The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
March 08, 2021, 11:30:20 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Brassgoggles.co.uk - The Lighter Side Of Steampunk, follow @brasstech for forum technical problems & updates.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 [11] 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 ... 35   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: That 'big project' I've been banging on about for a few years now....  (Read 33714 times)
Cora Courcelle
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #250 on: May 30, 2020, 11:11:53 am »



I'm starting t think that late Spring/ early Summer is perhaps not the best time of year to do serious yard work in a garden that has open aspects to east and west and faces south, you get direct sun from dawn until dusk. 


But to be fair, it wouldn't usually be such a big problem.  Normally you'd be just as likely to be trying to stop the holes being filled up with rain water ...
Logged

You have to tread a fine line between avant-garde surrealism and getting yourself sectioned...
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #251 on: May 30, 2020, 11:53:00 am »



I'm starting t think that late Spring/ early Summer is perhaps not the best time of year to do serious yard work in a garden that has open aspects to east and west and faces south, you get direct sun from dawn until dusk. 


But to be fair, it wouldn't usually be such a big problem.  Normally you'd be just as likely to be trying to stop the holes being filled up with rain water ...

 Cheesy  This is very true. 
Logged

Persons intending to travel by open carriage should select a seat with their backs to the engine, by which means they will avoid the ashes emitted therefrom, that in travelling generally, but particularly through the tunnels, prove a great annoyance; the carriage farthest from the engine will in consequence be found the most desirable.
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #252 on: May 31, 2020, 11:14:40 am »

I've finished wrecking the front garden.  I think this little ditty is probably appropriate for this post. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=faQV8xDXSvw

When removing the trees I had to dig out slightly below the garden path, and in so doing I found these fragments.



Buff, unglazed, half-inch thick tiles.  I traced the markings on the back and they're from a tile works in Bridgnorth, about 20 miles away.  I'm tempted, from where they were found, to think they are the remnants of the original path. 

Moving around the front of the house and around the bay window....





These larger lumps of burnt red tile were found.  There's a suggestion of that same circular marking, which makes me at least consider they might be more garden path tiles, but I'd also note they're the same colour as my roof tiles, so I can't discount that theory. 



In roughly the same location, I also found these fragments.  Note the hole punched through one piece.  That was done before the tile was fired.  The only reason I can think of for putting a hole through a tile is to be able to nail it to a roof batten.  So I think this is a bit of an old roof tile. 



Lots, and lots, of lumps of brick and/or terracotta were found around the garden wall.  I know it's a relatively new wall and I'd note one of my neighbours in the next terrace still has their 'original' wall.  Which appears to be brick with terracotta details and a semi-circular top. 



Much-corroded length of iron or steel rod or cable, appears to have a bit of a screw thread at one end.  Can't remember exactly where in the garden I found this, I think it was somewhere around the front of the house though. 


Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #253 on: May 31, 2020, 11:52:56 am »



Aerial view of the house in 1934; much enlarged from a wider photograph, hence the graininess.  A few interesting things to point out:

1) My garage predates 1934.
2) It appears my front garden was originally larger and at some point a corner of it was nibbled off, presumably for road improvement works. 
Logged
SeVeNeVeS
Master Tinkerer
***
England England



« Reply #254 on: May 31, 2020, 12:26:31 pm »

A possible clue where the tiles are concerned, are they the same thickness? A narrower red tile with a hole, as you suggest, could be a roof tile, but I think slate was generally used for roofs in most areas of the UK, not sure about where you live tho'.

The colours pretty much match the tiles I salvaged from my Mums garden.
Logged

Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia



« Reply #255 on: May 31, 2020, 12:27:29 pm »

Aerial view of the house in 1934; much enlarged from a wider photograph, hence the graininess.  A few interesting things to point out:
1) My garage predates 1934.
2) It appears my front garden was originally larger and at some point a corner of it was nibbled off, presumably for road improvement works. 

Which is your house, James?

