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Author Topic: Steampunk Notebook Steampunk Clock  (Read 786 times)
GeorgeCB
Swab

United Kingdom United Kingdom


« on: December 24, 2019, 01:12:51 pm »

Hi

I found this amazing steampunk stuff on DeviantArt by Diarment. He makes amazing steampunk clocks and notebooks and here is an example (https://www.deviantart.com/diarment/art/Steampunk-Clock-III-123976693). Amazingly he mainly uses cardboard. He mentions a couple of times that he will post a tutorial on his blog but so far he hasn't. I had a go making one myself but it looked rubbish so I wonder if anyone can suggest a tutorial that would help me make Diarment type notebook cover. I am interested in the colours he uses and, of course, how to do it reasonably well.

I'm not expecting a response this side of Christmas, but glad tidings to all.

Best

George
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Gregor
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States



« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2019, 10:39:20 pm »

Hmmmm,

Some were very interesting, I liked the cover with the single-eye the best. I was never too good at sculpted compound curves when doing mine.

I have made many short-cut notebooks by buying a notebook and making a notebook out of it LOL. Some small suggestions here today, I could write a few tutorials on this and should prolly do a few videos on it, easier to show than tell.

1) Cardboard is Card-Board, not corrugated cardboard from boxes. Book covers (aka BOARDS) from books whose innards are destroyed (I abhor ripping apart books, typewriters, clocks for 'art') or from cheap children's books at the dollar store or tag sales. Not softcover now hear? hahaa.

2) Do not use rubber-cement. If you can get it PVA (polyvinyl acetate) white glue is good, Elmer's makes one called Craft Bond I think, Brush or Squirt. If only roll-on is available, pop the ball or pierce the bottle.  Sounds a bit randy I'm sorry.

3) Slightly blunt or round corners, just a little to prevent tears (both kinds) but not so much to inhibit a good miter-cut in any coverings.

4) I used a duct-tape called Gorilla Tape for binding the two covers over spines, if the inner part is already bound.

5) Clamps with nice smooth blocks are good for different stages or making, weights.

6) Use waxed paper or release paper to keep things from getting glued together from glue runs, seeps at edges, or seep-through.

7) Hot wax, and hotwax guns were made for book repair, ipso facto they are great for notebook creation. 

8 ) Some of the covers in your examples used hardware, but clasps and embellishments can be found at craft stores, sewing and notions stores, thrift stores (my favorite raw and semi-finished hunting ground) etc.
Oh! eyes at taxidermy shops.

9) For practice, large vinyl, Naugahyde, Suede or <gasp> leather pieces can come from dumps or furniture-upholstery stores from discarded sofas, love-seats, and other furniture (freeze or treat for bed-bugs), or from worn out jackets.

10) Practice and experiment, try, fail, try more, read up on book binding and repair.

You will probably be a master at this by the time I get my first tutorial done  Wink

Cheers! - gNorrie

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Could somebody Pleeease explain to my mother that it is steam PUNK not steam PIMP!?!
Synistor 303
Officer
***
Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2019, 12:11:36 am »

We did bookbinding as part of our Fine Arts degree at Uni - it is quite addictive. There are lots of bookbinding tutorials on YouTube - also search for tutorials on how to paint a leather look. That isn't paper or cardboard covering the book, but obviously vinyl. You can't sew a zipper into paper or cardboard...

There are bookbinding supply places online - have a look and see what they offer so you know what kind of tools you might need. You can substitute most of them with stuff from around the house, but if you want a really sharp finish then you will need a few bookbinding tools.

I have an amazing old brass and steel book-press - it weighs over 100 kilos, which is too heavy for me to bring it upstairs to my study/office, but I plan on setting up a workshop in the downstairs 'junk room' where I can finally use it properly. (I would love an old roller press too, but I doubt the other half would agree to that.)

The first book I ever made (without the benefit of a tutor) was rubbish too, but the cover was made of fabric which made it easier to put on. The paper/cardboard covers need some tools. I have seen some really amazing Steampunk book covers on Pinterest.

Let us know how you get on.
Logged
GeorgeCB
Swab

United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2019, 10:17:11 am »

Hi Gregor

Thanks for your very informative reply. I sent to messages to Diarment to compliment him on his work and I asked him about the cardboard used. He didn't respond but I suspect as he is now selling is work on Etsy for around £50 a piece, he doesn't want to give too much away. Cardboard was the main issue for me. I just cut up an old (corrigated) cardboard box for my 'prototype' hence the fact that it looks like rubbish. After what you said about cardboard vs card board, I googled the latter and the only thing I found was Kraft Board (on Amazon UK) - is this what you were referring to?

Trying to get hold of all the paraphernalia for this project is proving to be difficult. Most of the YouTube tutorials seem to be Russian (!) or American and that makes it difficult to source the materials - particularly the acrylic paint and wax. There is a Polish designer call FINNABAIR who markets her own paints and waxes but they are hard to get hold of in the UK and are expensive.

