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Author Topic: The Brassgoggles Model Making Club (the second non-SP model making thread).  (Read 40722 times)
James Harrison
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« Reply #550 on: July 11, 2021, 08:45:52 pm »

Well, in a limited and very specific fashion work has actually begun on building Red Lion Square's main station block. 

A few years ago you may recall I bought a Walther's City Station kit with the intention of Anglicising it.



I went with this particular model because it looks a nice size, it's the right material (I mean a model of a specifically brick building rather than stone or timber), it's got the architectural details that suggest the right build date and it's not the sort of station kit that turns up on almost every single model railway in the UK (have a glance through a couple of back issues of the top two or three model railway magazines in the UK and count how many times the kit I used as the basis for Cremorne for Pittance crops up, built straight out of the packet). 

It's not just a case of tweaking a few details to make it more convincingly a UK station though, it's a case of making it convincingly specifically the sort of station that the Great Central Railway would have built in the middle 1900s, had it found itself in need of building a new mid-sized terminus somewhere.  I believe I am correct in saying that the last mid-sized or above station that the GCR built was Nottingham Victoria, which opened in 1900.  Unfortunately it was pulled down in 1967 (except for the clock tower) but luckily there are a large number of photographs of it around that I can fall back on.  Even better, not only are there a few surviving large 1890s GCR stations still in use (Marylebone, which being the London terminus is a bit of a unique design, but also Loughborough Central which was a more typical big-town station, also of course Quorn and Woodhouse and Rothley), there's also been one restored quite recently for other uses (Leicester Central).  So there's a number of these stations I can go and look at and take photographs and notes and sketches and work something up that looks correct and makes all the right nods in all the right directions. 

But that just leaves 1) sorting out the building plan so that I don't end up with facades that don't work and 2) sorting out how I'm actually going to do the conversion work. 

Well 1) is still a work in progress, it's surprisingly difficult to find scaled floor plans of the station buildings.  2) however I think I can progress because I've recently taken delivery of a privately-published work on Leicester Central, which would appear to be a gold mine of all the little details that I need.  And I think I've puzzled out how I might go about it, because the kit is built as a large number of subassemblies and each wall panel is two or three plastic mouldings built up over each other, I think I'll be able to use more of the kit than originally appeared possible, even though much of it will exist just as a scaffold that I can hang my own facades off. 

So to that end this evening I've started building up some of the wall panels.





Of course it is all going to have to stay flatpack until I'm ready to actually erect the building. 
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James Harrison
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« Reply #551 on: July 13, 2021, 09:23:06 am »







For 60 year old toolings, these carriages do actually scrub up quite well.  I repainted them and applied new transfers a few months ago, but now I've also picked out the door handles and handrails with a paintpen.  I'm planning to experiment with a new acrylic matt varnish for these.
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Madasasteamfish
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« Reply #552 on: August 18, 2021, 05:20:13 pm »

Well things have been a bit quiet here on the fish front by simple dint of my latest relocation and not being able to fit my modelling stuff in the car. But since I've gone home I've been able to bring stuff back. My next project is sorting out this Midland compound kit.



It mainly needs some minor bits and sorting out the motor and pick ups which is going to be fun as I've never done it before. I've also been able to source a tender from a 4f kit.
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« Reply #553 on: August 19, 2021, 03:22:49 am »

I have a question for all you train buffs out there... (which no doubt will have you rolling your eyes, but here goes anyway).

I have just bought this train set; https://www.hobbyco.com.au/oo-valley-drifter-train-set ; which is the Hornby Valley Drifter. It looks like a nice little set, and reasonably priced for Australia.

Now try not to snort in horror, but I bought it to go around our Christmas tree, which is decorated in blue and silver. I am going to paint the non-blue parts of the train to make it more aesthetically pleasing (to me). This should not be too much of a problem, as I am an artist, so am capable of doing it properly. (And I can assure you that no glitter *shudder* will be involved in any way shape or form.)

I would like the engine to be very shiny, so my question is; If I use a high gloss varnish over the artist acrylic paint, will I get a really nice high-gloss finish?





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Madasasteamfish
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« Reply #554 on: August 19, 2021, 07:11:34 am »

I have a question for all you train buffs out there... (which no doubt will have you rolling your eyes, but here goes anyway).