All those tiles and bits and pieces dug up in your garden make the archaeologist in me drool!
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #256 on: May 31, 2020, 12:39:59 pm »

If you are looking at that photograph, my terrace is the one in the middle of it.  My house is on the left-hand end.  My house is practically in the centre of the photograph. 
Logged
SeVeNeVeS
Master Tinkerer
***
England England



« Reply #257 on: May 31, 2020, 12:43:04 pm »

I agree, like an episode of Time Team Grin

When I dug the pond, many, many years ago the only thing I found interesting out there was a concrete base and side walls for a WW2 Anderson Shelter, with corrugations for the steel roof. Extremely hard concrete, so hard, I had to change the plans for the whole pond.
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #258 on: May 31, 2020, 12:47:10 pm »

A possible clue where the tiles are concerned, are they the same thickness? A narrower red tile with a hole, as you suggest, could be a roof tile, but I think slate was generally used for roofs in most areas of the UK, not sure about where you live tho'.

The colours pretty much match the tiles I salvaged from my Mums garden.

The red and buff are roughly the same thickness, but there's a definite lip or joint between them if you place them next to each other.  That striated look on the red/black/burnt tile is exactly like the tiles on the roof to the bay window (and I note that some tiles there have broken apart and bits gone presumably skittering over the edge and into the garden).  Hmm, that might be a job to look at when lockdown is over and done with- getting a roofer out to give an opinion whether it could do with repair.

I agree, like an episode of Time Team Grin

When I dug the pond, many, many years ago the only thing I found interesting out there was a concrete base and side walls for a WW2 Anderson Shelter, with corrugations for the steel roof. Extremely hard concrete, so hard, I had to change the plans for the whole pond.
 

Please tell me the Anderson Shelter became the pond?
Logged
SeVeNeVeS
Master Tinkerer
***
England England



« Reply #259 on: May 31, 2020, 01:17:02 pm »



I agree, like an episode of Time Team Grin

When I dug the pond, many, many years ago the only thing I found interesting out there was a concrete base and side walls for a WW2 Anderson Shelter, with corrugations for the steel roof. Extremely hard concrete, so hard, I had to change the plans for the whole pond.
 

Please tell me the Anderson Shelter became the pond?
In part, half was used as a firm base for a bit of the pond, the other half I'm afraid is under my small conservatory.
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #260 on: May 31, 2020, 02:55:10 pm »

I'd have been tempted to waterproof the concrete, then flood it  Cheesy



One of the other little things I've done this weekend; some sketch elevations of the dining room with my three thoughts for decoration in there.  I think I've decided which one I'll be going for in due course. 
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #261 on: May 31, 2020, 06:57:48 pm »

Textbook example this evening of how I conduct my DIY. 

Since moving in I've been unable to shut the dining room door on account of the piece of floor trim covering the joint between hallway and dining room floors.  It sits too high, so as you push the door shut the bottom of it catches the trim.  The second you loose the door, it springs back open. 

This evening I noticed that it's not exactly securely fixed down, so I was able to lever it off.  Success!- the door can now be shut.  In so doing I found I'd exposed the edge of the hallway tiles.  "The original tiles are still in place, they're just underneath these new ones".... I remember the vendors telling me.  You can see where this is going, can't you?

Long story short. One of the tiles is now shorn of its grouting, tomorrow (if I get chance) I might get a chisel and see if I can remove one or two of them intact and crucially without wrecking anything still in place below, to inspect these original tiles. 
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #262 on: May 31, 2020, 07:41:19 pm »

From what I can tell;

1. There might be something below these tiles, there might not.  The bit I can see around where the floor trim was, all I can see is lumps of rough grout and cement- not a smooth colourful tile finish as you might expect. 
2. If I break the existing tiles trying to prise them up and there is nothing below, well I've kind of put myself in a situation, haven't I?
3. If I get the tiles up and there is a floor below, there's no guarantee I can expose it without damaging it.  Nor do I know what condition it is in, nor whether I'll be able to clean it up assuming it's covered in lumps of grout and cement. 
4. If there is a floor there in good condition, it will be sitting about 10mm lower than the rest of my floors.  Ergo, if there is a floor there which has been covered up, at the same time all of the ground floor in the house was similarly raised so you're not stepping up and down between rooms. 

