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Poll
Question: How bold do I go with the front entrance?
Go with the retro flow - 2 (20%)
Get a little creative - 1 (10%)
Use a touch of imagination - 1 (10%)
Give full artistic licence - 6 (60%)
Total Voters: 8

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Author Topic: Hurricane Has Inhabited another Home with a History  (Read 7289 times)
Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia



« Reply #50 on: February 14, 2020, 04:48:13 am »

I would love an Art Deco home - my favourite design period, although I do have a soft spot for the Pre-Raphaelite genre.

Very little can be done with a 1968 weatherboard bungalow, although if I could afford it I would have it clad in (fake, but good fake) stone   with slate-impressed pressed steel Colourbond roofing - my own little stone cottage in the country!! The inside would have to be redecorated, and the carpet would most definitely have to go!!

Ditto, Banfili. Our Perth house had been a complete Art Deco and we enjoyed bringing it back from the atrocities of previous owners. We now live in a 1980s house... the era where architraves and cornices and skirting boards were small, mean and painted mission brown. There were pink tiles on the kitchen floor - the whole catastrophe. A 1968 weatherboard sounds wonderful!


The previous owner ripped out a perfectly good, almost brand new 1968 kitchen to put in a mission-ish brown laminex monstrosity! Used upholstery tacks to fasten down the edges of the two pieces of remnant Lino they covered the floor with, AND used the wallpaper from Mrs Brown's utility room in Finglas, Dublin, on every wall, top to bottom!! I managed to peel most of the top layer of the wallpaper off most of the walls, but wasn't climbing up on the cupboards to peel off the rest!

You win!  Grin

Didn't think it was a competition!! Grin Grin

However, there are compensations. The rooms are reasonably large, and the ceilings relatively high for a 'modern' house. The Kitchen and living room came equipped with ceiling fans, although the controllers were installed back to front. If you want them on in the summer, you have to put them on winter settings!! Living room has an air conditioner - essential in this climate.

The land it's built on is a double block - .13 of a hectare, and, prime requirement for me, it is relatively flat. It came with a dodgy lean-to down the back yard attached to an equally dodgy mesh-sided 'shed' for want of a better word, with a sloping concrete floor. The front is a later addition, & I think it was the original carport before they built a decent shed with attached carport, and another carport attached to the side of the house. It had a paved patio area, with steps up to the back door, now covered by a large deck, with ramp up the side.

Once I had the deck built and the ramp installed I realised that I could not use the carport for the car - the ramp took up the legislated space, which meant that if I parked the car right in, I couldn't open the door to get out! Stage 5 of the renovations was to extend the carport to the front of the house & shift the gates, and put a side window in the front bedroom, which I use as an office, & the car now has protection!!
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Mercury Wells
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I insiste that you do call me WELLS. :)


« Reply #51 on: February 14, 2020, 03:44:30 pm »




Is it made of Bakelite?
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Oh...my old war wound? I got that at The Battle of Dorking. Very nasty affair that was, I can tell you.

The Ministry of Tea respectfully advises you to drink one cup of tea day...for that +5 Moral Fibre stat.
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #52 on: February 15, 2020, 06:35:42 pm »


 Mr Wells, I believe it is original bakerlite from the 40s . There is a mix of fittings from various era  throughout the house . A couple of sockets are blended. The small kitchen has  at least  6 socket/ switch sets, most of them double.
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #53 on: February 15, 2020, 06:42:50 pm »

My dog is a stickybeak - also a curtain twitcher - has to know what is going on outside like some old nosey parker...



 
Nosey Parker -  haven't heard that in years . By Crikey. I'm glad I came in for a look see
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #54 on: February 17, 2020, 08:45:25 am »

I found an article on Architectural Digest about how to convert an interior to Art Déco. Unfortunately all the pictures shown were of interiors on white and black... I'm sure there were more colors in the Jazz Era...
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Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia



« Reply #55 on: February 17, 2020, 09:37:33 am »

I found an article on Architectural Digest about how to convert an interior to Art Déco. Unfortunately all the pictures shown were of interiors on white and black... I'm sure there were more colors in the Jazz Era...

Jade green and onyx were both popular.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #56 on: February 17, 2020, 09:23:21 pm »

I found an article on Architectural Digest about how to convert an interior to Art Déco. Unfortunately all the pictures shown were of interiors on white and black... I'm sure there were more colors in the Jazz Era...

Jade green and onyx were both popular.

