The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
December 11, 2019, 10:50:43 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: What's a good word for steampunk currency?  (Read 249 times)
Aetheric Aviatrix
Swab

United States United States



« on: November 18, 2019, 03:55:37 pm »

Like many I assume here, I am in the process of writing a story with the steampunk setting backdrop. I would like to include a type of coin currency with a unique name, but I’m having trouble coming up with a word for it, so I thought I’d try my luck and ask here to see if any of you creative individuals have any ideas you wouldn’t be opposed to me using? Currently, all I have in mind is “skrill,” which I’m really not married to.

For reference, some other terms out there in various other fictions include gil, credit, cred, zenny, tokens, shards, caps, rupees, etc.

Thanks for any suggestions or for even helping to spark some ideas!
Logged
chicar
Rogue Ætherlord
*
Canada Canada


Student in Techno-Shamanism and Lyncanthrope

Chicar556
WWW
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2019, 05:37:54 pm »

When Came To Steampunk, You Can’t Never Go Wrong With Taking Inspiration From History:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_historical_currencies

My Favorite From The List:Stelo, Talent, Dinar, Mark
« Last Edit: November 18, 2019, 05:54:30 pm by chicar » Logged

The word pagan came from paganus , who mean peasant . Its was a way to significate than christianism was the religion of the elite and paganism the one of the savage worker class.

''Trickster shows us how we trick OURSELVES. Her rampant curiosity backfires, but, then, something NEW is discovered (though usually not what She expected)! This is where creativity comes from—experiment, do something different, maybe even something forbidden, and voila! A breakthrough occurs! Ha! Ha! We are released! The world is created anew! Do something backwards, break your own traditions, the barrier breaks; destroy the world as you know it, let the new in.''
Extract of the Dreamflesh article ''Path of The Sacred Clown''
Cora Courcelle
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2019, 06:09:59 pm »

I'd probably pick a name that goes with the sort of steampunk world you are creating, and where its influences come from. If it's an alternative type history why not use the 'regular' world name, but obviously face details would be different - it might be Paul Revere on the dollar bill rather than George Washington ... or Benedict Arnold, (depends on what's happened).
Logged

You have to tread a fine line between avant-garde surrealism and getting yourself sectioned...
Aetheric Aviatrix
Swab

United States United States



« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2019, 07:58:20 pm »

When Came To Steampunk, You Can’t Never Go Wrong With Taking Inspiration From History:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_historical_currencies

My Favorite From The List:Stelo, Talent, Dinar, Mark
Oh hey, this is a great reference! Thank you. I also like some of those that you suggested from the list too quite a bit.  Smiley
Logged
Aetheric Aviatrix
Swab

United States United States



« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2019, 08:04:00 pm »

I'd probably pick a name that goes with the sort of steampunk world you are creating, and where its influences come from. If it's an alternative type history why not use the 'regular' world name, but obviously face details would be different - it might be Paul Revere on the dollar bill rather than George Washington ... or Benedict Arnold, (depends on what's happened).
This brings up a good point! I probably should have elaborated a bit more. I’m basically having my story take place on a sister world to Earth, or in a parallel universe. It’s very similar to Earth, but with notable differences (alternate names for things, different political figures, slightly different terrain for each region, etc.). It’s as if life on Earth had evolved in a slightly different way.

So, using a different person’s face on the currency would work perfectly for this purpose.
Logged
Newchurch
Snr. Officer
****
England England


WWW
« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2019, 12:25:28 pm »

I'm old enough to remember British pre-decimal currency.
Twelve pennies to a shilling.
Twenty shillings to a pound.

If you were buying from someone posh you would be charged in guineas (a pound and a shilling).  I never saw a guinea coin.  I think they were originally gold and (at first) worth twenty shillings.  A gold sovereign also has a face value of one pound, but is now actually worth very much more (a few hundred pounds).

Half a crown was two and six (two shillings and sixpence).  That was a coin.

A crown (not often seen) was five shillings.

There was also a two bob coin (two shillings); very similar to half a crown, but smaller.

Pennies were sub-divided into ha'pennies and farthings.  There were coins for those too.

And there was also a small, silvery sixpence coin and a multi-sided threepence (a thr'penny bit).  In earlier times there was also a groat, worth four pennies.

I think the lowest denomination note was ten bob (10 shillings).

So, in summary:

Four farthings (or two ha'pennies) to a penny.

Twelve pennies to a shilling (which could be a single coin, two sixpences, four thr'penny bits or three groats).

Twenty shillings to a pound (which could be a pound note, a sovereign, or a guinea coin).  A pound could also be made up from eight half-crowns or four crowns.

Twenty-one shillings to a guinea (which did not have a coin).

Why so complicated?  It was easy to divide money by two, three, four, five, six, eight...

Also it originated from a finger abacus system.  You can use your thumb against the joints on you fingers on one hand to add and subtract in units of 12 (pennies in shillings).  With the other hand's fingers you can keep track of another five, so your hands become a base-60 abacus.
Logged
Aetheric Aviatrix
Swab

United States United States



« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2019, 04:21:12 pm »

Wow, this is absolutely fascinating, Newchurch. Thank you so much for this detailed response and your insight! I love too that the reasoning for such conversions was due to the finger abacus.
Logged
Newchurch
Snr. Officer
****
England England


WWW
« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2019, 12:01:28 am »

Wow, this is absolutely fascinating, Newchurch. Thank you so much for this detailed response and your insight! I love too that the reasoning for such conversions was due to the finger abacus.


