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Poll
Question: How bold do I go with the front entrance?
Go with the retro flow - 2 (22.2%)
Get a little creative - 1 (11.1%)
Use a touch of imagination - 1 (11.1%)
Give full artistic licence - 5 (55.6%)
Total Voters: 7

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Author Topic: Hurricane Has Inhabited another Home with a History  (Read 2362 times)
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
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Immortal
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United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


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« Reply #25 on: January 22, 2020, 08:15:26 am »

Very nice abode...

So.....1) what is the roof material? (looks like metal)

        2) Exterior siding material? Don't know if you all call it "siding".

           In the US house exteriors can be brick, [concrete] block (like mine), stucco (which I hate... houses that are stuccoed  typically have clay tile roofs--the whole thing being a [faux]  "southwestern" look--I call them "yuck-o houses with vile roofs"...but I digress), or they can be clapboard exteriors, or [treated] wood or vinyl siding. I've even seen some pseudo log cabin exteriors.



Yes, the dreaded "Taco Bell" architecture. Clay tile roof is legitimately Spanish, (though many people don't realize it's actually ROMAN, because that was used all over the Mediterranean and Spain was a Roman province at one point) *ahem*

Anyhow, Stucco in the US has ZERO relationship with actual Spanish architecture or Spanish - Mexican missions in the northern Viceroyalty of the New Spain (Mexico) provinces. American stucco uses coarse sand to give texture to what basically is a cement spackling, whereas most plaster in the Spanish world is smooth.

I think Stucco is a derivative of the plaster used over Adobe* buildings in what is now the US State of New Mexico. The architecture was an adaptation of Native American mud and hay building techniques (Adobe) which was then used in the province of "Santa Fé de Nuevo Mexico" by the Spanish friars and military garrisons. Somehow, Americans decided that was "Spanish Architecture" and ever since the 1920s - 30s, the "Mission Style" has been used in certain parts of the United States.... Including but not limited to Taco Bell buildings  Tongue


*PS. "Adobe"
The word Adobe actually is ancient Egyptian and came into the Spanish language during the Caliphate period in Spain ; however mud construction in the Middle East and Native American Adobe techniques are different, the Spanish simply used the word to refer to any mud - based construction technique.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2020, 12:02:23 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #26 on: January 22, 2020, 10:37:17 am »

Because as Prof. Marvel  has pointed out, there is no privacy afforded  by Google, I loaded my neighbour's address in the search bar to find and image of my home. My residence has several addresses attached to the title, which has totally confused all the property information websites. They have pictures of my place on all my neighbour's addresses- while not listing my property at all . Alas there is none from inside of the  ecclectic vintage interior decor  

I've done away with all the  blasted electric blue.Torn down the arch. Ripped off all signs of vicious dogs and paranoid people. The  grounds have been re landscaped some what .


This is  the premises where I am currently stationed.



The house looks wonderful, Annie! And while I agree with Prof. Marvel on the security issues, I have to be play the Devil's Advocate and say that were it not for Google, I would have never been able to see if my childhood home in Mexico City was still standing. Google Maps in the last few years appears to have become more taxing to computer systems, and what used to be handled quite swiftly within Mozilla, a mere 2GB RAM and an old Athlon 64 is now a chore to do (too slow, saturates the RAM), so obviously the online application has become quite "fatter" with information that as you say, is highly intrusive...

Now I navigate the streets of the world by way of the cornucopia of "Travel Porn" drone videos available on YouTube...

 Thank you Mr Wilhelm. I have long  admired the posted images of yiour childhood home.  There is the good , the bad and the ugly of information overload in the 'net. You tube  has  wonderful journeys , trains , planes, cars, airship. I find them soothing  to view.  One can glide along  gently for  a few minutes. Though I'm not sure I'm prepared for the results of searching " travel porn"...  not after the Granny Squares crochet incidents...
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #27 on: January 22, 2020, 10:38:42 am »

Your footpath is much neater (and greener!) than mine! Mine is an easement back from the highway this little hamlet enjoys running through the middle of it, about 30 metres wide (the easement, that is!), with the added beauty of an 18 car carpark hanging off one end (curtesy of the Shire council and the bowls club next door! But 'I' do have a stonking great London Plane tree that gives beautiful shade, and shelter, sitting right in the middle of the easement, in front of my house. My house is weatherboard, in need of a paint (but who can afford that!) with a corrugated tin roof.

