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Author Topic: The Tourist Trap Thread  (Read 835 times)
chicar
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« on: October 22, 2019, 03:20:10 pm »

I must have been 10 or so , during a trip in the USA, when i visited the so called World Smallest Desert. At this age, you think is normal for a desert to not be bigger than your backyard but over the years i understood more why my parents was reluctant to go .

What Your Tourist Trap Story ?
« Last Edit: October 23, 2019, 01:57:50 am by chicar » Logged

The word pagan came from paganus , who mean peasant . Its was a way to significate than christianism was the religion of the elite and paganism the one of the savage worker class.

''Trickster shows us how we trick OURSELVES. Her rampant curiosity backfires, but, then, something NEW is discovered (though usually not what She expected)! This is where creativity comes from—experiment, do something different, maybe even something forbidden, and voila! A breakthrough occurs! Ha! Ha! We are released! The world is created anew! Do something backwards, break your own traditions, the barrier breaks; destroy the world as you know it, let the new in.''
Extract of the Dreamflesh article ''Path of The Sacred Clown''
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« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2019, 05:34:49 pm »

As a kiddie, walking up some gawd forsaken Welsh Mountain in the mist and rain with "Its ok Boi there's a cafe at the top!" bloddy good liar is T'owd Man we were on Cnicht not Snowdon!
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« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2019, 05:48:30 pm »

The Wisconsin Dells when I was seven years old, which was 1974. It was a wonderland of small amusement parks. Prehistoric Land (dinosaurs), Kiddie Land (rides), and the old west theme park who's name escapes me were the highlights of the trip.

The old west park was great; every day there was a bank robbery, train robbery, bank robbery, and even a steamboat robbery, all according to a schedule that you were given when you entered the park. The robber was Black Bart, who of course dressed all in black, and the kids were all deputized by the sheriff to help in the arrest. The map of the park showed "Black Bart's Secret Tunnel" which took you to the other side of the park, so I took a walk through it with my older sisters. When you first entered the tunnel, there were two wooded half walls that you passed, each on opposite sides of the tunnel. Beyond that, the tunnel was lit by overhead lights, but there was a small area where the lights seemed to be burned out. As we approached that shadowy point, Black Bart himself appears from the shadows and reached for his pistol. We screamed and turned back to the tunnel entrance. The way back out appeared to be blocked by a full wooden wall; it was actually the two half walls, which from that direction looked like one solid wall. We found our way back out, and did not go back to the tunnel again.

Not everything in the Dells was as good as the western park, and some were just plain seedy. A place called Fairy Tail Gardens put a bumper sticker on my grandfather's car while we were inside the park.

At night there was the downtown which was full of souvenir shops and small attractions. There was an arcade full of mechanical arcade machines that in the mid 1970's we didn't know would soon become historic relics.

There was also the Circus World museum, near the Dells, which had a museum, an actual big top circus, and a daily circus parade.

Something that is missing nowadays is the old Stuckey's gas station chain; an a-frame building full of cheesy souvenirs like Indian tom-toms with rubber drum skins, miniature birch-bark canoes, little can-shaped mooing cow noisemakers, and snapping alligator heads on sticks. Some of the larger locations had food counters. All had pecan log candy.
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Rockula
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« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2019, 07:06:40 pm »

Gnome Magic Garden, Colchester, Essex, UK.

A fiver per adult is about £10 too much for an entry fee.

The gnomes looked old, tired, dirty and unloved.
The gnome 'museum' consists of two corner display type units containing a few gnomes and a book. Nothing was labelled.
The vast areas of the 'gnome woodland' is distinctly lacking in any gnomes whatsoever.
The 'gift shop' just sells 'standard' garden gnomes and a few comedy milk jugs.
They could improve the shop by simply adding gnome magic thimbles, rainbow rubbers or stationary.

There isn't even any history or background to where gnomes originated or why this country is covered in them.

Pathetic.
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« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2019, 09:08:30 pm »

For me its got to be The Dracula Experience in Whitby, which is so dire it almost qualifies as brilliant.  But it did get us out of the cold wind for ten minutes, so I suppose it wasn't all bad.
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Rockula
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« Reply #5 on: October 23, 2019, 01:04:32 pm »

For me its got to be The Dracula Experience in Whitby, which is so dire it almost qualifies as brilliant.  But it did get us out of the cold wind for ten minutes, so I suppose it wasn't all bad.

Did you know that it was a conversation in there around 1992 that was the spark for Jo Hampshire to start thinking about the Whitby Goth Festival that started in 1994? The Vampyre Society had a gathering in Whitby (about 50 people at most) every year from 1990 which 'morphed' into what it has now become. We used to pay a visit to The Dracula Experience despite it's obvious tackiness. Smiley
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Banfili
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« Reply #6 on: October 23, 2019, 02:19:03 pm »

Offhand, I can't think of anywhere I've been that has been trap-like - maybe I just don't go to the right places!
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RJBowman
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« Reply #7 on: October 23, 2019, 04:16:00 pm »

Offhand, I can't think of anywhere I've been that has been trap-like - maybe I just don't go to the right places!


If you took a road trip across America in the 1970's you would have seen billboards for hundreds of them. You could usually tell a tourist trap without having to visit.

Here's one that I actually visited:
http://clui.org/ludb/site/birds-eye-view-museum

The guy built a miniature replica of downtown Wakarusa, Indiana in the basement of his house. He charged $3 per person at the door.
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Cora Courcelle
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« Reply #8 on: October 23, 2019, 07:25:45 pm »

For me its got to be The Dracula Experience in Whitby, which is so dire it almost qualifies as brilliant.  But it did get us out of the cold wind for ten minutes, so I suppose it wasn't all bad.

Did you know that it was a conversation in there around 1992 that was the spark for Jo Hampshire to start thinking about the Whitby Goth Festival that started in 1994? The Vampyre Society had a gathering in Whitby (about 50 people at most) every year from 1990 which 'morphed' into what it has now become. We used to pay a visit to The Dracula Experience despite it's obvious tackiness. Smiley

Then thank heavens for it, as we are off to Whitby tomorrow for the goth weekend ... hence the weather forecast of rain and cold  Cheesy
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #9 on: October 23, 2019, 09:23:16 pm »

"The Thing" roadside attraction along Interstate Highway 10, between El Paso, Texas and Tucson, Arizona. The "Thing" is the worst possible scam on tourists braving this very long desert road in the hottest part of the United States. I think it's fair to say that the pathetic attraction (a "mummy that basically looks like it was made from dust sprinkled papier mâche) pales in comparison to the series of signs posted along the road for many many miles.

Used to go by every summer vacation on my way to California from Mexico City, after stopping by San Antonio and Austin to visit family. I am so glad we never stopped by. We could tell it was a scam 40 years ago.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thing_(roadside_attraction)
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