I have just bought this train set; https://www.hobbyco.com.au/oo-valley-drifter-train-set ; which is the Hornby Valley Drifter. It looks like a nice little set, and reasonably priced for Australia.

Now try not to snort in horror, but I bought it to go around our Christmas tree, which is decorated in blue and silver. I am going to paint the non-blue parts of the train to make it more aesthetically pleasing (to me). This should not be too much of a problem, as I am an artist, so am capable of doing it properly. (And I can assure you that no glitter *shudder* will be involved in any way shape or form.)

I would like the engine to be very shiny, so my question is; If I use a high gloss varnish over the artist acrylic paint, will I get a really nice high-gloss finish?



Depends on the finish of the paint probably. If the paint has a gloss finish, then yes, if it's matt then a gloss varnish will make it shinier but that may not work for your purposes. It might also be an idea to try out the paint and varnish on something else, or a small patch first to avoid any nasty surprises.
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SeVeNeVeS
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« Reply #555 on: August 19, 2021, 11:32:45 am »

I have a question for all you train buffs out there... (which no doubt will have you rolling your eyes, but here goes anyway).

I have just bought this train set; https://www.hobbyco.com.au/oo-valley-drifter-train-set ; which is the Hornby Valley Drifter. It looks like a nice little set, and reasonably priced for Australia.

Now try not to snort in horror, but I bought it to go around our Christmas tree, which is decorated in blue and silver. I am going to paint the non-blue parts of the train to make it more aesthetically pleasing (to me). This should not be too much of a problem, as I am an artist, so am capable of doing it properly. (And I can assure you that no glitter *shudder* will be involved in any way shape or form.)

I would like the engine to be very shiny, so my question is; If I use a high gloss varnish over the artist acrylic paint, will I get a really nice high-gloss finish?


Maybe try automotive spray lacquer, but being cellulose based it could react and lift/ crackle the acrylic, so as  Madasasteamfish suggests, a tester piece first.

I use it on alot of things and have never been let down.............. yet.

Be warned though, it does smell, so out of the house, well ventilated area etc etc.
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Synistor 303
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« Reply #556 on: August 20, 2021, 01:48:14 am »

I have a question for all you train buffs out there... (which no doubt will have you rolling your eyes, but here goes anyway).

I have just bought this train set; https://www.hobbyco.com.au/oo-valley-drifter-train-set ; which is the Hornby Valley Drifter. It looks like a nice little set, and reasonably priced for Australia.

Now try not to snort in horror, but I bought it to go around our Christmas tree, which is decorated in blue and silver. I am going to paint the non-blue parts of the train to make it more aesthetically pleasing (to me). This should not be too much of a problem, as I am an artist, so am capable of doing it properly. (And I can assure you that no glitter *shudder* will be involved in any way shape or form.)

I would like the engine to be very shiny, so my question is; If I use a high gloss varnish over the artist acrylic paint, will I get a really nice high-gloss finish?


Maybe try automotive spray lacquer, but being cellulose based it could react and lift/ crackle the acrylic, so as  Madasasteamfish suggests, a tester piece first.

I use it on alot of things and have never been let down.............. yet.

Be warned though, it does smell, so out of the house, well ventilated area etc etc.

Thank you. (I was sure I'd cop a bit of flak for changing the train to a naff Christmas one...) I did see one online that had been painted all different pastel colours, then covered in glitter. It was ghastly, and there was no coming back from that - no amount of paint could 'fix' that glitter... The train police need to arrest that woman.

I am really enjoying the planning and the making, but I am a bit worried it might be the beginning of something bigger... I am already thinking of doing a 'proper' Christmas train for my daughter, then after that I could make a Christmas village with a few trains driving through a snow-covered landscape - little Christmas trees dotted about the hills, kids on sleds sliding down, shops decorated with Christmas things...

...this is how it starts, isn't it...


Will post pictures when I am done.
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SeVeNeVeS
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« Reply #557 on: August 21, 2021, 02:32:09 pm »

I am an artist

Ever thought of sharing? If not on topic, Tactile, then elsewhere, like here in Off topic, just an inquisitive thought.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #558 on: August 21, 2021, 03:31:51 pm »

I have a question for all you train buffs out there... (which no doubt will have you rolling your eyes, but here goes anyway).

I have just bought this train set; https://www.hobbyco.com.au/oo-valley-drifter-train-set ; which is the Hornby Valley Drifter. It looks like a nice little set, and reasonably priced for Australia.

