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Author Topic: Arts and Crafts  (Read 6373 times)
rovingjack
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« Reply #50 on: October 06, 2019, 05:09:32 am »

last food experiment for a while. haven't quite cracked it, mainly struggling with thickening, but I introduce the Cucumber Melon Pie.

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RJBowman
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« Reply #51 on: October 06, 2019, 05:25:04 pm »

last food experiment for a while. haven't quite cracked it, mainly struggling with thickening, but I introduce the Cucumber Melon Pie.




You are filling those with cucumber? You could be filling them with chocolate custard, or fruit, or jelly, or tomatoes and mozzarella.
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rovingjack
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« Reply #52 on: October 06, 2019, 05:37:05 pm »

they are already filled with cooked cucumber and honeydew melon and they are quite tasty.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #53 on: October 06, 2019, 10:09:11 pm »

I don't see anything wrong with cucumber. In fact, why not cross from sweet into savory seasonal flavours such as squash? Courgette aka zucchini in a savoury sauce, for example.

There are some ingredients which would probably be very difficult to get anywhere in the USA (unless you grow your own vegetables), like the Zucchini flower, which is edible and has a deep black-peppery taste, making the most delectable stews you've ever had. Zucchini flower quesadillas and empanadas are my all time favourite.
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rovingjack
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« Reply #54 on: March 01, 2020, 10:13:43 pm »



I made a thing again. I used flour tortillas to make french toast, and then used cinnamon and apple hard candies to make an apple cinnamon syrup for them.

Dang tasty.
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« Reply #55 on: March 02, 2020, 02:53:30 am »



I made a thing again. I used flour tortillas to make french toast, and then used cinnamon and apple hard candies to make an apple cinnamon syrup for them.

Dang tasty.


I can see that working out pretty well.

Without the egg, that's called Buñuelos in Mexico. Technically Buñuelos refers to any kind of fried sweet bread (it can even look like a cake donut holes or hush puppies, depending on which Spanish speaking country you're talking about, as long as they're fried in oil) . But thin wheat flour fritters with syrup are typical Mexican Buñuelos.
« Last Edit: March 02, 2020, 02:57:09 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
MWBailey
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« Reply #56 on: March 05, 2020, 10:58:39 pm »



I made a thing again. I used flour tortillas to make french toast, and then used cinnamon and apple hard candies to make an apple cinnamon syrup for them.

Dang tasty.






Absoltely delectable!

My pancreas is doing somersaults...
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« Reply #57 on: March 06, 2020, 10:10:46 pm »



I made a thing again. I used flour tortillas to make french toast, and then used cinnamon and apple hard candies to make an apple cinnamon syrup for them.

Dang tasty.


Absoltely delectable!

My pancreas is doing somersaults...


Just go for it. If that doesn't get you the virus will! I'd rather go happy...
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Deimos
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« Reply #58 on: March 06, 2020, 10:32:17 pm »

SNIP

Without the egg, that's called Buñuelos in Mexico. Technically Buñuelos refers to any kind of fried sweet bread (it can even look like a cake donut holes or hush puppies, depending on which Spanish speaking country you're talking about, as long as they're fried in oil) . But thin wheat flour fritters with syrup are typical Mexican Buñuelos.

I buy buñuelos that are dusted with cinnamon and sugar. Yummy with tea.   Smiley
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« Reply #59 on: March 11, 2020, 11:41:42 am »

I made some simple crafty things...







Soon I shall get onto something more complex...
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MWBailey
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« Reply #60 on: April 01, 2020, 03:06:44 am »

I'm pretty sure root beer is what we call ginger beer, Banfili.
Oh no, nothing like ginger beer! The main flavours in root beer are sassafras root, sasparilla, vanilla and wintergreen. In the UK (and possibly Australia) wintergreen is best known as the smell of  Germolene, a cream you rub on sprained muscles, so most folk don't consider root beer drinkable (all the more for me  Grin ).

In the UK the most commonly available root beer is Bundaberg brand from Australia - a root beer that tastes overwhelmingly of licorice and as such is not proper root beer but pure, undiluted evil in a bottle.





So, it's a kind of sasparilla - which I have tried and loathed!
"pure, undiluted evil in a bottle" (non-alcoholic, of course!) is my kind of drink. Ice cold fresh orange juice, 50/50 with ice cold ginger beer is my ideal summer drink - bliss! Although a lime spider or ginger beer spider are close seconds!

