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Author Topic: Everyday style advice?  (Read 849 times)
Prof Marvel
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


learn from history, or be doomed to repeat it


« Reply #25 on: January 19, 2020, 10:58:57 pm »

I always think of androgynous not as men wearing women's clothes or women wearing men's but as a mixture of both male and female attire in the same outfit.

Dear Cora , men and women can both be from Mars. The late David Bowie taught us that.  Having the best of both worlds. Androgynyy is about leaving people guessing  in a rebellious way; not sure if your a boy or a girl


Be Rebellious
Keep Them Guessing

We have a winner!

PS somewhere there was a post  expressing distress when asked " should we call you X or Y" , I believe "he" or "she"

and I meant to comment -

'The question should not be
      " Should we call you He or She"

The polite question ought to be 
     "with respect, and for convenient and polite communication,
      what pronoun do you prefer when one referrs to you in the third person?"

yhs
prof mumbles
« Last Edit: January 19, 2020, 11:07:13 pm by Prof Marvel » Logged

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~~~~~Professor Algernon Horatio Ubiquitous Marvel The First~~~~~~
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Acclaimed By The Crowned Heads of Europe
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Since 1822
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #26 on: January 20, 2020, 08:13:14 am »

I always think of androgynous not as men wearing women's clothes or women wearing men's but as a mixture of both male and female attire in the same outfit.


Dear Cora , men and women can both be from Mars. The late David Bowie taught us that.  Having the best of both worlds. Androgynyy is about leaving people guessing  in a rebellious way; not sure if your a boy or a girl


Be Rebellious
Keep Them Guessing
We have a winner!

PS somewhere there was a post  expressing distress when asked " should we call you X or Y" , I believe "he" or "she," and I meant to comment -
'The question should not be " Should we call you He or She." The polite question ought to be "with respect, and for convenient and polite communication, what pronoun do you prefer when one refers to you in the third person?"

yhs
prof mumbles


That's a tough call however. It's never as simple as that. I've struggled with the pronouns people should call me - and I'm not bragging - but I have been confused for a woman a fairly good number of times already since I started presenting as androgyne 5-6 years ago (I can't believe it's been that long). If we stick to Androgyne clothing as being relevant only to "Gender Expression" then we are not talking about Gender Identity or Sexual Orientation issues- just how we feel we need to dress in front of the world. In that sense, the idea is that your gender expression somehow ties in to how you feel about yourself inside without specifying who you are explicitly to the world. It's not like I go around telling everybody that I'm "Gender Fluid." Very few people over the age of 25 even know what that means anyway. So I'd feel like I'm imposing if I insist on the "They" pronoun.

Now as a guide, I posted this at the "Queer Geer" to help differentiate between Gender Expression, Gender Orientation, and Sexual Orientation (just to keep things straight (pun intended Grin ) :  http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,48140.msg1001539.html#msg1001539

I've been called "Ma'am" mostly by older men over 50, and "Sir" by mostly younger men over 25 - oddly enough sometimes complimenting me on my "Beatles" haircut; I guess my lack of effeminate mannerisms coupled with their sharper perception makes younger people latch to my true gender, regardless of my appearance, but women are more careful to avoid the wrong pronoun than men.

The teenagers, don't even bat an eye from my looks. I guess they are very "woke" and they know already that people come in different genders and presentations- it's like I'm not even there. Young adults under 25, both sexes seem to be the most accepting - with women under 25 *always* smiling and on occasion one will compliment me - all the while avoiding any pronouns. Young women have an easy time approaching me and conversing, and on occasion I will get compliments from them too - but always being careful to avoid offending pronouns.

The older women over 40 are the most interesting bunch. They pay the most attention to me whether they see me as feminine or masculine, and absolutely give me the lion share of the compliments I will receive on my looks - Those who engage me in longer conversations (eg in situations like repeat customers at my job) will begin using the "he" pronoun but only after I've indirectly answered the question of what my gender is. So my gender and/or sexuality is carefully being evaluated based on my personality and the way I talk or engage them - otherwise it seems that its a 50-50 proposition - not whether I'm a man (I think that's too obvious if you take a close look at me and have good vision Cheesy ) but whether they identify me as masculine or feminine, straight or gay, trans or not.