My grandfather used to own a couple of apartment buildings in Mexico City, at Nápoles Borough, these were Art Déco buildings from the late 30s, and I remember a lot of granite with brass inserts between the tiles and details mixed in the rails of the staircase. Curved walls everywhere and glass blocks
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Deimos
Snr. Officer
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aka Countess Millicent Addlewood


« Reply #57 on: February 18, 2020, 02:43:08 am »

And now we have......this...
https://fineartamerica.com/featured/state-farm-at-tempe-town-lake-dave-dilli.html
*sigh*
The uglification continues....makes me want to vomit.
(Near AZ State Univ.--aka ASU-- about 8km from my house if anyone is curious of location)  

So Annie, do whatever you can to combat the lack of imagination in current architecture by going radically individual in your renovation. Quite.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2020, 05:27:39 am by Deimos » Logged

Here is a test to find out if your mission in life is complete:
If you're alive, it isn't. -- Lauren Bacall

"You can tell a man's vices by his friends, his virtues by his enemies."

"Only the paranoid survive."
Synistor 303
Snr. Officer
****
Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #58 on: February 18, 2020, 04:58:39 am »

And now we have......this...
https://fineartamerica.com/featured/state-farm-at-tempe-town-lake-dave-dilli.html
*sigh*
The uglification continues....makes me want to vomit.
(Near Az State Univ. about 8km from my house if anyone is curious of location) 

So Annie, do whatever you can to combat the lack of imagination in current architecture by going radically individual in your renovation. Quite.

Should have come with a warning, Deimos... I LOOKED at it, and now can't un-see it, my eyes are ruined! (back of hand to the brow in dramatic fashion).
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Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia



« Reply #59 on: February 18, 2020, 05:15:59 am »

And now we have......this...
https://fineartamerica.com/featured/state-farm-at-tempe-town-lake-dave-dilli.html
*sigh*
The uglification continues....makes me want to vomit.
(Near Az State Univ. about 8km from my house if anyone is curious of location) 

So Annie, do whatever you can to combat the lack of imagination in current architecture by going radically individual in your renovation. Quite.

Should have come with a warning, Deimos... I LOOKED at it, and now can't un-see it, my eyes are ruined! (back of hand to the brow in dramatic fashion).

Ye gods! That is horrible!
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #60 on: February 18, 2020, 06:38:12 am »

And now we have......this...
https://fineartamerica.com/featured/state-farm-at-tempe-town-lake-dave-dilli.html
*sigh*
The uglification continues....makes me want to vomit.
(Near AZ State Univ.--aka ASU-- about 8km from my house if anyone is curious of location)  

So Annie, do whatever you can to combat the lack of imagination in current architecture by going radically individual in your renovation. Quite.

 I took a meander down the river bank today . I was pleased to note that most character homes were intact and undergoing regentrification rather than demolition. Not that is a big river  or grand waterfront . A few streets of Victorian, Edwardian workers cottages and bungalow and 40s residences with the occasional 70s  homes.

 No doubt the shacks and old beach houses round on the coastal  frontage will be eventually torn down and replaced  by tasteless  2 story  tragedies
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #61 on: February 18, 2020, 06:44:35 am »

Unfortunately there is a trend towards really impersonal and ugly glass buildings as of late. Now, let me be clear: I'm not anathema towards contemporary construction. But there is a difference between creative construction and Borg Collective cubes. I have seen international architecture firms place ugly glass buildings in lieu of shopping centers in downtown Mexico City and Singapore. I have to say I'm impressed with the ability of architects to make cookie cutter glass towers. Often times, they don't even bother to polarize them to block the view of office cubicles and the like. At least the tower you show is all "chrome."

Let me show you. A video from less than a decade old buildings in downtown CDMX to give you an idea of what I'm talking about; this is Polanco neighborhood, founded in the late 1890s, and an area that became famous in the 1930s becauseof the  celebrities who lived there, basically the equivalent of RodeoDDrive, in Beverly Hills in the US. Because of the time-frame when the borough became a swanky location, a number of Art Déco and Neo Baroque buildings sprouted during the Jazz Era, and that is what the neighborhood is most famous for (plus the elegant ultra expensive shops)

What I'm showing you in the first video is an area that was built around Soumaya Museum, dedicated to the wife of Lebanese-Mexican billionaire Carlos Slim - that used to be his *personal *art collection  Roll Eyes In that area you'll find, if course, the headquarters of Nestlé in Mexico and one of the Apple Stores. It's the latest construction (2010s) in the area. Modern it is. But pretty is not. Downright ugly, I'd say and it sticks out like a sore thumb from the rest of the neighborhood (second video)

