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Author Topic: That 'big project' I've been banging on about for a few years now....  (Read 32496 times)
SeVeNeVeS
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« Reply #350 on: July 04, 2020, 02:35:32 pm »

Yeah, that's been suggested and although I usually insist on honesty with materials I think with things like guttering you also have to consider the maintenance aspect.  I'm waiting on the quote at the moment for cast iron and if it is on the steep side I'll reconsider plastic.  I've already agreed to a timber-appearance plastic fascia, so-watch this space.  
Light oak to match the windows? you can get a lighter colour called Irish oak, I helped fit a full house of windows with black monkey tail handles a few weeks ago, does look very nice. Possibly more cottagey than town house. Undecided

 
« Last Edit: July 04, 2020, 02:40:01 pm by SeVeNeVeS » Logged

James Harrison
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« Reply #351 on: July 04, 2020, 02:40:21 pm »

Sorry, not an oak colour, it's dark grey / black but it has a timber grain effect on it. 
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SeVeNeVeS
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England England



« Reply #352 on: July 04, 2020, 02:55:53 pm »

Anthracite? I hate it, where windows are involved, seems my city is turning grey in both windows and paint, everyone is going down this road, grey of various shades are taking over the world. Are there more than 50?........... The answer is yes.  Tongue

?
« Last Edit: July 04, 2020, 03:01:16 pm by SeVeNeVeS » Logged
James Harrison
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« Reply #353 on: July 04, 2020, 03:01:41 pm »

I have plans for the windows and doors but that is waiting on having the disposable income to spend.
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SeVeNeVeS
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« Reply #354 on: July 04, 2020, 03:19:45 pm »

Let me guess, composite door, I would not have one if you payed me, been fitting these for years, and not really very good, if you do Be careful, Trojan hinges are a must and steel in the frame, more adjustment for the future, when the wieight of the thing makes it want to drop.

With the windows, make sure each habitable room with only one entrance has a fire escape, not just a top opener, at the mommemt looking at the pictures, you are pretty much going to fry unless you sleep with a very big hammer. Wink
« Last Edit: July 04, 2020, 03:31:20 pm by SeVeNeVeS » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #355 on: July 04, 2020, 05:13:06 pm »

Anthracite? I hate it, where windows are involved, seems my city is turning grey in both windows and paint, everyone is going down this road, grey of various shades are taking over the world. Are there more than 50?........... The answer is yes.  Tongue

?

I thought that was just a phenomenon on this side of the pond. What the heck is going on? Whole buildings and houses of all sizes painted on dark charcoal gray all over. At first, I thought it was weathering or some sort of insulation. I thought to myself "heh! The owner got tired of the leaks and just asked the roofing guys to cover the whole house in tar." But the paint never came on.

Then I saw a brand new house be erected in that color. To their credit, they chose to contrast with white moulding and an all snow-white second storey with plastic siding  Roll Eyes a new two storey black house on an all post WWII single storey 1950/60s bungalows neighborhood with bright colours, sticks out like a sore thumb. Then I saw one, two, three old 70s houses go charcoal, painted all near-black, no detail whatsoever.

Is this a "stealth fad"? Or some sort of Borg Collective phenomenon? People preparing for the 2nd US Civil War (visibility, you know. Damn Yankees!)? Maybe it's Covid-19, makes people go color-blind and averse to light. Large 1980s office buildings originally in khaki and light tan with tinted windows, now nearly all black (which looks far worse than even the 1980s tanned brutalist structure ever did).  Huh

PS. If I see the Mexicans paint over their primary colours /Native American colours mid - century Barragán buildings in Anthracite, then I'll believe something very wrong is happening to people and we will be taken over by alien forces. .
« Last Edit: July 04, 2020, 05:28:25 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

James Harrison
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« Reply #356 on: July 04, 2020, 05:36:56 pm »

I was thinking more along the lines of having a proper wooden front door and timber sash windows.  The ones at the moment are serviceable enough but really not in keeping with the style.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #357 on: July 04, 2020, 07:23:47 pm »

Progres report for the day. 
1) Plasterer visited and condemned the entrance hallway.
2) The loose floor tiles in the entrance hallway have been relaid (tomorrow's job will most likely be to grout them).
3) The plastic trim/ reveal around the front door has been removed. 
4) The longest skirting board in hallway (approx. 11' 6") has been taken back to bare timber for the most part. 
5) A few paint tester pots have been put on the bare plaster in the hallway to decide on a colour.
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SeVeNeVeS
Master Tinkerer
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England England