95 % of the time the over-40 female group will compliment me. Many will compliment my hair, even suggesting ribbons (Green for St. Patrick's Day  Cheesy), asking my hair color (Revlon #54  Cheesy). or asking who does my hair (their jaws drop when I tell them I cut my own hair  Shocked ). Oddly enough many (probably half) will see the more masculine side in me and even flirt with me (longer acquaintances, co-workers, etc. I've been complimented on my youthful looks -  so again, it can go either way - perception is everything - but I find this group of people to be the most curious, accepting and engaging of all.

Being "woke," open and curious is NOT just the domain of millennials it seems, so keep that in mind. It's just that they lack the proper nomenclature to classify who they're looking at. Older adults are open to experimentation too! That being said, younger men around 25 y.o. or so will also sometimes compliment me on my hair as well (say 5 times in a year - twice I've asked me who does my hair). Across all age groups, I'd say 75% positive reactions overall, 20% neutral and 5% negative.

What this tells me is that I'm fairly androgynous externally, but not internally, and people react to that. People tolerate my look well, but what kind of reaction I get (and which pronoun they use) largely depends on their age and me opening my mouth to say something.

So based on this experience, I've decided to accept all pronouns. I will not fault anybody for calling me "she." If someone asks me if "I'm gay" I will answer. I must own it if I'm presenting as female outwardly. I love it when people say "I'm pretty," (Mostly coming from females, but I've had two men say that) or when woman recommended a ribbon Cheesy (I must give that a try). And I've had my fair share of women - many more than I ever did before my androgynous presentation actually- complimenting me on being "good looking" (male). I love it too!  Some people will see me as female. Some as male. Some will wait for me to say something and compliment me anyway! Some will flirt with me after saying something!!  

If that is not "keeping them guessing" I don't know what is! I know I don't "pass" as a girl. But I don't want to. To be honest, I'm enjoying the whole process. There will be a few scowls. The look is polarizing - like a "bigot detector"  Grin And you're bound to have a homeless person ask whether you're a boy or a girl or make fun of you (exactly 3 times in 6 years).

You be the judge, I'm accepting all pronouns. Just don't call me "it."  Grin

« Last Edit: January 20, 2020, 08:21:06 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #27 on: January 20, 2020, 09:39:44 am »

I always think of androgynous not as men wearing women's clothes or women wearing men's but as a mixture of both male and female attire in the same outfit.

Dear Cora , men and women can both be from Mars. The late David Bowie taught us that.  Having the best of both worlds. Androgynyy is about leaving people guessing  in a rebellious way; not sure if your a boy or a girl


Rebel Rebel

David Bowie


Doo doo doo-doo doo doo doo doo
Doo doo doo-doo doo doo doo doo
Doo doo doo-doo doo doo doo doo

Hunter Schafer


You've got your mother in a whirl
She's not sure if you're a boy or a girl
Hey babe, your hair's alright
Hey babe, let's go out tonight
You like me, and I like it all

Erika Linder


We like dancing and we look divine
You love bands when they're playing hard
You want more and you want it fast
They put you down, they say I'm wrong
You tacky thing, you put them on

Andreja Pejic


Rebel rebel, you've torn your dress
Rebel rebel, your face is a mess
Rebel rebel, how could they know?
Hot tramp, I love you so!

Don't ya?
Doo doo doo-doo doo doo doo doo

Milla Jovovich


You've got your mother in a whirl 'cause she's
Not sure if you're a boy or a girl
Hey babe, your hair's alright
Hey babe, let's stay out tonight
You like me,…
Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #28 on: January 20, 2020, 11:18:49 am »

I always think of androgynous not as men wearing women's clothes or women wearing men's but as a mixture of both male and female attire in the same outfit.


Dear Cora , men and women can both be from Mars. The late David Bowie taught us that.  Having the best of both worlds. Androgynyy is about leaving people guessing  in a rebellious way; not sure if your a boy or a girl


Be Rebellious
Keep Them Guessing
We have a winner!

PS somewhere there was a post  expressing distress when asked " should we call you X or Y" , I believe "he" or "she," and I meant to comment -
'The question should not be " Should we call you He or She." The polite question ought to be "with respect, and for convenient and polite communication, what pronoun do you prefer when one refers to you in the third person?"

yhs
prof mumbles


That's a tough call however. It's never as simple as that. I've struggled with the pronouns people should call me - and I'm not bragging - but I have been confused for a woman a fairly good number of times already since I started presenting as androgyne 5-6 years ago (I can't believe it's been that long). If we stick to Androgyne clothing as being relevant only to "Gender Expression" then we are not talking about Gender Identity or Sexual Orientation issues- just how we feel we need to dress in front of the world. In that sense, the idea is that your gender expression somehow ties in to how you feel about yourself inside without specifying who you are explicitly to the world. It's not like I go around telling everybody that I'm "Gender Fluid." Very few people over the age of 25 even know what that means anyway. So I'd feel like I'm imposing if I insist on the "They" pronoun.