There's a phrase in a Terry Pratchett book where he describes the curves and twists of one of the main city streets as being like that because it's the way the cows went to the river. 

I looked up a couple things, to check my memory was right, and found this fascinating website on UK coins down the ages.  The full story is very much more complicated, over hundreds of years of history.  There are coins I might have known about, and others I knew nothing about. 

For example, there were, as coins, (in the Empire, not England) fractional farthings (as small as 1/12 or 1/16 penny), three-farthings (3/4 penny), and in Britain, a penny-ha'penny (1 1/2 penny), a half groat (still used as Maundy money), the gold noble (80 pence; 1/3 pound), a leopard (3 shillings), a half-angel or double-florin (4 shillings).  There was also a rose half-noble (with the value of a crown (5 shillings).

A third-guinea was worth seven shillings (and of course, the guinea was the appropriate unit to use if ever you needed to divide the loot by seven).

Angels were double-crowns (half a pound).  Except for the times when they had a different value.

There are many other names of coins, and values.  If interested, have a look here:  http://www.coins-of-the-uk.co.uk/values/fives.html
Logged
Melrose
Gunner
**
Australia Australia



« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2019, 03:13:46 am »

Ah, Newchurch, you take me back! Not to mention weights, lengths and so on. And then suddenly we went decimal and ruined it all!
For what it may be worth, I use this link for occasional props (labels, travel tickets, paper money). Perhaps a browse will inspire, not just for naming, but to add atmospheric descriptive details.

https://colnect.com/en
Logged
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #9 on: November 20, 2019, 05:22:46 am »

You could also play around with the shape of coins. Everyone knows about Chinese coins with a hole, but I remember from an old Animé "Wings of Honneamise" an alternate quasi-Asian Earth set in something similar to the 20th century, and they used metal sticks as coins, and the 1970s Battlestar Galactica's "Cubits" currency were square (?)
Logged

Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia



« Reply #10 on: November 20, 2019, 06:52:31 am »

You could also play around with the shape of coins. Everyone knows about Chinese coins with a hole, but I remember from an old Animé "Wings of Honneamise" an alternate quasi-Asian Earth set in something similar to the 20th century, and they used metal sticks as coins, and the 1970s Battlestar Galactica's "Cubits" currency were square (?)

The early settlement of New South Wales was plagued by a shortage of coins, to the extent that rum become the common 'unit' of currency. The problem had a partial solution - the "holy" dollar. The holey dollar, valued at five shillings, were created by stamping the centres out of 40,000 imported Spanish silver eight-real coins, known as “pieces of eight”. The middle, or “dump” became a secondary coin worth 15 pence.

When we went decimal, the famous (but ill-fated) 50 cent coin was round, and there were also one and two dollar notes, (larger denomination notes were 5, 10, and 20 dollars, later followed by 50 and 100 dollar notes), and one and two cent coins. Then the round 50 cent coins were found to have much more than 50 cents worth of silver and were being hoarded! The design was changed to (somewhat surprisingly for a decimal coin) to a 12 sided one! The one dollar and two dollar notes disappeared as well, to be replaced by one and two dollar coins, and the one and two cent coins also disappeared and were not replaced. If you make purchases in Australia, the total cost is rounded up or down to the nearest five cents. Five cent coins are kept in circulation almost purely because they are the principle form of donation to the annual "Give Me Five for Kids" charity campaign!

The decimal coins are not suitable for use in Christmas puddings, so many families have a small stash of sixpences (aka 'zacs'), and threepenny (treys) bits for use at Christmas!
« Last Edit: November 20, 2019, 06:55:57 am by Banfili » Logged
Synistor 303
Officer
***
Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #11 on: November 20, 2019, 12:12:52 pm »

Iron drecker

Money
Logged
RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
*****


« Reply #12 on: November 20, 2019, 05:46:24 pm »

How different is your book's world from the real world?
Logged
Kensington Locke
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #13 on: November 20, 2019, 11:40:39 pm »

scrip
scril
legal tender

Logged
Athanor
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Canada Canada


Keep them off-balance and brazen it out!


« Reply #14 on: November 22, 2019, 03:02:35 am »

On the subject of pre-decimal British currency:

A two-bob (two shilling) coin was also, historically, known as a Florin.
A pound was a "quid" - no idea why.
And for some reason lost in the mists of time: a ten-bob (ten shilling) note was also, in Northern England at least, known as " 'alf a nicker"; but, oddly enough, a pound was never a "nicker"; always a quid. That's slang for you.

And, no, Steampunk isn't dying; we've barely got started.

Athanor.
Logged

"Truly I say to you, he who seeks, shall find. And quite often, he shall wish he hadn't."

              - Elias Ashmole Crackbone.
RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
*****


« Reply #15 on: November 23, 2019, 01:11:37 am »

Do away with paper and metal currency. Pay for everything with brass charge plates with telegraph codes punched into them like music box disks.
Logged
Wormster
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United Kingdom United Kingdom



WWW
« Reply #16 on: November 23, 2019, 11:06:43 am »

In one fictional universe I created for my micro kids years ago we had a currency that was based on the decimal system where 100 Zots equalled 1 Jarret. Zots came in 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 units (very much in the vein of current english currency) with the Jarrets following in 5, 10, 20 and 50 units. Zots were small prisims containing captured moonbeams and the Jarrets were coin made from the scales of hunted Sky Kracken.
Logged

We are the BEC,
And this we must confess,
Whatever is worth doing,
We'll do it to excess!
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.139 seconds with 16 queries.