Anyway, thanks a lot for your advice and I suppose it's 'upwards and onwards' and if I manage to make anything I will post the results on the forum.

Have a great New Year

George
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Deimos
Officer
***
United States United States


aka Countess Millicent Addlewood


« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2019, 11:01:52 am »

I believe the type of cardboard you are discussing is [also] called chipboard.
It is the same stuff (but maybe different thickness) that cereal boxes and other foodstuff boxes (cake mixes, cracker boxes) are made from, at least in the US.
But it is also used in the Arts and Crafts world:
http://www.oren-intl.com/blog/what-is-chipboard-4-important-facts

You might also consider using Mat board; the "cardboard" that comes in a gazillion colors that is used in picture framing. ...it is about 1/16" thick

 
« Last Edit: December 31, 2019, 11:07:38 am by Deimos » Logged

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GeorgeCB
Swab

United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2019, 12:09:44 pm »

I believe the type of cardboard you are discussing is [also] called chipboard.
It is the same stuff (but maybe different thickness) that cereal boxes and other foodstuff boxes (cake mixes, cracker boxes) are made from, at least in the US.
But it is also used in the Arts and Crafts world:
http://www.oren-intl.com/blog/what-is-chipboard-4-important-facts

You might also consider using Mat board; the "cardboard" that comes in a gazillion colors that is used in picture framing. ...it is about 1/16" thick

 


Hi Deimos

Thanks for that - chipboard in the UK is quite different the stuff mentioned in your link but I now have a clearer understanding of what I'm looking for. Certainly the type of board used in picture framing makes more sense.

Thanks again and have a great New Year.

George
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GeorgeCB
Swab

United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2019, 01:42:29 pm »

We did bookbinding as part of our Fine Arts degree at Uni - it is quite addictive. There are lots of bookbinding tutorials on YouTube - also search for tutorials on how to paint a leather look. That isn't paper or cardboard covering the book, but obviously vinyl. You can't sew a zipper into paper or cardboard...

There are bookbinding supply places online - have a look and see what they offer so you know what kind of tools you might need. You can substitute most of them with stuff from around the house, but if you want a really sharp finish then you will need a few bookbinding tools.

I have an amazing old brass and steel book-press - it weighs over 100 kilos, which is too heavy for me to bring it upstairs to my study/office, but I plan on setting up a workshop in the downstairs 'junk room' where I can finally use it properly. (I would love an old roller press too, but I doubt the other half would agree to that.)

The first book I ever made (without the benefit of a tutor) was rubbish too, but the cover was made of fabric which made it easier to put on. The paper/cardboard covers need some tools. I have seen some really amazing Steampunk book covers on Pinterest.

Let us know how you get on.

Hi Synistor 303 - Thanks for your response. I'm doing book binding as such. I have bought some old hardback books and I would like to add the steampunk effects that I saw on Deviant Art by Diarment. He says he uses mainly cardboard for the steampunk artifacts but he is a bit reticent about the type of cardboard. On my first attempt I used an old Amazon cardboard box and the result was c**p. But some other guys on this forum and pointed me in the right direction for the best type of cardboard to use. So I can try again. But thank you for responding.

Have a great New Year.

George
 
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Synistor 303
Officer
***
Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2020, 05:31:11 am »

We did bookbinding as part of our Fine Arts degree at Uni - it is quite addictive. There are lots of bookbinding tutorials on YouTube - also search for tutorials on how to paint a leather look. That isn't paper or cardboard covering the book, but obviously vinyl. You can't sew a zipper into paper or cardboard...

There are bookbinding supply places online - have a look and see what they offer so you know what kind of tools you might need. You can substitute most of them with stuff from around the house, but if you want a really sharp finish then you will need a few bookbinding tools.

I have an amazing old brass and steel book-press - it weighs over 100 kilos, which is too heavy for me to bring it upstairs to my study/office, but I plan on setting up a workshop in the downstairs 'junk room' where I can finally use it properly. (I would love an old roller press too, but I doubt the other half would agree to that.)

The first book I ever made (without the benefit of a tutor) was rubbish too, but the cover was made of fabric which made it easier to put on. The paper/cardboard covers need some tools. I have seen some really amazing Steampunk book covers on Pinterest.

Let us know how you get on.

Hi Synistor 303 - Thanks for your response. I'm doing book binding as such. I have bought some old hardback books and I would like to add the steampunk effects that I saw on Deviant Art by Diarment. He says he uses mainly cardboard for the steampunk artifacts but he is a bit reticent about the type of cardboard. On my first attempt I used an old Amazon cardboard box and the result was c**p. But some other guys on this forum and pointed me in the right direction for the best type of cardboard to use. So I can try again. But thank you for responding.

Have a great New Year.

George
 

I have a sheet of book-cover cardboard (cardboard made specifically for book covers). It is flat, heavy and quite thick and is the old-fashioned cardboard colour. I don't know if there is a special name for it, but it must be common enough if I can just buy it down here in Australia.