Now as a guide, I posted this at the "Queer Geer" to help differentiate between Gender Expression, Gender Orientation, and Sexual Orientation (just to keep things straight (pun intended Grin ) :  http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,48140.msg1001539.html#msg1001539

I've been called "Ma'am" mostly by older men over 50, and "Sir" by mostly younger men over 25 - oddly enough sometimes complimenting me on my "Beatles" haircut; I guess my lack of effeminate mannerisms coupled with their sharper perception makes younger people latch to my true gender, regardless of my appearance, but women are more careful to avoid the wrong pronoun than men.

The teenagers, don't even bat an eye from my looks. I guess they are very "woke" and they know already that people come in different genders and presentations- it's like I'm not even there. Young adults under 25, both sexes seem to be the most accepting - with women under 25 *always* smiling and on occasion one will compliment me - all the while avoiding any pronouns. Young women have an easy time approaching me and conversing, and on occasion I will get compliments from them too - but always being careful to avoid offending pronouns.

The older women over 40 are the most interesting bunch. They pay the most attention to me whether they see me as feminine or masculine, and absolutely give me the lion share of the compliments I will receive on my looks - Those who engage me in longer conversations (eg in situations like repeat customers at my job) will begin using the "he" pronoun but only after I've indirectly answered the question of what my gender is. So my gender and/or sexuality is carefully being evaluated based on my personality and the way I talk or engage them - otherwise it seems that its a 50-50 proposition - not whether I'm a man (I think that's too obvious if you take a close look at me and have good vision Cheesy ) but whether they identify me as masculine or feminine, straight or gay, trans or not.

95 % of the time the over-40 female group will compliment me. Many will compliment my hair, even suggesting ribbons (Green for St. Patrick's Day  Cheesy), asking my hair color (Revlon #54  Cheesy). or asking who does my hair (their jaws drop when I tell them I cut my own hair  Shocked ). Oddly enough many (probably half) will see the more masculine side in me and even flirt with me (longer acquaintances, co-workers, etc. I've been complimented on my youthful looks -  so again, it can go either way - perception is everything - but I find this group of people to be the most curious, accepting and engaging of all.

Being "woke," open and curious is NOT just the domain of millennials it seems, so keep that in mind. It's just that they lack the proper nomenclature to classify who they're looking at. Older adults are open to experimentation too! That being said, younger men around 25 y.o. or so will also sometimes compliment me on my hair as well (say 5 times in a year - twice I've asked me who does my hair). Across all age groups, I'd say 75% positive reactions overall, 20% neutral and 5% negative.

What this tells me is that I'm fairly androgynous externally, but not internally, and people react to that. People tolerate my look well, but what kind of reaction I get (and which pronoun they use) largely depends on their age and me opening my mouth to say something.

So based on this experience, I've decided to accept all pronouns. I will not fault anybody for calling me "she." If someone asks me if "I'm gay" I will answer. I must own it if I'm presenting as female outwardly. I love it when people say "I'm pretty," (Mostly coming from females, but I've had two men say that) or when woman recommended a ribbon Cheesy (I must give that a try). And I've had my fair share of women - many more than I ever did before my androgynous presentation actually- complimenting me on being "good looking" (male). I love it too!  Some people will see me as female. Some as male. Some will wait for me to say something and compliment me anyway! Some will flirt with me after saying something!!  

If that is not "keeping them guessing" I don't know what is! I know I don't "pass" as a girl. But I don't want to. To be honest, I'm enjoying the whole process. There will be a few scowls. The look is polarizing - like a "bigot detector"  Grin And you're bound to have a homeless person ask whether you're a boy or a girl or make fun of you (exactly 3 times in 6 years).

You be the judge, I'm accepting all pronouns. Just don't call me "it."  Grin




 My siblings and I , while being outwardly of overt gender  definition, have always been of ambiguous dress  and behaviours.  My children  follow the same pattern.

My brother , a large hairy burly man with a deep voice and mustache , would stretch my mother and sisters jumpers  to the point of tearing. He said his  leather shoulder bag  was more convenient for his motorbike , though he often wore it for walking and driving.

