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Author Topic: Ex librii (libris-es?)  (Read 2935 times)
Caledonian
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« on: January 09, 2020, 10:02:36 pm »

I made my partner and myself some ex libris stamps with our respective coats of arms.

For my partner:

And for me:

These were made using lino cutting tools on something sold as a stamp base.
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morozow
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« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2020, 10:40:34 pm »

I've been planning to make an ex-libris for years.

And You did! You're cool!
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« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2020, 11:01:32 pm »

That's one of the cool things I was doing in art class when I was in high-school (10th - 12th grades). All that came to an end when I moved and started engineering on college.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linocut
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Banfili
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« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2020, 02:35:02 am »

On my list of things to to do! My family already has a coat of arms, but I have designed a variation in style for myself, using the same basic design but taken back in time to when my ancestors started earning their name!

Well done, Caledonian!
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Synistor 303
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« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2020, 03:29:23 am »

Looks great - and you even managed to cut out the words so they are not backwards (seen a LOT of word stuff-ups on lino-cuts)! Well done.
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Caledonian
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« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2020, 03:54:13 am »

On my list of things to to do! My family already has a coat of arms, but I have designed a variation in style for myself, using the same basic design but taken back in time to when my ancestors started earning their name!

Well done, Caledonian!
Be wary if family coats of arms. In most traditions these are not a thing. A coat of arms is granted to a person and will be inherited by their oldest son. All the other sons (and maybe daughters) would have their own arms. Making a variation is a good idea!

Looks great - and you even managed to cut out the words so they are not backwards (seen a LOT of word stuff-ups on lino-cuts)! Well done.
It's a little trick that has to do with how I transfer my sketches. Can't go wrong! I sketch on paper with a soft pencil, put the stamp on the drawing and then turned over the whole thing. Rubbed the back until the pencil was transferred, this already flips my sketch  Grin

That's one of the cool things I was doing in art class when I was in high-school (10th - 12th grades). All that came to an end when I moved and started engineering on college.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linocut

I did a lino cut once before in secundary, and picked it back up this week Grin never too late to get back to something

I've been planning to make an ex-libris for years.

And You did! You're cool!
Thank you!
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Banfili
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« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2020, 04:10:10 am »

On my list of things to to do! My family already has a coat of arms, but I have designed a variation in style for myself, using the same basic design but taken back in time to when my ancestors started earning their name!

Well done, Caledonian!
Be wary if family coats of arms. In most traditions these are not a thing. A coat of arms is granted to a person and will be inherited by their oldest son. All the other sons (and maybe daughters) would have their own arms. Making a variation is a good idea!

Irish coats of arms were "issued" by the English, but their cadency and use of arms are a bit different from the English.
I used the base image of a mounted, armoured knight, sword in hand, and converted it to a mounted Irish warrior, spear in hand. The basic colours remained the same - the horse is still natural white, but the image contains spots, which will be either silver or gold - I haven't decided yet! The warrior is unarmoured, carries a spear, and has a sword belted at the waist.

As the knight is in natural colour, so is my warrior. I know from my name that my seminal ancestor had brownish (dun-coloured) hair, so that is included. He was known as "the wolf of the north", and was a renowned warrior and horseman. I am including a wolf's head, and cadency mark as befits my place in the family line, and, unlike English Heraldry where women have a diamond shaped lozenge, I will have a shield of the type used in 9th & 10th century Ireland.

The images are not on my Mac as yet, but on the external hard drive I copied from my old Windows laptop.


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Caledonian
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« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2020, 04:25:27 am »

On my list of things to to do! My family already has a coat of arms, but I have designed a variation in style for myself, using the same basic design but taken back in time to when my ancestors started earning their name!

Well done, Caledonian!
Be wary if family coats of arms. In most traditions these are not a thing. A coat of arms is granted to a person and will be inherited by their oldest son. All the other sons (and maybe daughters) would have their own arms. Making a variation is a good idea!

