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Author Topic: Keeping cool with SP. Suggestions, devices and methods.  (Read 1050 times)
Madasasteamfish
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09madasafish
« on: August 27, 2019, 06:28:47 pm »

Well, having returned home from the Asylum, a thought occurred to me, based on several discussions and experiences whilst there and so I thought I'd throw this one out to the BG hivemind.

Huh How does one keep cool and hydrated at an SP event?  Huh

Temperatures in Lincoln this weekend were in excess of 30oC (which although common in some parts of the world is almost unheard of here in the UK, but look set to continue) and there were several cases of heat stroke/exhaustion over the course of the festival. Although everyone is now ok, almost all the attendees were suffering from the heat, so I thought I'd do my public duty and give people the opportunity to share their thoughts and any possible solutions to this problem.
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« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2019, 10:41:10 pm »

From what I heard on the news you have recently experienced brief spikes in temperature well in excess of 30 C, more like above 40, am I right? You've already joined the "above 100F club" led by the Antipodes and the US for English speaking countries, if I understand correctly.

I've been thinking the same at my job. I work at a location with no air conditioning, and I'm not exaggerating that indoor temperatures could be in excess of 43 C (110 F).

One of the things I was told by a customer was that there is this type of vest with pockets made to insert freezable packs that you place in your refrigerator overnight. Vests are Steampunk. I'm sure an explorer's vest could be fitted with freezer packs.

The second idea is to use new technology such as solid state coolers with conducting surfaces places in contact to the neck of the person to be cooled, like a "refrigerated scarf"

The other idea I've seen around is the hats equipped with fans. The problem is that above a certain temperature fans do not work and instead of cooling they will actually deposit heat by way of forced convection. The issue is that forced convection can either cool or heat up a surface depending on the temperature of the air relative to the surface to be treated (this is a microscopic molecular effect where air molecules will act as energy sponges and temporarily move energy from /to the surface)
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Synistor 303
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« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2019, 12:30:41 am »

It's kind of cool down-under at the moment, especially here in Melb, but we know a few things about keeping cool on hot days, so here goes;

Wet a T-shirt, then spin it out until it is just damp, and then put it on. As it dries you will get cool. This works really well.

Wet your hair. As it dries you will get cool.

Practice 'temperature control' i.e. close curtains the minute the sun touches the glass. It might make the rooms dark, but it makes a huge difference.

Don't wear shoes or socks. Wet your feet every now and then and let them dry.

How can you adapt these things to a Steampunk festival? Um... I dunno. Have lots of cool water available. Have lots of water-misting bottles available. Have lots of shade available. Not very Steampunk I'm afraid.
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Banfili
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« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2019, 01:35:22 am »

Actually, Synistor, water-misting bottles could be SP, as could smaller, spritzer type bottles, especially some of the beautiful glass ones!

I am sure the spray tops on modern spray bottles could be modded by some of the genius tinkerers we have on this forum, and the bottles themselves suitably disguised.

Filled with chilled water - bliss - and I have a beautiful glass water bottle that is ripe for conversion!

Living about four hours north-east of Melbourne, and having just reminded myself that I have several spray-top bottles lying around the place, and if this summer coming is as bad as last summer (which is on the cards!), I will be filling and chilling all the spray-top bottles I can find!

And I might even SP them, on a very basic level - contact is wonderful stuff, when used correctly - especially to decoupage a bottle!
« Last Edit: August 28, 2019, 01:47:22 am by Banfili » Logged
morozow
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« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2019, 08:05:26 am »

Water spray. For example in the form of a satchel. Which will spray water dust on you. And it will create a cool and can look in style.
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Madasasteamfish
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09madasafish
« Reply #5 on: August 28, 2019, 09:19:54 am »

Well these are certainly some interesting suggestions.

I'll admit the idea of a waistcoat with pouches for ice packs is something I'd thought of, and I'm sure there's someone on here with sufficient sewing skills to be able to produce one.

The damp t shirt suggestion is slightly dubious (layers and all that) but water misters could be easily done, using say an old perfume bottle (the kind with a bulb sprayer) which could work nicely as a belt hanger.
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von Corax
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« Reply #6 on: August 28, 2019, 12:07:19 pm »

Pith helmet. The real ones are designed to be soaked in water, and then provide evaporative cooling to the head.
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Synistor 303
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« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2019, 12:28:06 am »

Pith helmet. The real ones are designed to be soaked in water, and then provide evaporative cooling to the head.

We used to get a catalogue of dubious stuff - in amongst the donkey cigarette dispenser and shampoo for "full body hair"... was a Pith Helmet. It came with a tube and bottle and was designed so the kids could 'pith' in it on long car journeys. (!!!) Probably not the way they wet them in the olden days.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2019, 06:30:53 am »

Pith helmet. The real ones are designed to be soaked in water, and then provide evaporative cooling to the head.