Area around Soumaya Museum, Polanco, Mexico City built in the 2010s - by international architect firms
4K WALK Arte y Urbanismo en MEXICO CITY CDMX travel 4k video


Older (1990s-2000s) shopping complexes in the same area - Iron Palace Department Store - like saying Macy's in the US.
The architects of the triangular building and shopping centre are Mexican
【4K】WALK POLANCO at night MEXICO CITY CDMX slow tv TRAVEL VLOG


Can you spot the difference? It's subtle but in spite of being contemporary in style, they look very different. You can spot the Mexican architects' buildings a mile away.

To put things into perspective, look at the older areas. The old part of Polanco looks a lot more like the video below of Condesa Borough, which is right next door (Roma, Condesa and Nápoles are right next to one another and they were late 19th foreigner enclaves originally. Some of the older 19th century architecture is still there mixed in with the 29th century Art Déco and Neo Baroque) .

4K WALK Mexico City La Condesa CDMX slow tv Mx TRAVEL VLOG

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Deimos
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


aka Countess Millicent Addlewood


« Reply #62 on: February 18, 2020, 09:07:25 am »

"I took a meander down the river bank today . I was pleased to note that most character homes were intact and undergoing regentrification rather than demolition. Not that is a big river  or grand waterfront . A few streets of Victorian, Edwardian workers cottages and bungalow and 40s residences with the occasional 70s  homes.
 No doubt the shacks and old beach houses round on the coastal  frontage will be eventually torn down and replaced  by tasteless  2 story  tragedies "


"Abominations" ...the word you are looking for is "abominations". :-p
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Mercury Wells
Rogue Ætherlord
*
I insiste that you do call me WELLS. :)


« Reply #63 on: February 18, 2020, 02:28:43 pm »

Some of the older 19th century architecture is still there mixed in with the 29th century Art Déco and Neo Baroque .

29th Century?  Shocked

So what is life like in the 2800s?  Smiley
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #64 on: February 18, 2020, 11:11:41 pm »

Some of the older 19th century architecture is still there mixed in with the 29th century Art Déco and Neo Baroque .

29th Century?  Shocked

So what is life like in the 2800s?  Smiley

Aaah! That timey wimey thing strikes again! Well, no matter, I meant 20th century. It's the fault of the auto-spell in my iPhone 345, quantum dark matter edition.
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #65 on: February 20, 2020, 09:44:57 am »

Some of the older 19th century architecture is still there mixed in with the 29th century Art Déco and Neo Baroque .

29th Century?  Shocked

So what is life like in the 2800s?  Smiley

Aaah! That timey wimey thing strikes again! Well, no matter, I meant 20th century. It's the fault of the auto-spell in my iPhone 345, quantum dark matter edition.

 Your jig is up  J Wilhelm !  Our sneaking suspicions are  confirmed. You are obviously an anthropologic nvestgaotor  from a nother time continuum many light years ahead . Here to research the human race by immersion in our cyberscape .

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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #66 on: August 29, 2020, 12:01:24 am »

Hurricane Annie has been busy. Rip, tear and bust. The draconian Lock Down and lack of access to paint, trades persons and plants has been the only barrier to going the full throttle on the revamp. The policeman's pants blue is about to be banished permanently. Bourgeois bushes, shrubs and trees have been subject to deforestation and defoliation.





{unidentified neighbour cat}








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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #67 on: August 29, 2020, 12:26:53 am »



Bountiful treasure has been unearthed in local 2nd hand and charity shops. Furniture, fittings and furnishings for future features.

lucky lounge setting find with an echo of another era from a 2nd hand dealer  reluctant to sell it. fitted in like it was there forever.


shining a retrospective light. I'm a closet lamp shade hoarder. I have a hall cupboard full of them kept with the vintage curtains.


Landscaping has reached a milestone, alongside a cluster of  "larger ratite eggs"{ an interesting shaped rocks found on the local beach}





 The previous occupants left a pile of PVC spouting under the deck.{on closer inspection it appears to be a former home made hydroponics set up[police interest in previous occupant is a tale for another day]} Its been put to  rehabilitated use as garden edging.








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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #68 on: August 29, 2020, 12:52:31 am »

Very nice abode...

So.....1) what is the roof material? (looks like metal)

        2) Exterior siding material? Don't know if you all call it "siding".