Irish coats of arms were "issued" by the English, but their cadency and use of arms are a bit different from the English.
I used the base image of a mounted, armoured knight, sword in hand, and converted it to a mounted Irish warrior, spear in hand. The basic colours remained the same - the horse is still natural white, but the image contains spots, which will be either silver or gold - I haven't decided yet! The warrior is unarmoured, carries a spear, and has a sword belted at the waist.

As the knight is in natural colour, so is my warrior. I know from my name that my seminal ancestor had brownish (dun-coloured) hair, so that is included. He was known as "the wolf of the north", and was a renowned warrior and horseman. I am including a wolf's head, and cadency mark as befits my place in the family line, and, unlike English Heraldry where women have a diamond shaped lozenge, I will have a shield of the type used in 9th & 10th century Ireland.

The images are not on my Mac as yet, but on the external hard drive I copied from my old Windows laptop.


Hmm, I'm not familiar with Irish heraldry... Really just Scottish and Dutch. And some others from when I was part of a heraldic discussion group.
Do keep in mind silver and white look the same in heraldry
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Deimos
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« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2020, 05:17:41 am »

When making your labels do keep in mind that the plural of book (liber) in Latin this instance is "libris"
Hence the commercially produced labels that say "Ex Libris" are correct.
It means, quite literally, "from the books of [name]"  

    "liber" (Latin) singular...plural is "libri" ....both words are in the nominative case, i.e., when liber is used as the subject of a  
     sentence.
    "libri" (genitive aka possessive) whence comes the English word "library"
    
     "ex"  is a preposition ("from, out of") which is used in what is called the ablative case
      Hence "liber" must take the ablative form...singular is "libro", plural is "libris"

      Soooooo...  "Ex Libris" ... "from the books of ...."   Q.E.D ....aka TA-DA!   Wink

        

  
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Caledonian
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« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2020, 05:51:58 am »

When making your labels do keep in mind that the plural of book (liber) in Latin this instance is "libris"
Hence the commercially produced labels that say "Ex Libris" are correct.
It means, quite literally, "from the books of [name]"  

    "liber" (Latin) singular...plural is "libri" ....both words are in the nominative case, i.e., when liber is used as the subject of a  
     sentence.
    "libri" (genitive aka possessive) whence comes the English word "library"
    
     "ex"  is a preposition ("from, out of") which is used in what is called the ablative case
      Hence "liber" must take the ablative form...singular is "libro", plural is "libris"

      Soooooo...  "Ex Libris" ... "from the books of ...."   Q.E.D ....aka TA-DA!   Wink

      

I had always been told it means "from the library of..." but nevertheless, if you refer to the stamp as an "ex libris" and then have two of them, how would one say that
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Deimos
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« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2020, 06:18:24 am »

There is (as always) the literal translation of a foreign word/phrase, and the 'free' translation.

Most folks that have a library only have one....they might have a ton (or two) of books in them (mea culpa) but they still only have one library.
The labels came about on that assumption; i.e.; one [personal] library.

But [Abl plural] ex libris really does mean  "from the the books of...."

OK..."library" and "libraries"....Latin word for "library" is "bibliotheca" (nom., sing., fem.)
I'm pretty certain this word is late Latin or even ecclesiastical Latin, because its root word is "biblia" which is a Greek word (where the word 'Bible'  comes from). By way of comparison "ex libris"  is classical Latin, the Latin of Cicero, Virgil, J. Caesar etc.  

Nom plural is "bibliothecae" ....ablative plural (what you are interested in) is "bibliothecis"

Ummmm.....just my opinion but  I like the sound of  Ex Libris a lot better than Ex Bibliothecis....shorter too...fits on the label better  Grin

But  ....signum tuum, regulae tuae  Wink  

EDIT:
Sorry... it just occurred to me....I don't know what you were referring to when you said you have "two".
I assumed you meant two libraries (yours and your partner's)....so can you clarify what you meant by "two of them"?  
(I may have to change my answer substantially.... Grin)
« Last Edit: January 10, 2020, 06:44:09 am by Deimos » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2020, 06:39:32 am »

On my list of things to to do! My family already has a coat of arms, but I have designed a variation in style for myself, using the same basic design but taken back in time to when my ancestors started earning their name!