Your 'section' is my 'block' (which is a double!). I have neighbours to my right, the bowls club to my left, to the left of that there is a creek, and out the back cow paddocks running 800 metres or so to the river! I can't be built-up in front of, to the left or to the rear, as the paddocks are also flood plains and not to be built upon, even though the Dartmouth Dam up river has stopped the flooding!
Birds chirping is about all I can hear out there this morning!

   After the morning rush is it quiet with  a bowling Green and empty car park  next door ? Or is it full of rowdy boozy bowling enthusiasts ? I have  a park nearby and bowling green on the other side , with squash courts , both aging  and from the affluent era of the town . A river  meanders   500 metres away  outbm to sea. There's paddocks with  cows and horses not too far away. My house needs a good sand and paint , which my lungs are too beggared to do .

We have a District Council for the greater city population 80K , which is really more of a shire or borough, I've lived in bigger suburbs.  My town or suburb on the out skirts  is approx 6K .

We haven't had a gang shooting since I've been here , or a police raid in the street . The neighbours have suggested it's due to my presence. It may have more to do with the previous occupants absence,  rather  than any  peaceful quietening influence  on my part. There is a heavy police presence on regular patrol. I still  get the wayward customers of the previous business tapping furtively on the door on occasion.  But then , all that just makes me feel at home as history repeats  . ..




Excitement plus at your house!
This is a very small hamlet between a small town and another, smaller town, so for the most part very, very quiet! The bowlers meet on Tuesday mornings and Sunday afternoons in spring and summer, and the only problem has been 'teaching' them that now they have a carpark of their own they should use it, instead of parking under my tree! There are fewer than 20 full members, only one of whom lives permanently in the valley now - most of them have relocated to retirement villages in Wodonga, which is the nearest city, 60-odd kms away, or live down the valley in the small town at the southern end of the valley! Competition or tournament days bring bowlers from other places, but usually they car pool, so the car park itself may have an odd empty space.

There isn't a rush hour, really, just the folks driving down from further up the valley in their daily commute and back again & the school bus. The odd truck - cattle or goods, the occasional tractor, or resident driving in to pick up mail and food from the IGA, or stuff for the dairy and cattle farms around the place. No mail delivery in town - it's a 200 metre walk here and back to get my mail, milk & Friday newspaper (it has the telly programmes in it on Fridays now!).

It's busier on weekends, public and school holidays, as its a big recreational area round here, with boating, fishing, hunting, bushwalking and just wandering around having a stickybeak!

Quieter this summer because of the fires, of course. There is another fire about 6-7 kms away down the valley today, caused by a lightning strike - 6 vehicles attending, and a strong, hot, nor-easter just to make life interesting!!

The new policeman in the valley (we don't have one of our own) is in next town up, as is the ambulance for the whole valley!

 Just enough activity to twitch the lace curtains
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Deimos
Officer
***
United States United States


aka Countess Millicent Addlewood


« Reply #28 on: January 22, 2020, 07:53:19 pm »

...
It's busier on weekends, public and school holidays, as its a big recreational area round here, with boating, fishing, hunting, bushwalking and just wandering around having a stickybeak!...

Am going to make what you all may think a much less interesting (and slightly off topic) observation, but it fascinates me; it is this:

I have learned so many new words that are not used in the US.  Example: "stickybeak".
Had to look it up.  Once I knew what it meant it is obvious the word itself describes the activity (kind of like a visual "onomatopoeia").
Learned a lot of new words during the discussion of the bush fires (unfortunate circumstances in that case).
I love words... discovered the Thesaurus (jeez, sounds like I'm a paleontologist!) when I was about 12 and just started reading it like a book.
I couldn't believe there were so many different ways to say something.
And now I'm learning a [mostly] Oz, NZ and British "dialect" :-D  
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Here is a test to find out if your mission in life is complete:
If you're alive, it isn't. -- Lauren Bacall

"Only the paranoid survive."
Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia



« Reply #29 on: January 23, 2020, 12:48:36 am »

...
It's busier on weekends, public and school holidays, as its a big recreational area round here, with boating, fishing, hunting, bushwalking and just wandering around having a stickybeak!...

Am going to make what you all may think a much less interesting (and slightly off topic) observation, but it fascinates me; it is this:

I have learned so many new words that are not used in the US.  Example: "stickybeak".
Had to look it up.  Once I knew what it meant it is obvious the word itself describes the activity (kind of like a visual "onomatopoeia").
Learned a lot of new words during the discussion of the bush fires (unfortunate circumstances in that case).
I love words... discovered the Thesaurus (jeez, sounds like I'm a paleontologist!) when I was about 12 and just started reading it like a book.
I couldn't believe there were so many different ways to say something.
And now I'm learning a [mostly] Oz, NZ and British "dialect" :-D  

Not at all less interesting, Deimos! I think I was born reading, and a Thesaurus and Dictionary have been my constant companions ever since! I belong to a couple of lists with "word of the day" and other interesting facts about words and language, and they also feed the passion!