« Reply #358 on: July 05, 2020, 08:32:18 am »

I was thinking more along the lines of having a proper wooden front door and timber sash windows.  The ones at the moment are serviceable enough but really not in keeping with the style.
Eurocell vertical sliders are a good qaulity product, not sure of colour options available, I've only fitted white, maybe something to look into, same effect with less maintenance than wooden box sashes.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #359 on: July 05, 2020, 09:36:20 am »

I was thinking more along the lines of having a proper wooden front door and timber sash windows.  The ones at the moment are serviceable enough but really not in keeping with the style.
Eurocell vertical sliders are a good qaulity product, not sure of colour options available, I've only fitted white, maybe something to look into, same effect with less maintenance than wooden box sashes.

Thanks for the heads-up, I'll look into it.
I was thinking more along the lines of having a proper wooden front door and timber sash windows.  The ones at the moment are serviceable enough but really not in keeping with the style.
Eurocell vertical sliders are a good qaulity product, not sure of colour options available, I've only fitted white, maybe something to look into, same effect with less maintenance than wooden box sashes.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #360 on: July 05, 2020, 12:02:07 pm »

This is what has been achieved in (so far) two and a half days of holiday....





The plastic internal trin around the front door has been taken down in readiness for the plasterer to box it out properly.  Note the 'that'll do' brickwork and the timber lintel over the door.  I've had an experimental prod at this and it's solid enough, though if it were rotten are we really expecting a bit of uPVC was holding the house up?





I've broken the back of sanding down the skirting boards.  I regard these two, the longest and the shortest, as done.  I've now reached a point of diminishing returns where the effort to remove the last scraps of paint won't be rewarded in the overall finish, so these are about ready for washing down and staining / varnishing.  The third of them has had about half of the paint removed but I think would benefit from another round of paint stripper before breaking out the stanley knife, wire wool and sand paper.  When that third board is done there are still two doorframes and a little bit of board still in situ to address. 
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SeVeNeVeS
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« Reply #361 on: July 05, 2020, 02:19:03 pm »

I would say originally those bricks around the door would have been timber lined and an architrave to the plaster, may I suggest ripping off the remaining plastic trim ,with a sturdy and sharp scraper and hammer.
Do this before the plasterer. those skirting boards look like replacements, available from  wickes, so time spent on stripping or just buy new?.

You intend replacing the door anyway so no harm done.

The last photo suggests a little damp in the bottom corner, or is that residue from soaking wallpaper?
« Last Edit: July 05, 2020, 02:38:36 pm by SeVeNeVeS » Logged
James Harrison
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« Reply #362 on: July 05, 2020, 03:20:30 pm »

That patch I interpret as staining, possibly from wallpaper paste- I've got a few areas where something sticky has been on the wall and left dark brown patches like that.  I'm struggling to see how it could be damp, as the plasterboard is not physically attached to the wall (tap it, it's hollow and it shifts).  So I'm reasonably confident it's not something wicking out from inside the wall. 

The trim that's still in place is very firmly siliconed in, with the waterproof stuff.  I'm of the opinion that attempts to remove it right now would result in either a hole where the door used to be, or the weather getting in.  The door is on the list for renewals but it's far, far down that list.  As in, two or three years away if not longer. 

Skirting boards- yes, I've been looking at those on the Wickes website and they are practically identical.  Replacing them would have saved me a few hours of sanding and stripping but at a cost, firstly of buying them and then paying somebody to cut them to size.  Meanwhile I've got some here that already fit and just needed a few hours of elbow grease (and this coming weekend I've had a lot of spare time to kill). 

In fact, except for taking paint off the sitting room and dining room doorways, I think I've about taken the hall as far as I can for the moment:

-Floor tiles have been exposed, cleaned up and relaid where necessary;
-Skirtings have been sanded back to bare wood, need to be stained or varnished;
-Chosen the colour for the walls;
-Plasterer has been and now I'm waiting on a quote and a date from him for replastering the walls. 
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James Harrison
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« Reply #363 on: July 06, 2020, 07:46:23 pm »

Progress for the day....