 My sister a dainty wee thing is just as comfortable in a long skirt and  hand knit jumper as sweat pants and a check flanellete men's shirt . She can dig , haul , drive utility vehicle as good as the next man . Once a punk fan she now likes to assume a very conservative religious look in modest attire, to avoid suspicion.

 I'm a curvy lass , I'll wear a vintage dress  or provocative  top . Or I may  dress down in a man's t shirt in camouflage  print or vintage logo and jeans .The prints are better and they come in a bigger size through the chest. It's also easier to be inconspicuous. Walking is my main transport and I'm long term single for various reasons . I've had intensive cancer treatment and other episodes of alopecia with cropped hair. People make assumptions. Especially when you're doing DIY or hauling stuff on a regular basis. Having 4 children doesn't stop people, including family,  from deciding youre obviously a lesbian. You would be surprised how many married women  will  openly flirt with a girl or make advances.  If I dress up  people tend to react very differently.  For some reason people assume I'm a social worker, other authority figure or a Bible thumper on a mission . Either way they step off the foot path to shun me .

 My youngest daughter a very pretty girl with beautiful long hair and  a unisex name, preferred boys clothes and had a favoured  Batman T-shirt with cape.  She prefered boys games and had a talent for DIY. [ I'd trust my girls to help with the DIY more than the boys]. The one day  she wanted to wear a dress to pre school, the mothers  were very concerned if let my son go  in a frilly dress.  The other children were quite upset by her choice of attire . They had all been convinced she was a boy  through social cues alone.  There was universal shock such a pretty little rough playing  ADHD boy , was an ADHD  ASD  girl.

 My next son up was a slight boy with soft features  till his later teens . People would ask if he was a boy or a girl  As he grew he let his hair grow long into red waves  and avoided shaving . When we were out together , he would get more attention from truck drivers than me.  Even when they realised he was not a tall slim red haired girl in men's shirts  and was  a young man ,  they would still keep looking . Now he looks like a 6 ft  + red head Jesus  and people  of both genders stop to stare  and comment on the flowing hair and beard .

My older girl doesn't look like me ,  6  inches taller and blonde. I had her young. I didn't look like her mother. We were familiarly affectionate together in public  when she was a teen, people would assume we were partners. It took her a while to realise. She didn't find it amusing as I did.

 I've learned to be entertained by others reactions . t's always flattering  to be flirted with from which ever gender .
Logged
Cora Courcelle
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #29 on: January 20, 2020, 03:30:19 pm »

We all strive to find our own style, or at least we should do, and if that means some confusion over whether to say he or she at least, hopefully, there's some communication going on.
Having just come back from shopping in my local town an alien observer could be pardoned for thinking that the near-universal earth uniform consists of jeans, padded anorak and woolly hat! The only sign of individuality in most people was how many bobbles said hat had on it. (Yes, l did have the anorak but with a dress and furry hat).
Logged

You have to tread a fine line between avant-garde surrealism and getting yourself sectioned...
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #30 on: January 20, 2020, 07:10:56 pm »

We all strive to find our own style, or at least we should do, and if that means some confusion over whether to say he or she at least, hopefully, there's some communication going on.
Having just come back from shopping in my local town an alien observer could be pardoned for thinking that the near-universal earth uniform consists of jeans, padded anorak and woolly hat! The only sign of individuality in most people was how many bobbles said hat had on it. (Yes, l did have the anorak but with a dress and furry hat).

I know exactly what you mean - at the weekend we had a Steampunk trip to Birmingham art gallery, but it ended up as a walkabout in the city centre; let's just say we rather stood out from the crowd  Wink.

As to androgynous vintage style, has anyone suggested yet 1900s cycling outfits? There are some nice images here - https://www.pinterest.co.uk/acelmt/early-bicycle-suits-for-women/.

Yours,
Miranda.
Logged
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #31 on: January 20, 2020, 11:06:31 pm »

We all strive to find our own style, or at least we should do, and if that means some confusion over whether to say he or she at least, hopefully, there's some communication going on.
Having just come back from shopping in my local town an alien observer could be pardoned for thinking that the near-universal earth uniform consists of jeans, padded anorak and woolly hat! The only sign of individuality in most people was how many bobbles said hat had on it. (Yes, l did have the anorak but with a dress and furry hat).

