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Author Topic: Of The Steamyness Of Star War Character Zorii Bliss  (Read 1638 times)
chicar
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« on: December 11, 2019, 02:14:01 am »

From The Upcoming Rise Of Skywalker, Here A Character Who Outdo The Franchise Retro Sci Fi Hommage.

Wookiepedia Article:
https://starwars.fandom.com/wiki/Zorii_Bliss

Images:
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EGivOHyW4AYua-m.jpg
« Last Edit: December 11, 2019, 02:17:51 am by chicar » Logged

The word pagan came from paganus , who mean peasant . Its was a way to significate than christianism was the religion of the elite and paganism the one of the savage worker class.

''Trickster shows us how we trick OURSELVES. Her rampant curiosity backfires, but, then, something NEW is discovered (though usually not what She expected)! This is where creativity comes from—experiment, do something different, maybe even something forbidden, and voila! A breakthrough occurs! Ha! Ha! We are released! The world is created anew! Do something backwards, break your own traditions, the barrier breaks; destroy the world as you know it, let the new in.''
Extract of the Dreamflesh article ''Path of The Sacred Clown''
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« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2020, 05:49:05 am »

Ah My Good Chicar

to me the pattern and style look more techno-egyptionish ?

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« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2020, 07:05:51 am »

Ah My Good Chicar

to me the pattern and style look more techno-egyptionish ?

yhs
prof marvel

Same here. Looks late 1970s Buck-Rogerish to me. Maybe even 1982—ish futuristic. There were fashion shoots and album covers between 1977 and 1982 which featured women wearing chrome or metallic bodysuits with simulated helmets, not too different from that.
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chicar
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« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2020, 02:11:01 am »

1920's Buck Rogers big max ! Your vision of 1980's esthetic is very far of the 1980's i knew.
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« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2020, 02:39:05 am »

1920's Buck Rogers big max ! Your vision of 1980's esthetic is very far of the 1980's i knew.


Big Max?  Huh  I was referring to the 1979-1981 Buck Rogers TV show

Buck Rogers In The 25th Century - Intro (SEE DESCRIPTION PLEASE)



I guess our differences may be relative perception. I was in my early teens between 1981-85. How old were you in the same period? I was referring to artwork like this (who is old enough to remember the art of Hojime Sorayama and OMNI magazine?

« Last Edit: January 19, 2020, 02:59:53 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
chicar
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« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2020, 02:49:35 am »

1- big maximum

2- still don’t see the ressemblance. Definitely more steampunk/ decopunk for me.
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« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2020, 03:00:41 am »

1- big maximum

2- still don’t see the ressemblance. Definitely more steampunk/ decopunk for me.

Sorry, I changed my post (real time chat crosstalk) take a look at my post again
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« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2020, 03:37:26 am »


I guess our differences may be relative perception. I was in my early teens between 1981-85. How old were you in the same period? I was referring to artwork like this (who is old enough to remember the art of Hojime Sorayama and OMNI magazine?

I do.  I remember reading the very first issue of OMNI, October 1978.
(Too bad I didn't have the foresight to buy a second copy and keep it in mint condition).
I stopped subscribing to it a few years later (budget constraints), but I always perused the cover art of the latest copy at the brick-and-mortar(!) bookstore.
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« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2020, 04:38:10 am »


I guess our differences may be relative perception. I was in my early teens between 1981-85. How old were you in the same period? I was referring to artwork like this (who is old enough to remember the art of Hojime Sorayama and OMNI magazine?


I do.  I remember reading the very first issue of OMNI, October 1978.
(Too bad I didn't have the foresight to buy a second copy and keep it in mint condition).
I stopped subscribing to it a few years later (budget constraints), but I always perused the cover art of the latest copy at the brick-and-mortar(!) bookstore.


I miss it sorely, Especially the opportunity to read from the likes of Carl Sagan, Stephen Hawking and Peter Ustinov with Sci-fi illustrations in one single magazine!