- Guttering contractor came back with a price for iron gutters.  When I came around, I asked for a quote in plastic.  Fascia is confirmed as black ash ogee moulding.   
- Plastering contractor gave a price for replastering the entrance hallway, however this can't be done yet because plaster can't be bought for ready money right now.  (Thank you very much damnable plague). 
- Plumber is booked in to take down the hallway radiator preparatory to replastering for later this week.  Also to service the boiler, which has this week taken to shutting itself down as soon as any demand is made for hot water.
- I've bought a paint scraper and set-to on the sitting room/ entrance hall doorway.  Brilliant; in half an hour this evening I've got more old paint off than I had in three or four hours of scratching at it with putty knives this afternoon. 

The plan for this week remains to take all skirting boards and doorways in the hall back to bare timber. 
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Deimos
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« Reply #364 on: July 06, 2020, 08:51:06 pm »

Progress for the day....

- Guttering contractor came back with a price for iron gutters.  When I came around, I asked for a quote in plastic. ...

Back when you mentioned that you were considering iron gutters I didn't say anything.
Rather, I  decided to position myself behind you to catch you when you heard the quote.
So, iron or plastic...those are the only two options?
I may be misunderstanding UK terminology for this, but are iron gutters really iron or are they galvanized (zinc plated) steel?
And no aluminium? Gutters in the US are often made of Al..... mine are. Not expensive at all.   
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James Harrison
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« Reply #365 on: July 06, 2020, 11:28:56 pm »

Aluminium gutters aren't a thing, to my knowledge, in the UK, at least in the mainstream domestic market. It's plastic or iron, and the iron really is the cast variety, with all the starting cost and ongoing maintenance that thwt entails.
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Deimos
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« Reply #366 on: July 07, 2020, 01:05:41 am »

...[T]he iron really is the cast variety, with all the starting cost and ongoing maintenance that thwt entails.

Good lord...I can only imagine the type(s) of hangers required to support them.  Shocked

Edit: OK.. So I googled cast iron gutter to see what they looked like.
They are pretty neat ...too bad they cost so much.
But I also googled aluminium gutter [UK] and got not a few hits.
Maybe something to check out  just to see another alternative to plastic?...
 
 
« Last Edit: July 07, 2020, 01:13:38 am by Deimos » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #367 on: July 07, 2020, 02:23:16 am »

Aluminium gutters aren't a thing, to my knowledge, in the UK, at least in the mainstream domestic market. It's plastic or iron, and the iron really is the cast variety, with all the starting cost and ongoing maintenance that thwt entails.

Reading in fascination the differences between US and UK construction standards. American gutters are practically disposable and usually hung from the edge of a timber roof. They are meant to be frequently changed and are really available in aluminium, PVC or copper if you're fancy, but it's all sheet metal. Iron gutters would be made for durability
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Deimos
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« Reply #368 on: July 07, 2020, 06:36:56 am »

.... American gutters are practically disposable and usually hung from the edge of a timber roof. They are meant to be frequently changed and are really available in aluminium, PVC or copper if you're fancy, but it's all sheet metal. Iron gutters would be made for durability

Can't say my gutters are "frequently changed".
They've been hanging up there for about 18 years now and still look good ...Aluminium, Desert Tan [what else?  Roll Eyes] by Alcoa.
Of course I keep tabs on any contractors on the roof (including the actual roofers).
 I politely ask them to lean their ladders where the gutter IS NOT.  
« Last Edit: July 07, 2020, 08:17:52 am by Deimos » Logged
James Harrison
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« Reply #369 on: July 07, 2020, 04:49:29 pm »

...[T]he iron really is the cast variety, with all the starting cost and ongoing maintenance that thwt entails.

Good lord...I can only imagine the type(s) of hangers required to support them.  Shocked

Edit: OK.. So I googled cast iron gutter to see what they looked like.
They are pretty neat ...too bad they cost so much.
But I also googled aluminium gutter [UK] and got not a few hits.
Maybe something to check out  just to see another alternative to plastic?...
 
 

Aluminium isn't exactly common here though, the options available off the shelf are either standard plastic (either square or half round or variations thereof) or iron.  My understanding that pretty much anything else has to be made to order.  If you take my street as being typical for the UK, probably 90% of it is guttered in plastic.  The majority of the rest is iron, in varying states of maintenance or repair, and aluminium is very much non-present.

So for me at least it's a case of Hobson's choice.