I know exactly what you mean - at the weekend we had a Steampunk trip to Birmingham art gallery, but it ended up as a walkabout in the city centre; let's just say we rather stood out from the crowd  Wink.

As to androgynous vintage style, has anyone suggested yet 1900s cycling outfits? There are some nice images here - https://www.pinterest.co.uk/acelmt/early-bicycle-suits-for-women/.

Yours,
Miranda.

You're right. I had forgotten all about it. There was at least one thread on "Victorian female trousers and two categories come to mind, riding skirts (split) and what you just mentioned with the bicycle club attire.
Logged
Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia



« Reply #32 on: January 21, 2020, 04:57:15 am »

After twelve years of obligatory uniforms at school, I was pleased never to have to face anything like that again - until in my later working life a uniform was optional, and I was able to decline.

My primary fields of study were archaeology/history and that allowed me to 'live the dream' clothing-wise, so to speak. While I was still in the workforce I was obliged to be neat, tidy and clean - no place for grubby librarians, especially on the loans desk! I also rode motorcycles for over 20 years, which led to the very fast demise of skirts and/or dresses as non-compliant clothing.

So, neatly pressed dress trousers and blouses, or garish psychedelic but pressed trousers and dress t-shirts for work - my lovely boss was very flexible - she, as manager maintained the dress code! However, I retired on disability a little over eleven years ago, and apart from the odd funeral or wedding, I retired my iron and ironing board!

When washed and folded properly clothes don't really need to be ironed, so long cargo pants in winter (classical archaeology clothing in Australia!), or shorts in summer, t-shirts, with or without long sleeved flannelette or cotton shirt is de rigeur for everyday wear, with a select wardrobe of suitably casual smart clothing.

I do, if questioned, identify as female heterosexual (not that it is anybody else's business, and they are rude to ask!) but don't feel obliged to dress gender specific, preferring to be comfortable and relaxed, and being a somewhat rectangular cube in shape - mens shirts are a better fit, as are mens t-shirts. With longish arms & legs for my relatively short height, to get sleeves the right length in ladies clothes I need to buy up to 3 sizes larger than I wear, depending on the maker!

Footwear depends on the circumstances and the season - winter going-out footwear being either my 'specially made orthopaedic boots, or dress walking shoes, summer footwear is slippers, crocs or sandals around the house, and dress sandals for best - oh, and ugg boots for winter casual wear!

Having ASD (on the high-functioning Aspergers end of the spectrum), I like to be comfortable, and not feel confined, so I go for a natural look - natural fibres like cotton or linen, loose, casual fit in my everyday wear, and t-shirts and loose trousers or shorts are the way to go for me! Loose, wide leg or culotte-style trousers are my choice for formal occasions, with a stylish blouse and jacket - I scrub up ok, without winning any great prizes!! Grin

And as I carry my basic archaeology kit in the car, I am always ready to hit the dirt!

« Last Edit: January 21, 2020, 05:06:09 am by Banfili » Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #33 on: January 21, 2020, 05:44:23 am »

We all strive to find our own style, or at least we should do, and if that means some confusion over whether to say he or she at least, hopefully, there's some communication going on.
Having just come back from shopping in my local town an alien observer could be pardoned for thinking that the near-universal earth uniform consists of jeans, padded anorak and woolly hat! The only sign of individuality in most people was how many bobbles said hat had on it. (Yes, l did have the anorak but with a dress and furry hat).

I know exactly what you mean - at the weekend we had a Steampunk trip to Birmingham art gallery, but it ended up as a walkabout in the city centre; let's just say we rather stood out from the crowd  Wink.

As to androgynous vintage style, has anyone suggested yet 1900s cycling outfits? There are some nice images here - https://www.pinterest.co.uk/acelmt/early-bicycle-suits-for-women/.

Yours,
Miranda.

 Women in breeches. That just will not do
Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #34 on: January 21, 2020, 10:18:38 am »

After twelve years of obligatory uniforms at school, I was pleased never to have to face anything like that again - until in my later working life a uniform was optional, and I was able to decline.

My primary fields of study were archaeology/history and that allowed me to 'live the dream' clothing-wise, so to speak. While I was still in the workforce I was obliged to be neat, tidy and clean - no place for grubby librarians, especially on the loans desk! I also rode motorcycles for over 20 years, which led to the very fast demise of skirts and/or dresses as non-compliant clothing.