I also have a piece of 'craft board' which is useful to use if you are using a lot of glue (it won't buckle or warp). It is really a thin piece of MDF, which is readily available down here. That is for really big tomes that need to be glued and glued.

I would suggest you start with the cardboard, as it is a little easier to manipulate. Take your time and dry in a press (cover the item front and back with baking/silicone paper) between additions. If it is good and hard and dry and FLAT when you start putting the fixing on the front, you will get a really professional finish. Your press can be almost anything from two bits of board between clamps to a pile of heavy books or put it on the floor with a bit of board and a bucket of water on top to weigh it down!

The only tool I would recommend you must have is a thing called a 'bone folder'. They are not expensive and will give all the edges and folds a really neat professional finish. Bone folders are not much to look at, but they make a world of difference.

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GeorgeCB
Swab

United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2020, 01:21:39 pm »

Good morning Synistor 303 and a Happy New Year to you.

The bone folder was a useful tip and I have now ordered one. I also found the card I was looking for so I can have a go at my 2020 project.

George
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Wormster
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United Kingdom United Kingdom



WWW
« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2020, 05:58:52 pm »

AFAIK the material use in uk pitcture framing (Usually the border bit with a cut out for the display piece) is thick cartdrige paper (an ex used to frame pictures for a living). I believe it can be used in other applications such as bookbinding.
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Tread softly and carry a GBFO stick!
Deimos
Officer
***
United States United States


aka Countess Millicent Addlewood


« Reply #10 on: January 03, 2020, 03:03:10 am »

If your cartridge paper is, in fact, the same stuff as what we call Mat Board then, yes, it is very "multi-functional".
I use it with pine to make mock-ups of my wood projects. It allows me to find the design errors early and not waste the more expensive hardwoods. Also use it to make jigs and as compressible "shim" stock..... 1001 uses!  Wink   
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GeorgeCB
Swab

United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #11 on: February 06, 2020, 02:55:08 pm »

This is a follow up question to my previous posts. But firstly, thanks to everyone who helped me with my earlier stuff. I saw an example of a steampunk book cover which had a coiled spring / wire (link - https://torange.biz/cover-book-steampunk-48981). I want to include a coiled spring in my work but I'm having difficulty making it. I've tried paper and card but to no avail. I also bought a load of watch mainsprings from eBay but when uncoiled, they are impossible to re-coil. I  emailed the artists but he never replied. Anyone any suggestions.

Thanks in anticipation.

George
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Synistor 303
Officer
***
Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #12 on: February 07, 2020, 12:09:57 am »

This is a follow up question to my previous posts. But firstly, thanks to everyone who helped me with my earlier stuff. I saw an example of a steampunk book cover which had a coiled spring / wire (link - https://torange.biz/cover-book-steampunk-48981). I want to include a coiled spring in my work but I'm having difficulty making it. I've tried paper and card but to no avail. I also bought a load of watch mainsprings from eBay but when uncoiled, they are impossible to re-coil. I  emailed the artists but he never replied. Anyone any suggestions.

Thanks in anticipation.

George

Try searching for a Quilling tutorial on making a coil. Once painted it should hold its shape fairly well. You might also find the best gsm for the paper. I too have had some 'dealings' with metal clock springs and they are devilishly difficult to manoeuvre, not to mention to glue into place. If you are completely intent on using a real spring, then using dress-making pins to hold the coil shape on the cover material, then glueing it into place (with the right glue) might work... It is hard to tell if the artist has used an entire spring, or a shortened one. From the look of the cover, there does seem to be considerable glue between the coils. The Quilling people might also be able to show they use to keep the paper in the correct shape.
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GeorgeCB
Swab

United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #13 on: February 10, 2020, 09:55:43 am »

This is a follow up question to my previous posts. But firstly, thanks to everyone who helped me with my earlier stuff. I saw an example of a steampunk book cover which had a coiled spring / wire (link - https://torange.biz/cover-book-steampunk-48981). I want to include a coiled spring in my work but I'm having difficulty making it. I've tried paper and card but to no avail. I also bought a load of watch mainsprings from eBay but when uncoiled, they are impossible to re-coil. I  emailed the artists but he never replied. Anyone any suggestions.

Thanks in anticipation.

George

Try searching for a Quilling tutorial on making a coil. Once painted it should hold its shape fairly well. You might also find the best gsm for the paper. I too have had some 'dealings' with metal clock springs and they are devilishly difficult to manoeuvre, not to mention to glue into place. If you are completely intent on using a real spring, then using dress-making pins to hold the coil shape on the cover material, then glueing it into place (with the right glue) might work... It is hard to tell if the artist has used an entire spring, or a shortened one. From the look of the cover, there does seem to be considerable glue between the coils. The Quilling people might also be able to show they use to keep the paper in the correct shape.

Thanks for that - that is exactly what I was looking for. I'd never heard of Quilling so I will be having a go with it. Many thanks again.

George
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