphy's Constant: Matter will be damaged in direct proportion to its value

                          Quantization Revision of Murphy's Laws: Everything goes wrong all at once.

                          The Murphy Philosophy: Smile . . . tomorrow will be worse.

                          In sum: Murphy was an optimist


                          
« Last Edit: August 23, 2020, 07:53:25 pm by Deimos » Logged
James Harrison
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« Reply #549 on: August 23, 2020, 07:58:32 pm »

It was very much tongue-in-cheek Cheesy  I could see that there would be a fair amount of fixing things needed when I first viewed the house.  And then when I moved in and found that in the intervening three months the previous owners had done some more damage (a door hanging off the wall and another that gained broken glass and bits of joinery that suddenly needed fixing). 

It's more the things that have either gotten broken trying to fix something else (radiator flooding #2), or that have gotten broken because I got bored at the weekend (radiator flooding #1), or that have been uncovered and been immediately condemned (entrance hall plastering), or have simply broken because obviously they got bored of working (boiler, cooker) that have sapped my will to try and get more done this year. 
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