It just occurred to me there is a link between Diesel and 1980—ish pop art. If you were young back then you would have noticed a lot of "retro" art. The start of the "New Wave" period was highly futuristic replete with Cyberpunk, but in a retro way. Think of Sir Run Run Shaw, David People & Hampton Fancher's "Blade Runner." It had a lot of diesel references (1940s film noir, fashion) .A lot of early 80s fashion had elements of Diesel and Steam (Thomas Dolby), and most importantly Fritz Lang's 1927 movie "Metropolis" was redone as a giant music video featuring contemporary pop music, by director Giorgio Moroder in 1984.

Metropolis (Giorgio Modorer) - 1984 Trailer


It seems to me that all the robot-girl tropes, eg Sorayama's "Gynoid" series of illustrations, even Thierry Mugler's fashion (see below) were basically inspired by the "Maria" robot. And what about C3PO in Star Wars?? There's a video explicitly stating C3PO was derived from Maria. During the late 70s and mid 80s a lot of people were re-visiting old Sci-Fi, and perhaps Metropolis was a favorite topic among futurists....

Thierry Mugler photoshoot



« Last Edit: January 19, 2020, 04:57:56 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2020, 04:58:52 pm »

It seems to me that all the robot-girl tropes, eg Sorayama's "Gynoid" series of illustrations, even Thierry Mugler's fashion (see below) were basically inspired by the "Maria" robot. And what about C3PO in Star Wars?? There's a video explicitly stating C3PO was derived from Maria. During the late 70s and mid 80s a lot of people were re-visiting old Sci-Fi, and perhaps Metropolis was a favorite topic among futurists....

In the seventies there was a revival in interest in the art deco style, and in silent films. Just about every book about robots, silent film, or science fiction cinema from that period had a photo of the Metropolis robot.
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« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2020, 11:19:10 pm »

It seems to me that all the robot-girl tropes, eg Sorayama's "Gynoid" series of illustrations, even Thierry Mugler's fashion (see below) were basically inspired by the "Maria" robot. And what about C3PO in Star Wars?? There's a video explicitly stating C3PO was derived from Maria. During the late 70s and mid 80s a lot of people were re-visiting old Sci-Fi, and perhaps Metropolis was a favorite topic among futurists....

In the seventies there was a revival in interest in the art deco style, and in silent films. Just about every book about robots, silent film, or science fiction cinema from that period had a photo of the Metropolis robot.

Yeah. The images were stolen quite often too. A Spanish New Wave group called Mecano also included Metropolis footage in some of their videos and as far as I know they were not affiliated with Giorgio Moroder's project.
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chicar
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« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2020, 12:43:35 am »

1920's Buck Rogers big max ! Your vision of 1980's esthetic is very far of the 1980's i knew.




I guess our differences may be relative perception. I was in my early teens between 1981-85. How old were you in the same period?



Between 0 and 2. And Zorrii more brass (The color of steampunk) than chrome (the color of raypunk you reffering)
« Last Edit: January 26, 2020, 12:46:54 am by chicar » Logged
chicar
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« Reply #12 on: January 26, 2020, 12:49:40 am »



In the seventies there was a revival in interest in the art deco style, and in silent films.

Might explain our issue.
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« Reply #13 on: January 26, 2020, 06:50:38 am »



In the seventies there was a revival in interest in the art deco style, and in silent films.

Might explain our issue.

I think that's the link.

I just realized that helmet side profile looks a bit like the helmet in Disney's 1991 film, The Rocketeer, which was deliberately a 1930s story.  Cheesy

Art Déco was very subtle, but it was all around if you paid attention, especially after 1979. Architecture saw revival of Art Déco in the Postmodernism movement. The same thing happened in pop fashion (eg Siouxie of Siouxie and the Banshees mixed Kabuki makeup with a 1920s Flapper look. What happened is that designers were trying to escape the Psychedelic 60s and the Plastic 70s, so "modern" required a "hard Neo-Conservative edge" and often designers turned to the 1930s and 1950s for inspiration. Like Blade Runner, the dystopian future required elements from the past.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2020, 07:02:38 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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« Reply #14 on: February 06, 2020, 01:21:54 am »

steampunk? No, not to me.

The brass might harken to it, but nothing about the lines and crafting feels like an 1800s thing.  i could see it jiving with 1920's rocketeer or later...

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