           In the US house exteriors can be brick, [concrete] block (like mine), stucco (which I hate... houses that are stuccoed  typically have clay tile roofs--the whole thing being a [faux]  "southwestern" look--I call them "yuck-o houses with vile roofs"...but I digress), or they can be clapboard exteriors, or [treated] wood or vinyl siding. I've even seen some pseudo log cabin exteriors.



Yes, the dreaded "Taco Bell" architecture. Clay tile roof is legitimately Spanish, (though many people don't realize it's actually ROMAN, because that was used all over the Mediterranean and Spain was a Roman province at one point) *ahem*

Anyhow, Stucco in the US has ZERO relationship with actual Spanish architecture or Spanish - Mexican missions in the northern Viceroyalty of the New Spain (Mexico) provinces. American stucco uses coarse sand to give texture to what basically is a cement spackling, whereas most plaster in the Spanish world is smooth.

I think Stucco is a derivative of the plaster used over Adobe* buildings in what is now the US State of New Mexico. The architecture was an adaptation of Native American mud and hay building techniques (Adobe) which was then used in the province of "Santa Fé de Nuevo Mexico" by the Spanish friars and military garrisons. Somehow, Americans decided that was "Spanish Architecture" and ever since the 1920s - 30s, the "Mission Style" has been used in certain parts of the United States.... Including but not limited to Taco Bell buildings  Tongue


*PS. "Adobe"
The word Adobe actually is ancient Egyptian and came into the Spanish language during the Caliphate period in Spain ; however mud construction in the Middle East and Native American Adobe techniques are different, the Spanish simply used the word to refer to any mud - based construction technique.

 stucco in NZ is often referred to as "Spanish Mission" style. They are also known as  concrete or fibro homes which is possibly more honest. It isn't a patch on the flavour of genuine Spanish missions or even the Californian faux mission style architecture .




  in response to your previous post, I too travel on the YouTube express. Sometimes I like to hitch a ride on a passing hybrid airship or electric train video.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #69 on: August 29, 2020, 02:35:35 am »

Very nice abode...

So.....1) what is the roof material? (looks like metal)

        2) Exterior siding material? Don't know if you all call it "siding".

           In the US house exteriors can be brick, [concrete] block (like mine), stucco (which I hate... houses that are stuccoed  typically have clay tile roofs--the whole thing being a [faux]  "southwestern" look--I call them "yuck-o houses with vile roofs"...but I digress), or they can be clapboard exteriors, or [treated] wood or vinyl siding. I've even seen some pseudo log cabin exteriors.



Yes, the dreaded "Taco Bell" architecture. Clay tile roof is legitimately Spanish, (though many people don't realize it's actually ROMAN, because that was used all over the Mediterranean and Spain was a Roman province at one point) *ahem*

Anyhow, Stucco in the US has ZERO relationship with actual Spanish architecture or Spanish - Mexican missions in the northern Viceroyalty of the New Spain (Mexico) provinces. American stucco uses coarse sand to give texture to what basically is a cement spackling, whereas most plaster in the Spanish world is smooth.

I think Stucco is a derivative of the plaster used over Adobe* buildings in what is now the US State of New Mexico. The architecture was an adaptation of Native American mud and hay building techniques (Adobe) which was then used in the province of "Santa Fé de Nuevo Mexico" by the Spanish friars and military garrisons. Somehow, Americans decided that was "Spanish Architecture" and ever since the 1920s - 30s, the "Mission Style" has been used in certain parts of the United States.... Including but not limited to Taco Bell buildings  Tongue


*PS. "Adobe"
The word Adobe actually is ancient Egyptian and came into the Spanish language during the Caliphate period in Spain ; however mud construction in the Middle East and Native American Adobe techniques are different, the Spanish simply used the word to refer to any mud - based construction technique.

 stucco in NZ is often referred to as "Spanish Mission" style. They are also known as  concrete or fibro homes which is possibly more honest. It isn't a patch on the flavour of genuine Spanish missions or even the Californian faux mission style architecture .




  in response to your previous post, I too travel on the YouTube express. Sometimes I like to hitch a ride on a passing hybrid airship or electric train video.


The tiny building looks similar to the 1940's Art Déco - ish bungalows that you see in the United States. I'm not sure if the fibre based Stucco we know today goes that far back in time, though. The "Taco Bell" architecture did make it all the way to Mexico City primarily in the Polanco Burough in the 1930s, probably within the Art Déco movement favored by movie stars. And noting Polanco is the direct equivalent of Beverly Hills, with Mexican personalities copying the Hollywood lifestyle. No doubt the architecture came in that way, but no Stucco. Instead you'd see plaster over masonry, or even paint over concrete and decorated with carved stone moldings all over the house.

