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Author Topic: Louis Lunch: The Alleged Oldest Hamburger Joint In The US  (Read 414 times)
chicar
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Chicar556
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« on: April 08, 2019, 03:13:45 pm »

Hamburg Steak Like In The Old Day:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis%27_Lunch
www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Pnj_E5XFG4
« Last Edit: April 08, 2019, 03:28:29 pm by chicar » Logged

The word pagan came from paganus , who mean peasant . Its was a way to significate than christianism was the religion of the elite and paganism the one of the savage worker class.

''Trickster shows us how we trick OURSELVES. Her rampant curiosity backfires, but, then, something NEW is discovered (though usually not what She expected)! This is where creativity comes from—experiment, do something different, maybe even something forbidden, and voila! A breakthrough occurs! Ha! Ha! We are released! The world is created anew! Do something backwards, break your own traditions, the barrier breaks; destroy the world as you know it, let the new in.''
Extract of the Dreamflesh article ''Path of The Sacred Clown''
RJBowman
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« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2019, 05:25:40 pm »

I think I ate the oldest hamburger in the U.S. once.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2019, 10:00:07 pm »

I think I ate the oldest hamburger in the U.S. once.

Just go to any convennience shop...
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2019, 10:06:14 pm »

The thing about the hamburger is that it's also claimed to have been invented by many. The instance I knew was the  appearance of the hambureger at the 1904 St. Louis World Fair.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamburger

Quote

There have been many claims about the origin of the hamburger, but the origins remain unclear.[4] The popular book "The Art of Cookery made Plain and Easy" by Hannah Glasse included a recipe in 1758 as "Hamburgh sausage", which suggested to serve it "roasted with toasted bread under it". A similar snack was also popular in Hamburg by the name "Rundstück warm" ("bread roll warm") in 1869 or earlier,[5] and supposedly eaten by many emigrants on their way to America, but may have contained roasted beefsteak rather than Frikadeller. Hamburg steak is reported to have been served between two pieces of bread on the Hamburg America Line, which began operations in 1847. Each of these may mark the invention of the Hamburger, and explain the name.

There is a reference to a "Hamburg steak" as early as 1884 in the Boston Journal.[OED, under "steak"] On July 5, 1896, the Chicago Daily Tribune made a highly specific claim regarding a "hamburger sandwich" in an article about a "Sandwich Car": "A distinguished favorite, only five cents, is Hamburger steak sandwich, the meat for which is kept ready in small patties and 'cooked while you wait' on the gasoline range."

According to Connecticut Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro, the hamburger, a ground meat patty between two slices of bread, was first created in America in 1900 by Louis Lassen, a Danish immigrant, owner of Louis' Lunch in New Haven.[7] There have been rival claims by Charlie Nagreen, Frank and Charles Menches, Oscar Weber Bilby, and Fletcher Davis.[8][9] White Castle traces the origin of the hamburger to Hamburg, Germany with its invention by Otto Kuase.[10] However, it gained national recognition at the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair when the New York Tribune referred to the hamburger as "the innovation of a food vendor on the pike".[9] No conclusive argument has ever ended the dispute over invention. An article from ABC News sums up: "One problem is that there is little written history. Another issue is that the spread of the burger happened largely at the World's Fair, from tiny vendors that came and went in an instant. And it is entirely possible that more than one person came up with the idea at the same time in different parts of the country.



And the origin may be an inspiration from actual "Hamburg Steak" or :

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamburg_steak

Quote
Hamburg and its port[edit]

The port of Hamburg in the 1890s.
Minced meat was a delicacy in medieval cuisine, red meat usually being restricted to the higher classes.[11] Very little mincing was done by medieval butchers or recorded in the cookbooks of the time, perhaps because it was not part of the sausage-making process that preserve meat. Russian ships brought recipes for steak tartare to the port of Hamburg during the 17th century,[12] a time when there was such a great presence of Russian residents there that it was nicknamed "the Russian port." Trade within the Hanseatic League between the 13th and 17th centuries made this port one of the largest in Europe, its commercial importance being further heightened as it became vital to early transatlantic voyages during the age of steam. In the period of European colonization of the Americas, immigrants to this port were a "bridge" between old European recipes and the future development of the hamburger in the United States.[13]
During the first half of the 19th century, most of the northern European emigrants who traveled to the New World embarked on their transatlantic voyages from Hamburg. The German shipping company Hamburg America Line, also known as the Hamburg Amerikanische Packetfahrt Actien-Gesellschaft (HAPAG), was involved in Atlantic transport for almost a century.[14] The company began operations in 1847 and employed many German immigrants, many of them fleeing the revolutions of 1848–9. The vast majority of settlers and emigrants from various parts of northern Europe also began voyages to the United States from Hamburg, introducing the culinary customs to state they come into.[14] New York City was the most common destination for ships traveling from Hamburg, and various restaurants in the city began offering the Hamburg-style steak in order to attract German sailors. The steak frequently appeared on the menu as a Hamburg-style American fillet,[15][16] or even beefsteak à Hambourgeoise. Early American preparations of minced beef were therefore made to fit the tastes of European immigrants, evoking memories of the port of Hamburg and the world they left behind.