Australian English, (and its sub-language "Strine"), is very much different from NZ, English, American, and any other national take on the language, and it is a challenge to keep up some times.

The 'national' accents are a bit different, too. Australians and New Zealanders can tell each other apart quite easily, but other nationalities can struggle - the first time I went to Ireland a couple of people thought I was a Kiwi. I dare say most Americans can tell a Canadian first off, but I have to really listen hard to get it right! And the number of regional dialects and expressions in Britain is mind boggling! I can identify a Liverpool accent with some certainty, and Welsh, of course, but with some regional accents - west Scotland, for example, I struggle to pick the difference between a Scot and Ulster Scots-Irish accent.

However you look at it, word-power rules!

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Synistor 303
Snr. Officer
****
Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #30 on: January 23, 2020, 03:21:13 am »

My dog is a stickybeak - also a curtain twitcher - has to know what is going on outside like some old nosey parker...

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Prof Marvel
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


learn from history, or be doomed to repeat it


« Reply #31 on: January 23, 2020, 03:49:59 am »


..... Google Maps in the last few years appears to have become more taxing to computer systems, and what used to be handled quite swiftly within Mozilla, a mere 2GB RAM and an old Athlon 64 is now a chore to do (too slow, saturates the RAM), so obviously the online application has become quite "fatter" with information that as you say, is highly intrusive...

My Dear J

I am using my thrift-store special, an old toshiba satellite with 4 g ram (granted, twice what you have)
running win 7 LOL... I also the free program "Ublock" on firefox - searching Austin on
google maps, specifically looking at Barton Creek Habitat Preserve, is pretty quick.
I think it is because Ublock is blocking 67 different connection requests...

perhaps that might help?

yhs
prof marvel
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Professor Marvel's Traveling Apothecary and Fortune Telling Emporium

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Purveyor of Patent Remedies, Snake Oil, Cleaning Supplies, Dry Goods, and Picture Postcards
Offering Unwanted Advice for All Occasions and Providing Useless Items to the Gentry
Since 1822
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #32 on: January 23, 2020, 04:15:59 am »


..... Google Maps in the last few years appears to have become more taxing to computer systems, and what used to be handled quite swiftly within Mozilla, a mere 2GB RAM and an old Athlon 64 is now a chore to do (too slow, saturates the RAM), so obviously the online application has become quite "fatter" with information that as you say, is highly intrusive...

My Dear J

I am using my thrift-store special, an old toshiba satellite with 4 g ram (granted, twice what you have)
running win 7 LOL... I also the free program "Ublock" on firefox - searching Austin on
google maps, specifically looking at Barton Creek Habitat Preserve, is pretty quick.
I think it is because Ublock is blocking 67 different connection requests...

perhaps that might help?

yhs
prof marvel

Getting Ubllock stat. I could double my RAM But because of the age of the motherboard (AM2+) I'm having a real hard time getting the DDR2 1066 chips without paying an arm and a leg for probably faulty RAM at Newegg.
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Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia



« Reply #33 on: January 23, 2020, 06:25:59 am »

My dog is a stickybeak - also a curtain twitcher - has to know what is going on outside like some old nosey parker...

Both my cats do that!
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #34 on: February 08, 2020, 01:58:06 am »


Here are the promised photos of my new abode in all it's faded glory. You are all cordially invited in. Welcome through the front door, front entrance, to the front room and down the shining corridor






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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #35 on: February 08, 2020, 02:01:18 am »


Fellow Antipodeans will recognise the mystery cupboard by the back door. Back when the mikman and butcher boy delivered to housewives at home




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Synistor 303
Snr. Officer
****
Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #36 on: February 08, 2020, 02:15:30 am »

Ooo, I do love that carpet... We got something similar in an Art Deco house we once owned in Perth, only it was in shades of pink and grey... We left it in situ while we renovated then hauled it out to the kerb and put a 'FREE' sign on it and within a day it was gone. (No accounting for taste). The carpet, though, was the only thing of colour in the entire house when we bought it - the rest of the interior was beige. EVERYTHING was beige - beige flooring, beige walls, beige curtains, beige ceilings, beige doors and frames, beige window frames - even the toilet suite was *&%! BEIGE. By accident, I found a grey and white and mustard coloured marble which lined the entry walls, (cut in a continuous piece around the door) UNDER the beige paint! It took me 3 months of work to scrape it all off, and no-one could believe it when it was done; "Who on earth would paint over that - it looks amazing!" was said many, many times. I still shake my head over that one.
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #37 on: February 08, 2020, 02:23:37 am »

these special features were all included in the purchase price. Gaudy early era 70s wall paper and formica . Small peice of magical carpet discovered in wardrobe. "pub" carpet. "Tuscany" roman blinds. A whirl of wood grain laminate.