Well done, Caledonian!
Be wary if family coats of arms. In most traditions these are not a thing. A coat of arms is granted to a person and will be inherited by their oldest son. All the other sons (and maybe daughters) would have their own arms. Making a variation is a good idea!
SNIP

Depends on the national origin. Heraldry rules in Spain and France are different, and further modified as a function of history. As Banfili mentioned,, these are Irish conventions so it will depend on how the rules evolved from British conventions into Ireland - but in my case it's Spanish rules (and dating to 1127 AD) and coat of arms, even that old are indeed passed down the family untouched. On top of that, titles issued in Spain in the modern era are now extremely informal, and you're basically entitled to very little other than a nice plaque on your wall, and thus Arms don't have the same significance (as a "patent" of your rights and privileges).
« Last Edit: January 10, 2020, 06:50:37 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #12 on: January 10, 2020, 06:43:42 am »

SNIP

Looks great - and you even managed to cut out the words so they are not backwards (seen a LOT of word stuff-ups on lino-cuts)! Well done.
It's a little trick that has to do with how I transfer my sketches. Can't go wrong! I sketch on paper with a soft pencil, put the stamp on the drawing and then turned over the whole thing. Rubbed the back until the pencil was transferred, this already flips my sketch  Grin

SNIP

That's exactly how we did it, but I think we had a special type of linoleum that took the pencil marks very well. It was very easy to carve with the right set of gouges.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #13 on: January 10, 2020, 07:00:46 am »

There is (as always) the literal translation of a foreign word/phrase, and the 'free' translation.

Most folks that have a library only have one....they might have a ton (or two) of books in them (mea culpa) but they still only have one library.
The labels came about on that assumption; i.e.; one [personal] library.

But [Abl plural] ex libris really does mean  "from the the books of...."

OK..."library" and "libraries"....Latin word for "library" is "bibliotheca" (nom., sing., fem.)
I'm pretty certain this word is late Latin or even ecclesiastical Latin, because its root word is "biblia" which is a Greek word (where the word 'Bible'  comes from). By way of comparison "ex libris"  is classical Latin, the Latin of Cicero, Virgil, J. Caesar etc.  

Nom plural is "bibliothecae" ....ablative plural (what you are interested in) is "bibliothecis"

Ummmm.....just my opinion but  I like the sound of  Ex Libris a lot better than Ex Bibliothecis....shorter too...fits on the label better  Grin

But  ....signum tuum, regulae tuae  Wink  

EDIT:
Sorry... it just occurred to me....I don't know what you were referring to when you said you have "two".
I assumed you meant two libraries (yours and your partner's)....so can you clarify what you meant by "two of them"?  
(I may have to change my answer substantially.... Grin)

Libro and Biblioteca (without the "h") are literally the words in Spanish for book and library...

Oddly "Librería" in Spanish doesn't mean library, but "bookstore "

I was under the impression that Bibliotheca is Greek, passing into Romance tongue. "Biblios" is the Greek word for"book" as far as I know.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2020, 07:21:16 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Deimos
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« Reply #14 on: January 10, 2020, 07:17:45 am »

...Could à name be formed to mean "from two libraries"?

Worse and worse! Are you ready?

"Ex Bibliothecis Duabus"  (Or Ex Duabus Bibliothecis ...You can reverse the placement of nouns and adjectives because the endings determine their part of speech, not their placement, as in English)
Honestly, the whole mess sounds awful.

"Ex Libris [name]" ....short, elegant.  Wink
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« Reply #15 on: January 10, 2020, 07:22:50 am »

...Could à name be formed to mean "from two libraries"?

Worse and worse! Are you ready?

"Ex Bibliothecis Duabus"  (Or Ex Duabus Bibliothecis ...You can reverse the placement of nouns and adjectives because the endings determine their part of speech, not their placement, as in English)
Honestly, the whole mess sounds awful.