Now try not to snort in horror, but I bought it to go around our Christmas tree, which is decorated in blue and silver. I am going to paint the non-blue parts of the train to make it more aesthetically pleasing (to me). This should not be too much of a problem, as I am an artist, so am capable of doing it properly. (And I can assure you that no glitter *shudder* will be involved in any way shape or form.)

I would like the engine to be very shiny, so my question is; If I use a high gloss varnish over the artist acrylic paint, will I get a really nice high-gloss finish?







That is an interesting question. I would not paint lacquer or enamel on top of acrylic. I imagine you're talking about water based acrylics. On this side of the world there are acrylic gloss overcoats, but I've never used them. A more permanent version is to remove the old paint (if acrylic) or just sand it (if the original finish is not water based, which is most likely) and use hobby spirit/oil based lacquers or enamels  (eg Testors brand enamels), and preferably in spray form using masking tape to cover what you don't want painted. Usually hobby lacquers have a really wide range of colors and clear coats, plus the mildest of solvents available.

Next level up for a more permanent color is your typical household lacquer spray can. And up from that with the most durable finish but the most toxic solvents are the automotive paints both brush retouch and spray cans.

The top of durability and crackle free paints is automotive engine block ceramic/epoxy paints. That's a nearly indestructible finish, but it's by far the most toxic.

For the little plastic train set, I think hobby lacquers should be fine. Sanding the surface with 800 (super fine) grit sandpaper should be enough for most ABS type plastics.

Household clearcoat enamels are wonderful, but one word of caution: perfect gloss is difficult to achieve in humid conditions. For many years I used to clear coat my copper Steampunk ware, and I noticed that in rainy or humid days I could never achieve a perfect clear coat, it was more like satin finish. Dry and cold weather produces the shiniest clearest coat! There's no reason to believe that hobby lacquers would behave any differently.

Not that's so relevant for this train set, but FYI, the best clear coat of all will be the ceramic automotive engine block clear coat. You need to practice because you can't make mistakes since there's very few solvents that can clean it up, but if you master that clear coat, you'll never go back to using any other kind of clear coat.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2021, 03:43:35 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Madasasteamfish
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« Reply #559 on: August 21, 2021, 04:32:53 pm »

I am an artist

Ever thought of sharing? If not on topic, Tactile, then elsewhere, like here in Off topic, just an inquisitive thought.

I do believe there is a 2d art thread somewhere on here...
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Sir Henry
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« Reply #560 on: August 21, 2021, 05:11:32 pm »

On models with too many protrusions to allow masking tape to stick or too many fiddly areas, Blutac (or the cheapest substitute you can find) works very well for masking out areas.
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Synistor 303
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« Reply #561 on: August 22, 2021, 01:32:59 am »

On models with too many protrusions to allow masking tape to stick or too many fiddly areas, Blutac (or the cheapest substitute you can find) works very well for masking out areas.

I find you can use plastic kitchen wrap in some of the more awkward places - pulling and stretching it to go round or under things. It comes off cleanly and easily and is faster than using masking tape. Cut thin strips for tiny areas.
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Synistor 303
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« Reply #562 on: August 22, 2021, 01:34:57 am »

I am an artist

Ever thought of sharing? If not on topic, Tactile, then elsewhere, like here in Off topic, just an inquisitive thought.

I do believe there is a 2d art thread somewhere on here...

What I meant was; I have lots and lots of acrylic paint and don't want to buy special model train paint...
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The Bullet
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« Reply #563 on: August 29, 2021, 10:38:52 am »

Work continues on the Tich.
Took the bell-cranks out and fitted them permanently (hope so) to the shafts, eliminated the remaining clatter in the motion, opened the steamchests to check the timing again.
Valve travel was OK but the ports opened only a bit.
Checking the dimensions and translating 1/16", 3/32" etc. to mm I found that both slide valves were too long by more than 1 mm.
With a valve travel of about 4mm this makes a difference.
Filing brass is no fun....
Fixed now, everything looks fine and I am waiting for the endless rain to stop so I can test it on the rolling road.
Meanwhile I am bending some tracks for a small circle of 3.5" track.
This will be a portable layout as I already have a fixed 5" layout. Die to the pointwork there, a third rail is no option.
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Synistor 303
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« Reply #564 on: August 29, 2021, 01:24:32 pm »

The Hornby train set I got is the lowest common denominator colour-wise. The engine was one-piece of red plastic on a black chassis, so I felt no pain painting it out. I didn’t want to pay a lot for a detailed engine that I was going to paint.