 There is a Darlek on the ceiling of my Tardis! Shocked






« Last Edit: February 08, 2020, 02:34:34 am by Hurricane Annie » Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #38 on: February 08, 2020, 02:32:37 am »

Ooo, I do love that carpet... We got something similar in an Art Deco house we once owned in Perth, only it was in shades of pink and grey... We left it in situ while we renovated then hauled it out to the kerb and put a 'FREE' sign on it and within a day it was gone. (No accounting for taste). The carpet, though, was the only thing of colour in the entire house when we bought it - the rest of the interior was beige. EVERYTHING was beige - beige flooring, beige walls, beige curtains, beige ceilings, beige doors and frames, beige window frames - even the toilet suite was *&%! BEIGE. By accident, I found a grey and white and mustard coloured marble which lined the entry walls, (cut in a continuous piece around the door) UNDER the beige paint! It took me 3 months of work to scrape it all off, and no-one could believe it when it was done; "Who on earth would paint over that - it looks amazing!" was said many, many times. I still shake my head over that one.

 you uncovered a sinister criminal offence while renovating. That Beige Brigade ought to hanged for capitol offending.  I lived in Perth in the mid 80s as a teen, in the older seedier districts. There were amazing older houses that had been left relatively untampered with. The suburbs were a colourful mix of colonial and Mediterranean. Mt Hawthorne, Leederville, Scarborough were my haunting grounds and Innaloo
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #39 on: February 08, 2020, 03:12:42 am »


I have been denuding the place of its policeman's pants blue and attending to the landscaping. I'm going for a tropical oriental look, inspired by the remnants of the original inhabitant's oasis and the grand boulevard of broken dreams near by.  A long stretch of road built pre WW2, in the town's long gone hey day; it was intended as the main commercial precinct with a wide centre strip of  rubber trees, Nicholai strelizia, towering phoenix palms. Somehow it never rose from the ashes








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Synistor 303
Snr. Officer
****
Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #40 on: February 08, 2020, 04:23:22 am »

Whoa! That's a lot of work you've done already. I have to admit, we didn't touch the garden for a year so we didn't miss any gems that might come up/flower. The front left side of our place remains in 'partially renovated' state, because in 2013 they are going to put the sewer connection on...
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #41 on: February 08, 2020, 05:18:54 am »

Whoa! That's a lot of work you've done already. I have to admit, we didn't touch the garden for a year so we didn't miss any gems that might come up/flower. The front left side of our place remains in 'partially renovated' state, because in 2013 they are going to put the sewer connection on...

 I always get a little worried incase I stumble across something they connected themselves ...  I've already had snap dragons and Johnny jump ups  come up on the lawn , rhubarb rhizomes in the old vege plotb and what I hope are cabbage tree seedlings in the garden stones. Euphorbia is running rampant  and some  60s rock garden creeper is crawling all over the garden , lawn and concrete
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J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
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Immortal
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United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #42 on: February 08, 2020, 12:35:59 pm »

Whoa! That's a lot of work you've done already. I have to admit, we didn't touch the garden for a year so we didn't miss any gems that might come up/flower. The front left side of our place remains in 'partially renovated' state, because in 2013 they are going to put the sewer connection on...

2013?  That's what I love about retrofuturism, we're all over the space-time continuum.  Grin
 
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Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #43 on: February 09, 2020, 12:40:08 pm »

Indeed, lots of potential - and that Tardis-like entance is a lovely feature. I feel that if you did't fancy installing a dematerialisation circuit in there it would look great in an Art Deco style.

Yours,
Miranda.
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #44 on: February 11, 2020, 07:58:16 am »

Indeed, lots of potential - and that Tardis-like entance is a lovely feature. I feel that if you did't fancy installing a dematerialisation circuit in there it would look great in an Art Deco style.

Yours,
Miranda.

