Author Topic: The Brassgoggles Model Making Club (the second non-SP model making thread).  (Read 47499 times)

James Harrison

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Looking forward...
Persons intending to travel by open carriage should select a seat with their backs to the engine, by which means they will avoid the ashes emitted therefrom, that in travelling generally, but particularly through the tunnels, prove a great annoyance; the carriage farthest from the engine will in consequence be found the most desirable.

Madasasteamfish

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Erm... could someone please take my credit card away? Or at least do something to hinder/prevent me shipping online?

I've just secured a pair of die-cast buses for use on Dukeswood (either as is or reference for appropriate public transport liveries), and it took a force of will not to add anything else to the basket...

You didn't listen to me did you? I've been ebay and acquired a pair of LMS PTOs, so I'm well on my way to having a mail train. The latest additions to my reference library have also set the gears turning, and looking into other titles is pushing me further towards pre-grouping.
I made a note in my diary on the way over here. Simply says; "Bugger!"

"DON'T THINK OF IT AS DYING, JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH."

James Harrison

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Do we need to confiscate Paypal* privileges?

*other methods of payment permissible

Madasasteamfish

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Do we need to confiscate Paypal* privileges?

*other methods of payment permissible

It might do, but then that might encourage me to visit physical model shops, which would give me ideas.

I'm not joking. Someone's recently had their collection of railway periodicals donated to a local charity shop and I've picked up about a dozen or so for interesting/relevant looking articles and I've found a few titbits flicking through them that have set the gears turning.

It also doesn't help that it's helping push me towards pre-grouping (for research purposes at the very least).

The Bullet

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New project starting:

I am looking for any info on the green livery of the early Problem class locos (LNWR).
Which shade of green would that be?
Any name, BS or RAL code would be helpful.
What about the cab inside, frames, wheels? Which colour is right?
Is there any lining/pinstriping?
If brute force does not work....you´re not using enough of it.

James Harrison

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Is this of assistance?



I think this print dates from the 1960s.  There's also a description of 'Lady of the Lake''s paint scheme of 1860 in Ernest F Carter's Britain's Railway Liveries. 

The Bullet

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Hi James,

thanks, this is a good piece to my puzzle.
I do not have this book.
I have Maskelyne's "locomotives I have known" and found a description in the second book.
I also odered: Edward Talbot- A history of LNWR Engines.
Hotspur also offer parts like the slotted splashers (a nightmare to machine from scratch), cab and smokebox parts,....
There is also a nice Teutonic class loco for sale now in 3.5" gauge.
I already habe the Problem class as a project but maybe......

Synistor 303

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Judging by the age of the locomotive, the paint used would probably have been Emerald Green, or Scheele's Green, or Schloss Green, or Paris Green containing copper arsenite.

James Harrison

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Hi James,

thanks, this is a good piece to my puzzle.
I do not have this book.
I have Maskelyne's "locomotives I have known" and found a description in the second book.
I also odered: Edward Talbot- A history of LNWR Engines.
Hotspur also offer parts like the slotted splashers (a nightmare to machine from scratch), cab and smokebox parts,....
There is also a nice Teutonic class loco for sale now in 3.5" gauge.
I already habe the Problem class as a project but maybe......

Copied verbatim from my copy of Carter's 'Britain's Railway Liveries':

The engine 'Lady of the Lake' No.531 (2-2-2 tender), when built and running on the Northern Division, was painted (6) [note in back of book there's a swatch or colour chart- 6 is a sort of bluish emerald green sort of a colour- JH], described in sources as bluish-green.  Boiler-banding was in black, as also was the colour of the smoke-box and upper half of the cylinders.  Buffer beams were red (vermilion), panelled with black; but their tops and ends were green.  The plates between the buffers and the beam were black, and the shanks were green; whilst the actual end ring of the shanks was black. 
The fender sides were green, but the top plates of the fender sides were vermilion red, the sanding-lever being also this colour.  The dome was green.  Number-plates were of cast brass with black figures, and wheels were green with black tyres.  The front wheel splashers were green with black casings and heavily-lined fronts.  The cylinder lubricator cocks were bright brass.  The rail round the top of the cab sides as well as the vertical supporting stanchions were of bright steel.  The top of the chimney was of polished brass, and the safety-valve lever of bright steel.  The tender-sides and back were green, panelled out with a black outside line and a white inner, both with incurved corners.  The tender-springs and axleboxes were green, but the spring-buckles were black.  Brakeshoes were black, as were the brake-hangers and track guard-irons, together with the axle-box tie-rods.  The transverse brake-rodding was vermillion red. 
The main-frame of the tender was green, lined ot finely with black, and the rear buffer-beam was vermillion red between the guard-iron attachments, but green between the latter an the end of the beams.  The buffers were painted in the same style as those on the engine.  The tender water-scoop handle was painted vermillion red. 
The inside of the cab front was painted vermillion red in its top half, and black below; whereas the insides of the cab sides were painted vermillion red all over. 
The shape of the number-plates was rectangular, with incurved corners, and the lines of rivets down the sides of the tender hornplates were painted black. 
When first built the engine had a polished brass beading round the cab end of the fire-box, and the spectacle-plate rms and safety-valve casings were also of polished brass.  The tender axle-boxes also had brass lids. 