The wiki entry on Stucco is not too useful. I was looking for historical references, to see how the composition evolved but it's mostly limited to North America from the late 19th century onward. Sometime in the late 20th century, the lime and sand composition was changed to Portland cement and sand over a wood scaffolding. Later wire mesh "lath" and synthetic fibre date back to post WWII. No references tying Stucco to plaster in Medieval Spain / North Africa or the American Southwest, but it's obvious that should be the origin of Stucco and the "Mission Style," even if just by inspiration. The closest possible relation is to Adobe buildings built in Caliphate Era Spain, or the adobe mission and government buildings in the New Spain, primarily the New Mexico province... The first time I ever saw Stucco was in Texas in the 1980s when we'd visit my uncle and family in Austin.

Stucco is basically American, inspired by New Mexican and Medieval Spanish roots. Kind of like Hard Shell Tacos are not really Mexican  Roll Eyes
« Last Edit: August 29, 2020, 03:18:46 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia



« Reply #70 on: August 29, 2020, 09:00:55 am »

Get stuck in, Hurricane! One can hazard a guess as to the previous use of all that poly pipe! Lots of green plants, I'd guess!!
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #71 on: August 30, 2020, 12:06:15 am »

Get stuck in, Hurricane! One can hazard a guess as to the previous use of all that poly pipe! Lots of green plants, I'd guess!!

 Electric Puha ; ) { puha: NZ ground weed traditionally used in Maori cooking}. NZ Green. Northland cash crop .
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #72 on: August 30, 2020, 12:51:30 am »

Very nice abode...

So.....1) what is the roof material? (looks like metal)

        2) Exterior siding material? Don't know if you all call it "siding".

           In the US house exteriors can be brick, [concrete] block (like mine), stucco (which I hate... houses that are stuccoed  typically have clay tile roofs--the whole thing being a [faux]  "southwestern" look--I call them "yuck-o houses with vile roofs"...but I digress), or they can be clapboard exteriors, or [treated] wood or vinyl siding. I've even seen some pseudo log cabin exteriors.



Yes, the dreaded "Taco Bell" architecture. Clay tile roof is legitimately Spanish, (though many people don't realize it's actually ROMAN, because that was used all over the Mediterranean and Spain was a Roman province at one point) *ahem*

Anyhow, Stucco in the US has ZERO relationship with actual Spanish architecture or Spanish - Mexican missions in the northern Viceroyalty of the New Spain (Mexico) provinces. American stucco uses coarse sand to give texture to what basically is a cement spackling, whereas most plaster in the Spanish world is smooth.

I think Stucco is a derivative of the plaster used over Adobe* buildings in what is now the US State of New Mexico. The architecture was an adaptation of Native American mud and hay building techniques (Adobe) which was then used in the province of "Santa Fé de Nuevo Mexico" by the Spanish friars and military garrisons. Somehow, Americans decided that was "Spanish Architecture" and ever since the 1920s - 30s, the "Mission Style" has been used in certain parts of the United States.... Including but not limited to Taco Bell buildings  Tongue


*PS. "Adobe"
The word Adobe actually is ancient Egyptian and came into the Spanish language during the Caliphate period in Spain ; however mud construction in the Middle East and Native American Adobe techniques are different, the Spanish simply used the word to refer to any mud - based construction technique.

 stucco in NZ is often referred to as "Spanish Mission" style. They are also known as  concrete or fibro homes which is possibly more honest. It isn't a patch on the flavour of genuine Spanish missions or even the Californian faux mission style architecture .




  in response to your previous post, I too travel on the YouTube express. Sometimes I like to hitch a ride on a passing hybrid airship or electric train video.


The tiny building looks similar to the 1940's Art Déco - ish bungalows that you see in the United States. I'm not sure if the fibre based Stucco we know today goes that far back in time, though. The "Taco Bell" architecture did make it all the way to Mexico City primarily in the Polanco Burough in the 1930s, probably within the Art Déco movement favored by movie stars. And noting Polanco is the direct equivalent of Beverly Hills, with Mexican personalities copying the Hollywood lifestyle. No doubt the architecture came in that way, but no Stucco. Instead you'd see plaster over masonry, or even paint over concrete and decorated with carved stone moldings all over the house.