So I think on balance the best way to go is to assume there's nothing there and just re-grout the existing tiles.  I was somewhat disappointed to find they're a fake- they are large modern tile, each of which has the Minton pattern printed four times on them.  So what looks like four smaller tiles is in fact one large one.  Maybe sometime I will replace the floor and fully investigate but now is not that time I feel. 
Logged
montysaurus
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #263 on: June 01, 2020, 01:41:13 am »

When fixing a house remember 4 things. In the following order. Try to do it right the first time. Do The things that will stop other major problems from happening first. There is a certain order to do some things. (example Repair the plumbing leak before you fix the ceiling below.) and lastly, it ats a marathon, so pace yourself.
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #264 on: June 01, 2020, 05:26:43 pm »

Yes, I'm planning this to be a fairly long-term project with the major bits getting done first.  The difficulty at the moment of course is this damn' plague, and stopping me getting people in to look at things that I can't.  Otherwise most of the carpentry (largely minor issues) and electrical work (largely minor issues) would be done by now. 

Meantime I'm just doing the little bits that will keep me occupied- the sitting room was an easy win as it just needed paint, and clearing out the front garden would have needed doing anyway, and the hallway is another bit where probably 95% of the work is of the order of painting and decorating. 

I've broken out the magnifying glass ( Cheesy ) this evening and the unsolved mystery of the hallway floor gets more intriguing.  The modern tiles are raised above the other floors by about 10mm, suggesting they really have been laid on top of an existing surface.  Underneath the tiles, on the edge I have exposed, in places you can see something a bright red.  The condition of whatever that bright red is though, remains unknown.  I was hoping to be able to buy some more tools at lunch time and have a good go at it tonight but curiously enough half the town had nothing better to do at 1PM on a Monday than stand around in the DIY store carpark.  Meanwhile I had to get back to work, so that was a wasted trip out (even if it was a nice walk in the sun). 
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #265 on: June 01, 2020, 07:52:01 pm »

Err.... something happened.  It was a nice something!- don't worry!- and I rather like where it might lead. 

"The original tiles are underneath these ones...."

Well of course having been told that, you'd be curious, wouldn't you?



"There's something there..."



"Just the vaguest hint of...."



"Just a fragment, or something larger?"



"Larger"



"Larger...."



"It's still going...."

It looks like it's about making for the front door.  A few of them seem to have been robbed out but you can buy modern reproductions and it appears there's enough to reinstate the original pattern.  What sort of a philistine would cover these up though?
Logged
Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
Board Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #266 on: June 01, 2020, 08:17:37 pm »

What sort of a philistine would cover these up though?

Never underestimate the power of "fashion". I remember seeing more than one home decor programme where the presenter took up the carpet/lino in the hallway of the house in question and was in raptures over the tiles beneath, ignoring the fact that back in the 70s etc. they weren't "fashionable" and so were covered up with more popular styles.

Another good example is how a few years ago, my sister and her partner were redecorating their kitchen and was moaning to my mother about how expensive Belfast sinks were, running to several hundred pounds (for internation forumites this is what I refer to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sink#/media/File:Belfast_sink.jpg) and was astounded to be told my grandfather still had the one that had been taken out of his kitchen in the 1970s (when it was replaced with a stainless steel version) down the garden where he used it as a water trough, along with a steel wash tub.
Logged

I made a note in my diary on the way over here. Simply says; "Bugger!"