The Bullet

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Thanks for the info.

This is what I have been lookig for.
One open point remains: Nothing is said about the inside of the splashers.
I have seen a picture of a model with slotted splashers.
Looking through the slots, the inside of the splashers was vermillion.
I have found nothing to confirm that yet.

James Harrison

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Good, better, best.  I'm going to keep the details under my hat a little while yet but these are not long for this world. 




MWBailey

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Good, better, best.  I'm going to keep the details under my hat a little while yet but these are not long for this world. 








! (haven't commented on this thread much, since most of my modeling life is in the past tense, but been thinking of starting back up on the old N scale layout. So, maybe in the not-so-far-flung future...).

Anyway...

I hope you mean you're reworking them. I love the old "varnish" coaches (American term for our 19th century passenger rolling stock, referring to the heavy use of that kind of exterior finish used on them back in the day).

By the way, I've forgotten your preferred modeling scale...
Walk softly and carry a big banjo...

""quid statis aspicientes in infernum"

“WHAT?! N0!!! NOT THAT Button!!!”

The Bullet

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Hi James,

looking good. Please show us more pictures. (and info aboout the prototype).

Even though I wanted "no other project beside the Problem Class loco", the inevitable has happened.
Another "Running restoration" is heading for my workshop.

James Harrison

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I hope you mean you're reworking them. I love the old "varnish" coaches (American term for our 19th century passenger rolling stock, referring to the heavy use of that kind of exterior finish used on them back in the day).

By the way, I've forgotten your preferred modeling scale...

I'm not precious when it comes to replacing or reworking things as better models become available or my skills improve.  In this case I'm replacing my semi-scratchbuilt Barnum carriages with 3D printed kit versions, the saloon carriages will likely be a like-for-like replacement however the brake carriages will be a huge improvement over the current models.  I'll be salvaging the bits I can reuse (couplers, buffers, wheels and the roof profile) but the rest is likely to end up in the scrapyard. 

These are the same scale as the rest of my 'stuff'- 1:76, or 4mm to the foot (though for various boring historical reasons running on HO gauge (16.5mm) track). 

Hi James,

looking good. Please show us more pictures. (and info aboout the prototype).

Even though I wanted "no other project beside the Problem Class loco", the inevitable has happened.
Another "Running restoration" is heading for my workshop.

Barnum carriages, built 1910 by the Great Central at their carriage works in Dukinfield, Manchester.  Around 60' long and ordered as 'excursion' stock but in reality also used on express and long-distance services to provide third class dining accommodation.  Four survive in preservation.

Madasasteamfish

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I definitely need my PayPal privileges removed. I've just acquired a decent rake of 9 Gresley teak coaches on Ebay.

I've also had the dreaded "inspiration" from flicking through my research periodicals.
First off this this image of a Spam can pulling into Doncaster at the head of a charter train.

Which has convinced me that I can justify something similar as Spam cans are a perennial favourite of model makers, or with one of my GWR Kings (either on a charter or a named express as part of the LNER/GWR loco exchange trials).

The other is this little LSWR branch line terminus which might well work for my circuitous test track.


Partly because I'm reasonably familiar with the protype location and the embankment opposite the platform could well help hide the loop.

Mercury Wells

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I haven't a clue if the following article* (with pictures)The Valleys railway stations that have either vanished or remained frozen in time. is going to be of use to anyone?.


*(C) WoL. '22.
Oh...my old war wound? I got that at The Battle of Dorking. Very nasty affair that was, I can tell you.

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The Bullet

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The Problem class loso has some real problems.
right valve rod dies not line up with the expansion link.
All dimensions on the cylinders and valve chests are identical to the left cylinder.
Frame is straight.
Still trying to figure out where the error is.
Slide valves are far too long.
Will take some time before she will run on air.