Anyhow; progress today....
-The plasterer has called and said he hopes to be able to do the hallway next week;
-More of the paintwork has been taken off the doorframes (exhausting work this, you can have a 5 or 10 minute blast at it then have to stop for another 15-20 minutes to recover);
-Three months after it arrived, my wardrobe has finally been built (so now tonight's activity is to put all my clothes in it). 

I'm close to having at least one doorway stripped back to timber and I anticipate the other will not be quite such an arduous task (having only one or two coats of paint rather than at least seven). 
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Madasasteamfish
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« Reply #370 on: July 07, 2020, 07:21:58 pm »



Anyhow; progress today....
-The plasterer has called and said he hopes to be able to do the hallway next week;
-More of the paintwork has been taken off the doorframes (exhausting work this, you can have a 5 or 10 minute blast at it then have to stop for another 15-20 minutes to recover);
-Three months after it arrived, my wardrobe has finally been built (so now tonight's activity is to put all my clothes in it). 

I'm close to having at least one doorway stripped back to timber and I anticipate the other will not be quite such an arduous task (having only one or two coats of paint rather than at least seven). 

Have you considered investing in a heat gun? It might well improve your chances/ability to remove paint (especially as it seems the previous of owners/occupants of your home didn't bother stripping the old paint before redecorating).
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James Harrison
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« Reply #371 on: July 07, 2020, 07:45:36 pm »

I've got one.  Unfortunately it likes to give people a shock when you unplug it, so it's waiting for plague to go away so it can be taken back to the store.  I also recall using it to strip the window sill, which it did in a very halfarsed can't-be-bothered fashion, and then gave me an electric shock. 
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Lord Pentecost
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« Reply #372 on: July 08, 2020, 08:01:47 am »

For your gutters it might be worth giving this kind of thing a look https://seamless-gutters.online/?gclid=Cj0KCQjwupD4BRD4ARIsABJMmZ_WTvkHIrSfk0rmXQzs5YCdNrSHcNglNX5ECC6yxXKyvBweqreK0_gaAgfnEALw_wcB

A google search for "Yorkshire gutters" leads to a few companies producing essentially the same product in extruded aluminium they also have a few more interesting profiles available than your standard half round or half hexagon 
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James Harrison
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« Reply #373 on: July 08, 2020, 09:44:17 am »

For your gutters it might be worth giving this kind of thing a look https://seamless-gutters.online/?gclid=Cj0KCQjwupD4BRD4ARIsABJMmZ_WTvkHIrSfk0rmXQzs5YCdNrSHcNglNX5ECC6yxXKyvBweqreK0_gaAgfnEALw_wcB

A google search for "Yorkshire gutters" leads to a few companies producing essentially the same product in extruded aluminium they also have a few more interesting profiles available than your standard half round or half hexagon 

That's as may be but as I see it the fundamental problems are thus:

1) My guttering is in places in a state of almost collapse (part has already fallen off) and needs replacing as soon as possible, not in several weeks allowing for lead time in having something bespoke designed and made up.  Which in any case I can't afford. 
2) The stuff that I have seen available off the shelf is twice the cost as the plastic option, even just for straight 6' runs of the half round type. Less expensive than iron I grant you (about 2/3 the cost) but still more than I can afford.   
3) Whichever material I choose, the profile has to match up with the neighbour's guttering, because on the front of the house my guttering runs onto the neighbours.  And whilst that still leaves me with the freedom to do as I please on the back, I'll leave eccentric multi-profile guttering to other lunatics thank you very much.   
4) What's it like to maintain and repair?  Iron would have been difficult, plastic is easily replaced, aluminium is.....?   

In any case the chap is now booked in for sometime next week so any further discussion will have to be purely academic. 
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James Harrison
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« Reply #374 on: July 08, 2020, 10:01:59 am »



I have seen done what you are planning, to stain/varnish some of the skirting.
Where that stained varnish meets the doorway casing (US: trimwork/millwork  around doors/windows is called casing) was, to my eyes  anyway, not a little bit jarring.
 My first thought was  "Why on earth did  he do that? It would have looked so much better to continue with the white baseboard." (US:  baseboard=skirting).

  

Works on the stripping have now progressed far enough that I can get an idea of how well my design in my head is translating into actual physical appearance. 



Doorway on the sitting room side.  This is done and won't be changed. 



The same doorway on the hallway side. 



And the joint between the two.  When shut, the door actually sits in a lip, so the edge of that lip is a logical place for the switch. 
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