"DON'T THINK OF IT AS DYING, JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH."
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #267 on: June 01, 2020, 08:25:10 pm »

My Grandparents had three Belfast sinks, ironically sunk up to the rim, in their back garden.  I think they were still there when the house was sold last year (and have doubtless since been skipped).  Which is a pity really because the long-term plan for the kitchen is to put in a Belfast sink. 
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #268 on: June 02, 2020, 02:01:11 pm »

Two heavy duty masonry chisels bought. Tonight the real fun begins...
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #269 on: June 02, 2020, 07:35:11 pm »



The current situation.  I estimate I've uncovered about a tenth of it so far. 
Logged
Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia



« Reply #270 on: June 02, 2020, 09:52:09 pm »

Progress!
Looking good, James, keep up the good work!
Logged
Deimos
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


aka Countess Millicent Addlewood


« Reply #271 on: June 02, 2020, 09:54:33 pm »

When it's time to actually lay new tile....

This place is in the States but maybe there is a similar place in England:
                          Restoration Tile
Logged

Here is a test to find out if your mission in life is complete:
If you're alive, it isn't. -- Lauren Bacall

"You can tell a man's vices by his friends, his virtues by his enemies."

"Only the paranoid survive."
Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia



« Reply #272 on: June 03, 2020, 08:03:00 am »



The current situation.  I estimate I've uncovered about a tenth of it so far.  

Just the job for a patient archaeologist!
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #273 on: June 03, 2020, 05:41:18 pm »

When it's time to actually lay new tile....

This place is in the States but maybe there is a similar place in England:
                          Restoration Tile

There are a couple of places I know about that I can get replacement tiles from, there are architectural salvage yards dotted around the country to investigate, a few companies actually make reproductions of them (or else have been churning them out nonstop for the last 120 years).  I've got a few places in mind I can get some from. 



The current situation.  I estimate I've uncovered about a tenth of it so far. 

Just the job for a patient archaeologist!

You ain't seen nothing yet; the anaglypta has yielded up a secret in a few places where I'm removed it...
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #274 on: June 03, 2020, 08:26:26 pm »



The current state of the hallway.

Last night I noticed some of the anaglypta around the doorways and arch was peeling, so I took a putty knife to it.  What I found underneath was a mucky brown-yellow paint that has a waxy sort of a feel to it; not in the 'urgh! greasy! yucky!' sense but just feels nice and smooth, your fingers glide across it.  In one or two places I've worked at it further and underneath it is just white plaster.  It's not plasterboard. 

I'm hesitant to announce I've found an original Edwardian interior, certainly not a complete one anyway- it looks like this is just on the one side of the hallway, proven in extent just around the arch at the moment (whether it carries on to the front door is yet to be determined). 

I'll just note the following however. 
1) It looks like it has been applied to bare white plaster, whilst the plaster could have been stripped and replaced of course you'd expect it to be done in plasterboard like one or two other areas I've investigated- and also, that archway is plaster too, and there isn't a joint between it and the painted stuff....
2) When I applied water to the paint it didn't sink in, it just sat on the surface and ran down the wall. Like you'd expect from an oil paint.  Edwardian paints tended to be either distemper (water-based) or linseed-oil based.  Linseed-oil paints do yellow over time, but unsurprisingly the most popular colours were the cheapest, ochre being a very popular one.  Which is about what I've got, actually. 

So the question is where to go from here.  The rest of the anaglypta is coming down of course, that's a given.  And in some areas the plaster needs repair, so with the best will in the world a little bit of this old paint will be lost.  I also have doubts that I'll be able to get an exact match, and what with it being water-repellant if I were to try to work it into the decoration I'd probably have to go down the oil paint route.  I'm not a huge fan of open vats of foul-smelling oil paints and turpentine and what not, the fumes disagree with my lungs. 

My thoughts right now are to clean up the walls, see exactly how much of this old wall finish remains, try to colour-match it in emulsion, and then cover the walls with lining paper before painting it.  To my mind that gets me an evidence-based reproduction interior without unduly damaging the historic fabric. 
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 [11] 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 ... 35   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.426 seconds with 16 queries.