"Ex Libris [name]" ....short, elegant.  Wink

Sorry, I changed my message before your reply. But yeah. It's a mess. It almost sounds "diabolic" (!)
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Deimos
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« Reply #16 on: January 10, 2020, 07:33:20 am »

Yep, saw that ....we obviously move in two very separate inertial reference frames.  Shocked

Both Cicero and Virgil (read a lot of those guys at University) had really elegant writing.
I like to use their writing as models when I make (sometimes lame) attempts at Latin mottos/labels.

FWIW the Latin labels on my "Capt. Nemo keyboard" are quasi fake Latin.
But I wanted the labels to convey a precise meaning so I took some liberties with the eras the words came from and also the definitions.
But the signs themselves are  grammatically correct...impeccably so!  Wink     
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Caledonian
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« Reply #17 on: January 10, 2020, 11:22:48 am »

Quote
EDIT:
Sorry... it just occurred to me....I don't know what you were referring to when you said you have "two".
I assumed you meant two libraries (yours and your partner's)....so can you clarify what you meant by "two of them"? 
(I may have to change my answer substantially.... Grin)

Two stamps. In the heraldry discussion chat I was a part of the whole design would be referred to as "an ex libris" so I assumed that could be used as a name for the object.
Then I wondered what the plural for that object would be.
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Deimos
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« Reply #18 on: January 10, 2020, 12:16:28 pm »

Ok....I think I follow you....I think.

A book plate is a single thing, and the labeling of what is on it is already a plural word (libris).
What is understood (i.e., not actually said) is "from the [collection of the] books of [name]" 

You can't really say Ex Duobus Libris because that would mean "From the two books [of name]"

There may be a way to get the phrasing you want but I don't know what it would be.     
   
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Banfili
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« Reply #19 on: January 10, 2020, 01:02:00 pm »

Hmm, I'm not familiar with Irish heraldry... Really just Scottish and Dutch. And some others from when I was part of a heraldic discussion group.
Do keep in mind silver and white look the same in heraldry

Yes, I know! But ... there is a use for white, when using the colour for a horse or other white animal - my family arms: Arms:  vert, a white horse fully caparisoned thereon a knight in complete armour on his helmet a plume of ostrich feathers his right hand brandishing a sword all proper.
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Caledonian
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« Reply #20 on: January 10, 2020, 02:33:14 pm »



I made another stamp, but no text this time
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von Corax
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« Reply #21 on: January 10, 2020, 07:10:54 pm »

Quote
EDIT:
Sorry... it just occurred to me....I don't know what you were referring to when you said you have "two".
I assumed you meant two libraries (yours and your partner's)....so can you clarify what you meant by "two of them"? 
(I may have to change my answer substantially.... Grin)

Two stamps. In the heraldry discussion chat I was a part of the whole design would be referred to as "an ex libris" so I assumed that could be used as a name for the object.
Then I wondered what the plural for that object would be.
Actually, the name of the object produced by the stamp is "book plate." "Ex libris" is merely a phrase found on many (but not all) book plates.
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« Reply #22 on: January 10, 2020, 11:35:41 pm »

You could try a variation of "supra libros;" perhaps infra libros?"

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supralibros

The biggest problem with Ex Libris and Supra Libros is that both sound like" bad Latin." It's simply not the way that native vulgar Latin speakers would say it. This is the way that medieval Europeans would" chew up" the Latin tongue. Most likely some proper name would be chosen instead.



« Last Edit: January 10, 2020, 11:44:29 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #23 on: January 11, 2020, 12:15:11 am »

Tabula intra librum? Tabula intra librae?  Cheesy I'm just butchering this now  Cheesy
« Last Edit: January 11, 2020, 12:23:14 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Caledonian
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« Reply #24 on: January 11, 2020, 01:10:12 am »

Regardless of what to call them, I made my father one.
Without the actual "ex libris" text thoug

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