Having said that, the engine looks ten times better after several coats of prussian blue mixed with silver acrylic, which gave it a deep blue metallic finish. It looks far more realistic than the original bright red plastic colour. I have a high gloss acrylic varnish that I might not even use on it, as it looks good as it it. Just waiting for a silver paint pen to touch up some of the detail. I am hoping that the pen will give me better silver coverage than using a paintbrush and the silver acrylic paint I have, then I will take some pictures.


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The Bullet
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« Reply #565 on: September 03, 2021, 05:50:03 pm »

3.5" track circle: finished.

First test run with the TICH: OK....for a few metres before the right bell-crank came loose again and I was running on one cylinder only.

Note: I used the real mean Loctite. The absolutely permanent (hopefully) version.
While the loco was in parts I also cleaned the water gauge glass and blowdown valve and gave the boiler a washout with vinegar and rinsed with hot water.

After putting it together I ran it on compressed air on the rolling road and everything worked.
Let´s wait how it works under steam.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2021, 12:01:38 pm by The Bullet » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #566 on: September 04, 2021, 03:27:05 pm »

The Hornby train set I got is the lowest common denominator colour-wise. The engine was one-piece of red plastic on a black chassis, so I felt no pain painting it out. I didn’t want to pay a lot for a detailed engine that I was going to paint.

Having said that, the engine looks ten times better after several coats of prussian blue mixed with silver acrylic, which gave it a deep blue metallic finish. It looks far more realistic than the original bright red plastic colour. I have a high gloss acrylic varnish that I might not even use on it, as it looks good as it it. Just waiting for a silver paint pen to touch up some of the detail. I am hoping that the pen will give me better silver coverage than using a paintbrush and the silver acrylic paint I have, then I will take some pictures.




Good to hear it worked out. Maybe use a piece of cardboard to test the varnish? I knew it existed, but in never used it.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #567 on: September 04, 2021, 06:26:50 pm »

This is what I have been working on, on and off, for the last few months- repainting and detailing Hornby (ex-Triang) clerestory carriages.





This is the last one of the... five? six?, almost finished.  Just handrails to pick out with a fine brush/ paint pen now. 
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Madasasteamfish
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« Reply #568 on: September 27, 2021, 09:44:25 am »

Well my midland compound has been completed



I'm quite pleased with it since I've had to fashion pickups for it although I've still got to sort out the drive.

I know a rivet counter might object to the tender but I can justify it easily for serval reasons.
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The Bullet
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« Reply #569 on: October 03, 2021, 12:03:40 pm »

Forget the rivet counters.

Some of those have never even built anything.

Freelance and "what if" models are ok and a "not so detailed" build also.

You made it, you enjoy it and it looks good.

Big project coming up for me.
Due to Brexit, Covid, UK lorry driver shortage, the "small" parcel that should have been delivered September 13th is still on the island.

Watch this space....
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Madasasteamfish
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« Reply #570 on: October 03, 2021, 12:45:28 pm »

Forget the rivet counters.

Some of those have never even built anything.

Freelance and "what if" models are ok and a "not so detailed" build also.


Well, I wouldn't call it freelance or a 'what if' since it IS a Fowler design and the lifespan of these engines covers his tenure as CME of both the MR and LMS, coupled with the LMS practice of numbering tenders rather than cabsides it wasn't impossible for engines to show different numbers on the tender and smokebox door and tbh having seen the one surviving example recently I'd say it looks right.
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The Bullet
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« Reply #571 on: October 10, 2021, 10:44:00 am »

Yesterday TIGER did the fist metres under her own steam.-

Fired up, pushed her forward and backwards in the process to check if the pistons would lock again.
They did not.

Then out onto the turntable, open the regulator and off we went.....only to come to a sudden stop after half a lap.
(on the point furthest away from the steaming bays of course.)
Lost 2 eccentrics, both coupling rods disconnected, lost two crankpins, several nuts,.....