We used to get a catalogue of dubious stuff - in amongst the donkey cigarette dispenser and shampoo for "full body hair"... was a Pith Helmet. It came with a tube and bottle and was designed so the kids could 'pith' in it on long car journeys. (!!!) Probably not the way they wet them in the olden days.

Isn't there an archaic law, somewhere in some local jurisdiction in the UK, whereby police officers were obliged to offer their helmet in case a pregnant woman needed to "pith"??
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2019, 06:39:35 am »

Pith helmet. The real ones are designed to be soaked in water, and then provide evaporative cooling to the head.

I believe Uncle Bert made a pith helmet with a battery powered electric fan?

May I suggest exploring Peltier /thermoelectric cooling elements under the helmet? I'm. Not sure if that is even practical /feasible given power requirements.
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von Corax
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« Reply #10 on: August 29, 2019, 01:10:24 pm »

Pith helmet. The real ones are designed to be soaked in water, and then provide evaporative cooling to the head.

We used to get a catalogue of dubious stuff - in amongst the donkey cigarette dispenser and shampoo for "full body hair"... was a Pith Helmet. It came with a tube and bottle and was designed so the kids could 'pith' in it on long car journeys. (!!!) Probably not the way they wet them in the olden days.

Isn't there an archaic law, somewhere in some local jurisdiction in the UK, whereby police officers were obliged to offer their helmet in case a pregnant woman needed to "pith"??
IIRC this has been discussed here previously. I believe this was in the days when police constables wore armoured top hats, and the hat was intended to be used as a modesty guard, not as a receptacle.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #11 on: August 29, 2019, 05:08:54 pm »

Modesty? No matter how big the hat, that'd be much less than the required Victorian coverage. I'd thought at least the service uniform coat should be used as a curtain!

I do agree the law sounded very odd to me.  Tongue  Cheesy
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Miranda.T
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« Reply #12 on: August 30, 2019, 06:18:37 pm »

Actually, Synistor, water-misting bottles could be SP, as could smaller, spritzer type bottles, especially some of the beautiful glass ones!

I am sure the spray tops on modern spray bottles could be modded by some of the genius tinkerers we have on this forum, and the bottles themselves suitably disguised.

Filled with chilled water - bliss - and I have a beautiful glass water bottle that is ripe for conversion!

Living about four hours north-east of Melbourne, and having just reminded myself that I have several spray-top bottles lying around the place, and if this summer coming is as bad as last summer (which is on the cards!), I will be filling and chilling all the spray-top bottles I can find!

And I might even SP them, on a very basic level - contact is wonderful stuff, when used correctly - especially to decoupage a bottle!

Water spray. For example in the form of a satchel. Which will spray water dust on you. And it will create a cool and can look in style.

For ages I've been meaning to steam-up a water pistol with a misting nozzle attahced to achieve such an effect. As I have yet to get around to that, I've been resorting to using my hand-held fan on the hottest days - it's a nice big one and has done the job pretty well.

Yours,
Miranda.
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Kensington Locke
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« Reply #13 on: August 31, 2019, 02:54:49 pm »

If you google up "welding cooling vest" there's plenty of results.  Including ones with coils of tubes or pockets for ice packs.

I like the idea of steampunked spritzers and fans.

Perhaps another aspect to consider is the forms of garb and materials worn in warmer climates during Victorian times? Straw hats in the summer, etc.



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« Reply #14 on: August 31, 2019, 02:58:53 pm »

I was at Asylum as well and my hand fan never left my side.  After the event, I went off to London and the fan was a life-saver in the Underground.  I saw quite a few women using them there.  Smartest item that I took with me.  I suspect they're going to be the next trendy must-have -- lightweight, no batteries required, can be used to block the sun if you have no hat or sunglasses, usually cheap enough not to cause consternation if lost.
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Melrose
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« Reply #15 on: September 15, 2019, 06:25:06 am »

Was at a local steam fest yesterday in a Jules Verne diving suit. The first warm day down here this spring, only 24º (in summer we hit 40º regularly), but it was a bit humid. I walked round in a sauna all day. All I could do was rest regularly, open or take off the helmet sometimes, and take frequent sips of water. The other options above may or may not work but hydration is essential. If you start approaching the really hot weather, alongside your health and safety, the costume becomes less important! Wink
 
« Last Edit: September 15, 2019, 06:26:37 am by Melrose » Logged
Miranda.T
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« Reply #16 on: September 15, 2019, 11:11:36 am »

