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Author Topic: How Plastic Was Problematic In The Victorian Age  (Read 94 times)
chicar
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« on: September 29, 2019, 02:20:18 pm »

One Word: Plastic
https://youtu.be/2LkRXYBI4SQ
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« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2019, 02:10:59 am »

Ah Yes, the problems with Celluloid....

when the billiard balls went BOOM
and the corset stays caught fire

see, the issue is not so much "plastics"  ... the problem is celluloid

Celluloids are a class of compounds created from nitrocellulose and camphor.

Generally considered the first thermoplastic, it was first created as Parkesine in 1856 and as Xylonite in 1869, before being registered as Celluloid in 1870. Celluloid is easily molded and shaped, and it was first widely used as an ivory replacement.

However, due to the fact that is is based on an explosive and volatile organic solvents.......  "booms" can happen.

The early photographic film stock was all celluloid based, particularly movie film. This led to movie studios and theaters being a very real fire hazard.

In fact, for many many years (even today) , second- and third-world countries actually relied on chopped-up movie film for rifle cartridge propellant.
 
Early "other" plastics that were much safer were  Gutta-Percha (plastic from the latex of Malaysian trees),  Bois Durci  (wood sawdust mixed with ox blood), cassein (milk-plastic),  and  bakelite (a thermosetting phenol formaldehyde resin).

yhs
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« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2019, 03:41:49 am »

Ah Yes, the problems with Celluloid....

when the billiard balls went BOOM
and the corset stays caught fire

see, the issue is not so much "plastics"  ... the problem is celluloid

Celluloids are a class of compounds created from nitrocellulose and camphor.

Generally considered the first thermoplastic, it was first created as Parkesine in 1856 and as Xylonite in 1869, before being registered as Celluloid in 1870. Celluloid is easily molded and shaped, and it was first widely used as an ivory replacement.

However, due to the fact that is is based on an explosive and volatile organic solvents.......  "booms" can happen.

The early photographic film stock was all celluloid based, particularly movie film. This led to movie studios and theaters being a very real fire hazard.

In fact, for many many years (even today) , second- and third-world countries actually relied on chopped-up movie film for rifle cartridge propellant.
 
Early "other" plastics that were much safer were  Gutta-Percha (plastic from the latex of Malaysian trees),  Bois Durci  (wood sawdust mixed with ox blood), cassein (milk-plastic),  and  bakelite (a thermosetting phenol formaldehyde resin).

yhs
prf mvl
Indeed, for many years it was illegal to carry cinema film on public transport.
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