The wiki entry on Stucco is not too useful. I was looking for historical references, to see how the composition evolved but it's mostly limited to North America from the late 19th century onward. Sometime in the late 20th century, the lime and sand composition was changed to Portland cement and sand over a wood scaffolding. Later wire mesh "lath" and synthetic fibre date back to post WWII. No references tying Stucco to plaster in Medieval Spain / North Africa or the American Southwest, but it's obvious that should be the origin of Stucco and the "Mission Style," even if just by inspiration. The closest possible relation is to Adobe buildings built in Caliphate Era Spain, or the adobe mission and government buildings in the New Spain, primarily the New Mexico province... The first time I ever saw Stucco was in Texas in the 1980s when we'd visit my uncle and family in Austin.

Stucco is basically American, inspired by New Mexican and Medieval Spanish roots. Kind of like Hard Shell Tacos are not really Mexican  Roll Eyes

 Art Deco buildings came to NZ in the 1920s and the style hung around through to the 60s. It is still popular . With a peak post WW2. The designs in NZ will have been heavily influenced by the magazines from American GIs stationed here in the war and Hollywood movies. Most of these homes will be fibro light construction, with the more luxury homes being concrete or brick. People went as far as putting plaster stucco over older weather board . The style is well diluted and subdued in NZ with little or no exterior decoration . They are a pale imitation of the California  and mecican. style . They  bear little resemblance  to their Spanish moor or Arabesque precessor .

 Modern homes  here are plaster over
chicken wire and  polystyrene on frames of untreated pine.  There are major issues with leaky rotting buildings   as a consequence.

One of our smaller cities with as devastated by an earthquake in the early 30s . Napier. It was rebuilt in the Art Deco style.  It has a strong tourism  industry  formed around the vintage architecture of the era

https://www.artdeconapier.com/

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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #73 on: August 30, 2020, 03:38:55 am »

SNIP
 Art Deco buildings came to NZ in the 1920s and the style hung around through to the 60s. It is still popular . With a peak post WW2. The designs in NZ will have been heavily influenced by the magazines from American GIs stationed here in the war and Hollywood movies. Most of these homes will be fibro light construction, with the more luxury homes being concrete or brick. People went as far as putting plaster stucco over older weather board . The style is well diluted and subdued in NZ with little or no exterior decoration . They are a pale imitation of the California  and mecican. style . They  bear little resemblance  to their Spanish moor or Arabesque precessor .

 Modern homes  here are plaster over
chicken wire and  polystyrene on frames of untreated pine.  There are major issues with leaky rotting buildings   as a consequence.

One of our smaller cities with as devastated by an earthquake in the early 30s . Napier. It was rebuilt in the Art Deco style.  It has a strong tourism  industry  formed around the vintage architecture of the era

https://www.artdeconapier.com/



The modern construction method you describe with timber and mesh under the plaster/stucco seems identical to one used in the US for Southwest architecture. If the weather is warm and dry enough, then there's no trouble, but for all those "modern" timber house building codes, durability is a major issue. That building method-most likely featuring concrete slab "foundationless" timber structures is very much a Post WWII method that Australia must have inherited from the US. It's an absolute mess. 

The building codes that ensued from that new paradigm, tied architect's hands and emasculated civil engineers, who will not use stone or masonry for structural elements, because "there are no manuals with engineering data" for masonry, and worse, no insurance company will cover a house unless the timber structure is the only structural support method used. I can't express the ridiculous level of complications you have to go through to just build a brick wall, which must not be structural and support itself apart from the house or building. Don't get me started with columns, mouldings and window frames made from stone.

Those track home abominations were designed to give housing to the masses, it was the primary choice for suburbia, filled with rows of identical houses.. But the problem is that the regulation and style carries over even to luxury mansions in the US. The problem was so acute that once a limestone quarry company begged me to design and patent (as if it was that easy) steel mounting mechanisms for all sorts of stone elements, from window frames, to wall slab (for tall commercial buildings) to columns, etc. Of they had the offered to finance the patents (which they didn't) and had I not been involved in my family business, I would have done precisely that to good effect. Sadly the 2008 global crisis killed my business, so sinking thousands of dollars into patenting hardware that no one would buy was impossible.
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Mercury Wells
Rogue Ætherlord
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I insiste that you do call me WELLS. :)


« Reply #74 on: August 30, 2020, 04:43:20 am »

Ms Annie, Naiper looks bloody great, what with the cars & buildings to boot!

Lets hope that developers/architects will never be allowed to get their filthy mitts on the area.
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