Towed her back and inspected the damage.
Nothing. Fortunately one of the traction engine guys had a bottle of loctite with him.
So we disassembled, cleaned and put everything back in place.
(Feels strange to use loctite to persuade a pin to stay put).
Resurrected the fire.
Folks were placing bets then if I would make it into the station or loose major parts like the boiler on the way there.
Quoting Stalight Express: "Or worse they'll find him scattered in a million rusty pieces round the track"

It worked this time. I left the steaming bays, made it uphill through the station, uphill again to the far side.
Did not dare to whistle as I needed every bit of steam to get up the gradient as the safety valves did not shut properly.
Then then long downhill run with the regulator shut and the blower open, round the bend and into the uphill section passing the steaming bays:

Here we come:
https://youtu.be/csY9WVqkjm4

You can hear some of the folks cheering as I went by.

Tiger goes like a cheetah.

Some things left to do:
-sort out safety valves
-Gab valve gear is hard to reverse, needs to be looked at
-finish connections to crosshead pump
-finish tender pipework
-details

Minx also took part.
I was not sure to take her to that track as I had not tested the new piston rings.
After 13 years and many miles the old ones started to blow by.
Minx was like new.
Loud, short exhaust beats. Steam consumption was less than before.
We had her in steam for the whole day.
During the last few laps I went into the gradient at less than half walking pace and then opened up just to the point before the wheels would slip.
I could watch bits of coal and ash being ejected from the smokebox.
After the run (6 hours continuous) there was just a thin layer of ash (left) in the smokebox and only a little bit of clinker on the grate.
Minx is back to running order.

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« Reply #572 on: October 22, 2021, 05:24:56 am »

Yesterday TIGER did the fist metres under her own steam.-

Fired up, pushed her forward and backwards in the process to check if the pistons would lock again.
They did not.

Then out onto the turntable, open the regulator and off we went.....only to come to a sudden stop after half a lap.
(on the point furthest away from the steaming bays of course.)
Lost 2 eccentrics, both coupling rods disconnected, lost two crankpins, several nuts,.....

Towed her back and inspected the damage.
Nothing. Fortunately one of the traction engine guys had a bottle of loctite with him.
So we disassembled, cleaned and put everything back in place.
(Feels strange to use loctite to persuade a pin to stay put).
Resurrected the fire.
Folks were placing bets then if I would make it into the station or loose major parts like the boiler on the way there.
Quoting Stalight Express: "Or worse they'll find him scattered in a million rusty pieces round the track"

It worked this time. I left the steaming bays, made it uphill through the station, uphill again to the far side.
Did not dare to whistle as I needed every bit of steam to get up the gradient as the safety valves did not shut properly.
Then then long downhill run with the regulator shut and the blower open, round the bend and into the uphill section passing the steaming bays:

Here we come:
https://youtu.be/csY9WVqkjm4

You can hear some of the folks cheering as I went by.

Tiger goes like a cheetah.

Some things left to do:
-sort out safety valves
-Gab valve gear is hard to reverse, needs to be looked at
-finish connections to crosshead pump
-finish tender pipework
-details

Minx also took part.
I was not sure to take her to that track as I had not tested the new piston rings.
After 13 years and many miles the old ones started to blow by.
Minx was like new.
Loud, short exhaust beats. Steam consumption was less than before.
We had her in steam for the whole day.
During the last few laps I went into the gradient at less than half walking pace and then opened up just to the point before the wheels would slip.
I could watch bits of coal and ash being ejected from the smokebox.
After the run (6 hours continuous) there was just a thin layer of ash (left) in the smokebox and only a little bit of clinker on the grate.
Minx is back to running order.






One of the things I want to do some day. Just a larger gauge with a semblance of a cab I can squeeze my corpulent bulk into (rains A LOT here).
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The Bullet
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« Reply #573 on: October 23, 2021, 03:43:18 pm »

Then you should look up the TINKERBELL loco design by Roger Marsh.

7.25" or 7.5", big cab, lots of power.
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« Reply #574 on: October 23, 2021, 07:21:41 pm »

I've been thinking of doing some sort of model making, using a lot of the same techniques and possibly scales as some model making... only I'd like to do them as isometric forms. with a textured and dimensional construction (stone and wood floors, doors and windows, stairs, etc.  all isometic so they could essentially tile onto a wall or something like that. It probably sounds stupid but I'm curios enough to try it.

I've also debated about making things like making model rugs with some experiemental flocking ideas.
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