 Thank you for your encouragement Miss Miranda . it appears to be the original 40s entrance. The door and porch steps lend themselves to heritage colours . The original handle or knocker has been replaced with a bakerlite  interior door handle.  It will be an interesting treasure hunt finding a suitable knob for the TARDIS  dash  I'm glad the whole entrance wasn't replaced in the 70s  make over
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James Harrison
Immortal
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England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #45 on: February 12, 2020, 10:26:28 pm »

How much of it could you put back to it's 1940s appearance?  Because you could really go to town with the whole late 1940s chrome dieselpunk look....
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Persons intending to travel by open carriage should select a seat with their backs to the engine, by which means they will avoid the ashes emitted therefrom, that in travelling generally, but particularly through the tunnels, prove a great annoyance; the carriage farthest from the engine will in consequence be found the most desirable.
Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia



« Reply #46 on: February 13, 2020, 04:41:16 am »

I would love an Art Deco home - my favourite design period, although I do have a soft spot for the Pre-Raphaelite genre.

Very little can be done with a 1968 weatherboard bungalow, although if I could afford it I would have it clad in (fake, but good fake) stone   with slate-impressed pressed steel Colourbond roofing - my own little stone cottage in the country!! The inside would have to be redecorated, and the carpet would most definitely have to go!!
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Synistor 303
Snr. Officer
****
Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #47 on: February 13, 2020, 05:38:02 am »

I would love an Art Deco home - my favourite design period, although I do have a soft spot for the Pre-Raphaelite genre.

Very little can be done with a 1968 weatherboard bungalow, although if I could afford it I would have it clad in (fake, but good fake) stone   with slate-impressed pressed steel Colourbond roofing - my own little stone cottage in the country!! The inside would have to be redecorated, and the carpet would most definitely have to go!!

Ditto, Banfili. Our Perth house had been a complete Art Deco and we enjoyed bringing it back from the atrocities of previous owners. We now live in a 1980s house... the era where architraves and cornices and skirting boards were small, mean and painted mission brown. There were pink tiles on the kitchen floor - the whole catastrophe. A 1968 weatherboard sounds wonderful!
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Banfili
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Australia Australia



« Reply #48 on: February 13, 2020, 12:01:27 pm »

I would love an Art Deco home - my favourite design period, although I do have a soft spot for the Pre-Raphaelite genre.

Very little can be done with a 1968 weatherboard bungalow, although if I could afford it I would have it clad in (fake, but good fake) stone   with slate-impressed pressed steel Colourbond roofing - my own little stone cottage in the country!! The inside would have to be redecorated, and the carpet would most definitely have to go!!

Ditto, Banfili. Our Perth house had been a complete Art Deco and we enjoyed bringing it back from the atrocities of previous owners. We now live in a 1980s house... the era where architraves and cornices and skirting boards were small, mean and painted mission brown. There were pink tiles on the kitchen floor - the whole catastrophe. A 1968 weatherboard sounds wonderful!

The previous owner ripped out a perfectly good, almost brand new 1968 kitchen to put in a mission-ish brown laminex monstrosity! Used upholstery tacks to fasten down the edges of the two pieces of remnant Lino they covered the floor with, AND used the wallpaper from Mrs Brown's utility room in Finglas, Dublin, on every wall, top to bottom!! I managed to peel most of the top layer of the wallpaper off most of the walls, but wasn't climbing up on the cupboards to peel off the rest!
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Synistor 303
Snr. Officer
****
Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #49 on: February 14, 2020, 12:33:43 am »

I would love an Art Deco home - my favourite design period, although I do have a soft spot for the Pre-Raphaelite genre.

Very little can be done with a 1968 weatherboard bungalow, although if I could afford it I would have it clad in (fake, but good fake) stone   with slate-impressed pressed steel Colourbond roofing - my own little stone cottage in the country!! The inside would have to be redecorated, and the carpet would most definitely have to go!!

Ditto, Banfili. Our Perth house had been a complete Art Deco and we enjoyed bringing it back from the atrocities of previous owners. We now live in a 1980s house... the era where architraves and cornices and skirting boards were small, mean and painted mission brown. There were pink tiles on the kitchen floor - the whole catastrophe. A 1968 weatherboard sounds wonderful!


The previous owner ripped out a perfectly good, almost brand new 1968 kitchen to put in a mission-ish brown laminex monstrosity! Used upholstery tacks to fasten down the edges of the two pieces of remnant Lino they covered the floor with, AND used the wallpaper from Mrs Brown's utility room in Finglas, Dublin, on every wall, top to bottom!! I managed to peel most of the top layer of the wallpaper off most of the walls, but wasn't climbing up on the cupboards to peel off the rest!

You win!  Grin
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