Hamburg steak[edit]
In the late 19th century, the Hamburg steak became popular on the menus of many restaurants in the port of New York. This kind of fillet was beef minced by hand, lightly salted and often smoked, and usually served raw in a dish along with onions and bread crumbs.[17][18] The oldest document that refers to the Hamburg steak is a Delmonico's Restaurant menu from 1873 which offered customers an 11-cent plate of Hamburg steak that had been developed by American chef Charles Ranhofer (1836–1899). This price was high for the time, twice the price of a simple fillet of beef steak.[16][19] By the end of the century the Hamburg steak was gaining popularity because of its ease of preparation decreasing cost. This is evident from its detailed description in some of the most popular cookbooks of the day.[8] Documents show that this preparation style was used by 1887 in some U.S. restaurants and was also used for feeding patients in hospitals; the Hamburg steak was served raw or lightly cooked and was accompanied by a raw egg

With such a ridiculously small step of placing a small Hamburg Steak on bread, it is doubtful we will ever find who actually invented the hamburger. For all we know, it was a Mongolian horse rider in Genghis Khan's army the first to have the idea!

Quote

Prior to the disputed introduction of the hamburger in the United States, similar foods already existed in the culinary tradition of Europe. The Apicius cookbook, a collection of ancient Roman recipes that may date to the early 4th century, details a preparation of beef called isicia omentata; served as a baked patty in which beef is mixed with pine kernels, black and green peppercorns, and white wine, isicia omentata may be the earliest precursor to the hamburger.[1] In the 12th century, the nomadic Mongols carried food made of several varieties of milk (kumis) and meat (horse or camel).

During the life of their leader Genghis Khan (1167–1227), the Mongol army occupied the western portions of the modern-day nations of Russia, Ukraine, and Kazakhstan,[3] forming the so-called Golden Horde. This cavalry dominated army was fast moving and sometimes unable to stop for a meal, so they often ate while riding. They wrapped a few slices of meat under their saddles so it would crumble under pressure and motion and be cooked by heat and friction. This recipe for minced meat spread throughout the Mongol Empire until its split in the 1240s.[4] It was common for Mongol armies to follow different groups of animals (such as herds of horses or oxen or flocks of sheep) that provided the necessary protein for the warriors' diets.[2] Marco Polo also recorded descriptions of the culinary customs of the Mongol warriors, indicating that the flesh of a single pony could provide one day's sustenance for 100 warriors.

The original Steak Tartare?  Roll Eyes

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steak_tartare

Quote
Potential link with the Tatars[edit]
The idea of eating minced and/or raw meat was popularized in Slavic regions, associated with Mongol encroachment. They and their turkic allies the Tatars were known collectively as being from Tartary, which was essentially Mongolia, though the name was a conflation of Tatar with the Greek stories of Tartarus. They had a tradition of finely mincing very tough meats like horse and camel, to make them edible, then binding the meat with milk or eggs.[4] Europeans told stories of this being made by placing the meat under a saddle to ride upon it until tender. It is possible that this story was confusion originating in the use of thin slices of meat to protect saddle sores from further rubbing.[5] Either way, minced and/or raw beef became associated with Tartary, and minced raw meat was introduced to Moscow by the Golden Horde.

While I abhorr the idea of cooking meat by way of sitting on it at full gallop, I do like the idea of a Mongolian Hamburger Tartare or at least Mongolian Hamburger with Tartar Sauce  Cheesy  Cheesy "The Genghis Khan Burger"
« Last Edit: April 17, 2019, 10:19:09 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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