Was at a local steam fest yesterday in a Jules Verne diving suit. The first warm day down here this spring, only 24º (in summer we hit 40º regularly), but it was a bit humid. I walked round in a sauna all day. All I could do was rest regularly, open or take off the helmet sometimes, and take frequent sips of water. The other options above may or may not work but hydration is essential. If you start approaching the really hot weather, alongside your health and safety, the costume becomes less important! Wink
 

You have my admiration - that is real dedication to the cause of Steampunk! The irony here in the UK is that as we move into the cooler autumnal weather, much more comfortable for outfits, the events start to become far fewer. I suppose Christmas just overtakes everything else as we get into November/December and January & February can be just too grim to risk putting things on.
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RJBowman
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« Reply #17 on: September 15, 2019, 05:43:13 pm »

At comic and scifi shows I've seen stormtrooper helmets with built in battery-operated fans to keep the wearer cool and well ventilated. It wouldn't be applicable to many steampunk costumes, but I thought it was notable enough tom mention.
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Miranda.T
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« Reply #18 on: September 15, 2019, 09:15:40 pm »

At comic and scifi shows I've seen stormtrooper helmets with built in battery-operated fans to keep the wearer cool and well ventilated. It wouldn't be applicable to many steampunk costumes, but I thought it was notable enough tom mention.

Hmm, I'm wondering about a variation on the old ceiling mounted fans (not the rotary type, the oversized hand-fan type). Maybe you could rig up a Heath Robinson construction with such a fan mounted on a hat and operated by a series of pulleys and wires as one walked along...

Yours,
Miranda.
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Madasasteamfish
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09madasafish
« Reply #19 on: September 15, 2019, 09:42:47 pm »

At comic and scifi shows I've seen stormtrooper helmets with built in battery-operated fans to keep the wearer cool and well ventilated. It wouldn't be applicable to many steampunk costumes, but I thought it was notable enough tom mention.

Hmm, I'm wondering about a variation on the old ceiling mounted fans (not the rotary type, the oversized hand-fan type). Maybe you could rig up a Heath Robinson construction with such a fan mounted on a hat and operated by a series of pulleys and wires as one walked along...

Yours,
Miranda.

I suppose it would be possible to mount something like a PC case cooling fan into the top/side of a hat (IIRC they're usually rigged up to run on 12V DC so they wouldn't need too big a battery pack) to vent hot air. Or with 2 mounted front and back they could create a through draft to cool the head...
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #20 on: September 19, 2019, 07:08:41 am »

At comic and scifi shows I've seen stormtrooper helmets with built in battery-operated fans to keep the wearer cool and well ventilated. It wouldn't be applicable to many steampunk costumes, but I thought it was notable enough tom mention.


Hmm, I'm wondering about a variation on the old ceiling mounted fans (not the rotary type, the oversized hand-fan type). Maybe you could rig up a Heath Robinson construction with such a fan mounted on a hat and operated by a series of pulleys and wires as one walked along...

Yours,
Miranda.


I suppose it would be possible to mount something like a PC case cooling fan into the top/side of a hat (IIRC they're usually rigged up to run on 12V DC so they wouldn't need too big a battery pack) to vent hot air. Or with 2 mounted front and back they could create a through draft to cool the head...


If I remember correctly, Uncle Bert used an external canister module for the battery.

Look at the "Hat and Helmet Modification Thread" in Anatomical

http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,49464.msg993325.html#msg993325
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Antipodean
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« Reply #21 on: September 20, 2019, 04:31:56 am »

Found this - Steam Power Fan. Click link for movie.
https://img-9gag-fun.9cache.com/photo/aDgGrmK_460sv.mp4

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« Reply #22 on: September 20, 2019, 07:16:23 pm »


Perhaps another aspect to consider is the forms of garb and materials worn in warmer climates during Victorian times? Straw hats in the summer, etc.





This is an excellent suggestion. I have been exploring older fabrics that breathe, such as handkerchief linen, voile and lawn, during the wretched American summers. Ladies’ light summer dresses were made from lawn long ago, and I have an Edwardian pattern that would work nicely in lawn. I’m not into leather, corsets, tight layers or hardware, so a steampunk belt and some other details would be adequate for me. Hand fans and parasols are great ideas, too.

Oh well, it’s fall here so this won’t be needed for awhile yet.

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Lizzie Cogsworthy
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« Reply #23 on: October 12, 2019, 03:43:34 pm »

If your costume involves some manner of jetpack or backpack, you could make room for the bladder-and-tube from a camelbak.

Hydration is the most important part of cooling, after all! With a bit of work, I'm sure a suitably steampunk nozzel could be devized, and some manner of woven cloth covering for the tube.

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