So, neatly pressed dress trousers and blouses, or garish psychedelic but pressed trousers and dress t-shirts for work - my lovely boss was very flexible - she, as manager maintained the dress code! However, I retired on disability a little over eleven years ago, and apart from the odd funeral or wedding, I retired my iron and ironing board!

When washed and folded properly clothes don't really need to be ironed, so long cargo pants in winter (classical archaeology clothing in Australia!), or shorts in summer, t-shirts, with or without long sleeved flannelette or cotton shirt is de rigeur for everyday wear, with a select wardrobe of suitably casual smart clothing.

I do, if questioned, identify as female heterosexual (not that it is anybody else's business, and they are rude to ask!) but don't feel obliged to dress gender specific, preferring to be comfortable and relaxed, and being a somewhat rectangular cube in shape - mens shirts are a better fit, as are mens t-shirts. With longish arms & legs for my relatively short height, to get sleeves the right length in ladies clothes I need to buy up to 3 sizes larger than I wear, depending on the maker!

Footwear depends on the circumstances and the season - winter going-out footwear being either my 'specially made orthopaedic boots, or dress walking shoes, summer footwear is slippers, crocs or sandals around the house, and dress sandals for best - oh, and ugg boots for winter casual wear!

Having ASD (on the high-functioning Aspergers end of the spectrum), I like to be comfortable, and not feel confined, so I go for a natural look - natural fibres like cotton or linen, loose, casual fit in my everyday wear, and t-shirts and loose trousers or shorts are the way to go for me! Loose, wide leg or culotte-style trousers are my choice for formal occasions, with a stylish blouse and jacket - I scrub up ok, without winning any great prizes!! Grin

And as I carry my basic archaeology kit in the car, I am always ready to hit the dirt!



 Riding a motorbike in a skirt is not easy or ladylike.  There's a lot to be said for comfort . One does adapt ones everyday clothing style  to the restrictions of necessity. Librarians  are expected to dress a little eccentrically these days. It's not a staid job as it was. 





Logged
Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia



« Reply #35 on: January 21, 2020, 12:34:24 pm »

Riding a motorbike in a skirt is not easy or ladylike.  There's a lot to be said for comfort . One does adapt ones everyday clothing style  to the restrictions of necessity. Librarians  are expected to dress a little eccentrically these days. It's not a staid job as it was. 

My ziggy-zaggy trousers in black, multi-neon pink, yellow and green went very well with a plain black T! The only comments I heard were all positive! Then there were the neon fish on black, and the neon dinosaurs on black - the poor mid-blue dolphins on light blue paled by comparison!
Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #36 on: January 21, 2020, 09:43:03 pm »

Riding a motorbike in a skirt is not easy or ladylike.  There's a lot to be said for comfort . One does adapt ones everyday clothing style  to the restrictions of necessity. Librarians  are expected to dress a little eccentrically these days. It's not a staid job as it was. 

My ziggy-zaggy trousers in black, multi-neon pink, yellow and green went very well with a plain black T! The only comments I heard were all positive! Then there were the neon fish on black, and the neon dinosaurs on black - the poor mid-blue dolphins on light blue paled by comparison!

 Life is too short for pale blue and pale tan
Logged
Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia



« Reply #37 on: January 22, 2020, 01:05:42 am »

Riding a motorbike in a skirt is not easy or ladylike.  There's a lot to be said for comfort . One does adapt ones everyday clothing style  to the restrictions of necessity. Librarians  are expected to dress a little eccentrically these days. It's not a staid job as it was. 

My ziggy-zaggy trousers in black, multi-neon pink, yellow and green went very well with a plain black T! The only comments I heard were all positive! Then there were the neon fish on black, and the neon dinosaurs on black - the poor mid-blue dolphins on light blue paled by comparison!

 Life is too short for pale blue and pale tan

Absolutely! Colour is for using, not abusing!
Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #38 on: January 22, 2020, 04:01:48 am »

Riding a motorbike in a skirt is not easy or ladylike.  There's a lot to be said for comfort . One does adapt ones everyday clothing style  to the restrictions of necessity. Librarians  are expected to dress a little eccentrically these days. It's not a staid job as it was. 

My ziggy-zaggy trousers in black, multi-neon pink, yellow and green went very well with a plain black T! The only comments I heard were all positive! Then there were the neon fish on black, and the neon dinosaurs on black - the poor mid-blue dolphins on light blue paled by comparison!

 Life is too short for pale blue and pale tan

Absolutely! Colour is for using, not abusing!


 And that scheme is criminal offending
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