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Author Topic: Help with glues for Styrene here in the UK  (Read 539 times)
Warlockab
Swab

United Kingdom United Kingdom


« on: April 01, 2019, 05:34:36 pm »

Hello,

I am building a project using a material thats fairly new to me, Styrene.
I have made a large cone from 3mm styrene board, which is about 40cm in diameter.
My issue is joining the seams solidly.

I have bought EMA Plastic Weld from Amazon, [EMA Plastic Weld Glue Cement Glue For Hard To Stick Plastics Weald].
I have also tried Super Glue and a few other obvious ones, none of which seem to have bonding strength I need to fix the joint.

I was wondering if there is anyone out there who might be able to point me to something I can use that might work?
I am in the U.K. so, I am sometimes limited in the brands that I can find in shops or online.

thanks in advance for anyone able to help.

Warlockab
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2019, 11:48:46 pm »

Hello,

I am building a project using a material thats fairly new to me, Styrene.
I have made a large cone from 3mm styrene board, which is about 40cm in diameter.
My issue is joining the seams solidly.

I have bought EMA Plastic Weld from Amazon, [EMA Plastic Weld Glue Cement Glue For Hard To Stick Plastics Weald].
I have also tried Super Glue and a few other obvious ones, none of which seem to have bonding strength I need to fix the joint.

I was wondering if there is anyone out there who might be able to point me to something I can use that might work?
I am in the U.K. so, I am sometimes limited in the brands that I can find in shops or online.

thanks in advance for anyone able to help.

Warlockab


What you're calling Styrene Board in the UK, seems to me to be what we call Polystyrene foam in the US (otherwise incorrectly known as "Styrofoam" in beverage cups and fast food containers). If on the other hand if I'm wrong on the nomenclature, and the Styrene material is more solid (example, thin-transparent, white and black sheets used for modeling at Hobby Shops) then the material in any case still belongs to the Polystyrene family of plastics, which is the same plastic (believe it or not) as CD/DVD jewel cases, disposable razors, and plastic model kits. The "Styrofoam" proper is another brand of extruded dense plastic foam (usually blue in colour) that is used for architectural insulation and is propietary to Dow Chemicals - not the same as the white expanded Polystyrene foam material used for plastic cups. They are all Polysterene, however.



If the crystal form of the plastic is soluble with plastic model cement, then it stands to reason that plastic model glue (eg Testors) might work the same on the foam. However, the biggst problem you have is not the strength of the bond but the weakness of the material itself. It may simply break along the bonded joint...
« Last Edit: April 01, 2019, 11:56:46 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Synistor 303
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Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2019, 03:53:37 am »

I have used a spray-on tacky glue that will stick foam and styrene down here in Australia. Look in the craft/glue section of your local craft shop and read the labels. The tacky stuff sticks foam and makes a soft join. Once dry you can't pull it apart. It works the same on styrene.
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Warlockab
Swab

United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2019, 12:10:29 pm »

Right, Super Glue seems to have worked on the Styrene....

My plan now, is to seal the edges with the EMA Plastic Weld, to hopefully strengthen the bond...

Thanks a lot for the responses

Warlockab Cool
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Lord Pentecost
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



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« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2019, 08:25:57 pm »

I have found EMA Plastic Weld to be fairly average, the plastic glue from Games Workshop is better, same stuff in theory but seems to work better.
Sanding then a thin layer of Araldite (or equivalent epoxy) is also an option. DON'T use contact adhesive it melts and deforms a lot of plastics.
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Herr Döktor
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« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2019, 02:01:51 pm »

Tamiya's thin liquid cement is very good, and I can also recommend Deluxe Materials Plastic Magic:

https://deluxematerials.co.uk/collections/special-adhesives-for-foam-plastic/products/plastic-magic-10-sec-cement
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Anselmofanzero
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Germany Germany


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« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2019, 06:01:02 pm »

Wow, so many different names? Polystyrene, white sheets...from 0.5 to 20mm. StyroFOAM, big white bubbles/balls and then Styrodur, tiny air bubbles, bit denser and more sturdy than styrofoam.
Thats how we call it in Germany. Old name for Polystyrene is Polystyrol I should add.
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Athanor
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Canada Canada


Keep them off-balance and brazen it out!


« Reply #7 on: June 06, 2019, 04:33:28 am »

Plastic model cement is essentially methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), probably with some additives, but the exact composition seems to be a closely guarded proprietary secret, depending on the manufacturer. However, I've had excellent results using the primer intended for joining PVC water pipe, which according to the label consists of a mixture of methyl ethyl ketone and acetone; again, the exact composition seems to be a trade secret. It does as good a bonding job as any proprietary model cement I've ever used, it's much cheaper, and is usually available in any half-decent hardware store or plumbing supplies store.

Both MEK and acetone are toxic and highly inflammable, so should only be used in a well ventilated space. Try not to breathe the fumes!

I hope this information helps,

Athanor

« Last Edit: June 06, 2019, 04:35:24 am by Athanor » Logged

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Lancelot C Flange
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« Reply #8 on: June 07, 2019, 12:28:07 pm »

 
 There will be a lot of force trying to uncurl the 3mm styrene. The EMA liguid cement will work, but you will need to clamp the work for a while until
the joint sets.

 The EMA effectively melts the contact sides of the styrene and clamping them together forms the bond as the melted faces join (weld), it's not a glue like superglue that holds the two faces together with sticking force.

The active ingredient in EMA is Dichloromethane. Years past we used to use Chloroform to stick Perspex, styrene etc... which was better but left a yellow
hue to the plastic. Dichlo isn't as good, it takes more to melt and longer but anyone can buy it and is safer-ish, unlike Chloroform.

Superglue has it's place and I would maybe use this to tack the work as the EMA does its thing, but be patient and let the joint harden before removing the clamps

Happy jointing.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #9 on: June 07, 2019, 07:50:52 pm »

Ha, ha. Quote of the day  Grin

Happy jointing.
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