Root Beer is almost universally reviled by people who have it for the first time. Oddly, it is strangely addictive and it will grow on most people very quickly, especially in hot climates where you have a chance to drink it ice cold. Every now and then I crave the strange taste of Root Beer which pairs well with vanilla ice cream. I'd definitely categorize the flavor as a relative of licorice. It's  dark colored like a Cola and stronger that a Cola, definitely, and so I only pair it with strong tasting foods such as smoked pork, sausage and pizza. Otherwise the root beer disables your taste buds.




As I understand it, according to my readings on the topic of several decades ago, as well as a recent episode of Townsends on Youtube, Ginger Beer and what we Americans call Root Beer, while incorporating different combinations of ingredients, could both be called "root beer," simply because both, in at least theior original recipes, call for what ios basically a strong tea-like infusion of rootstock along with the rest of teh recipe. Both are ideally set aside to achieve near-fermentation to the point of the development of gasification, but just short of the formation of alcohol within the mixture. Both are apt to explode unde rthe coinditions usually found in the DIY variety of the brewing plant, be it in the garage, basement, or the back of a pantry or closet.

There's also a third kind iof the stuff, brewed form birch roots. I used to enjoy a bottle of same every once in a while, until the local supermarket stopped carrying it. An acquired taste (given that it tasted kind of like somebody accidentally dumped a pint of turpentine into a million gallon vat of teh stuff somewhere along the way), much like drinking very strong black tea with a shot of maple sugar. (and yes, I'm one of those strong, unsweetened iced tea types).
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Synistor 303
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« Reply #61 on: April 01, 2020, 04:42:05 am »

The only iced tea I drink is Long Island Iced Tea...
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Sir Henry
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« Reply #62 on: April 01, 2020, 08:49:23 am »

I’m planning on moving to Sheffield once this hoohah is over and have decided to do a project is a sort of ‘thank you’ to the folks of Leeds Hackspace who have taught me so much since I joined 5 years ago. From furniture-making to soldering, designing roof gardens with automatic watering systems to designing and building escape rooms, building a new hackspace to public speaking, it’s been a hell of a few years. And so I'm making a book/puzzle game which is a collection of pictures, laser cut from plywood, based on various things made in that time.

Rather than fill the page with images , I’ll just put in links to the pics instead.

Mostly. Here are the front and back pages, then I’ll hide the rest:

Ironically the stars in the one on the right that aren't lit up already have LEDs behind them.

And here are the front and back of the box that the book will live in (the back is a riddle that gives the 3 digit code for the padlock you need to open to get to it). The designs are from a celtic art clip art collection I made half a lifetime ago that took months to draw and made no money at all. But suddenly, with access to a laser cutter it had a purpose. And the feeling you get when something you drew 30 years ago becomes real and tangible, using a technology that barely existed when you drew them, is amazing.

The first thing I did when I joined was make a model of the perpetual motion machine painting that the university here has (building it proved that the original maker never thought it could work but used it to scam money from people). If you're interested, there's a lecture about it here:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xLKlktYsOnU

Building escape rooms and all the props was fun to start with but when the deadline changed from 3 months to 3 weeks it became a nightmare. I discovered some interesting locking mechanisms and got to use some of the islamic geometric clip art I created years ago (solution here)

The D&D table was a huge power drain, with usb ports for each player, a map projector under the centre and LED strips along each player’s space to add animation to their fireballs, poison gasses and drowning. But the players love it.

The buildings across the tops of various pages are from a frieze we made of various (mostly science fiction) buildings as an exercise to learn how to program LEDs (still not quite finished that one...).

And then there was the series of designs on wood paneling that look gorgeous, if I may say so myself. I’m hoping to use them to convince the visitor centre on Lindisfarne to pay me to decorate the place with panels using designs from the Book of Lindisfarne. Another dream job that will turn into a nightmare, probably.
But then, as this Cerebus cover puts it :

My favourite though is the pangolin I designed for a friend. In the book you need to rotate it to open the next page but need a magnet from earlier in the book to do so. This image has turned into a bit of a mixed message with covid19 in that the pangolin is the most likely original vector for transmitting it to humans while the rainbow is being used to symbolise the hope that we will all survive it.

eta: I hope that filled up a bit of your empty time enjoyably; it did mine. Thanks and stay well.


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Banfili
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« Reply #63 on: April 01, 2020, 10:39:27 am »

Lovely work, Sir Henry!
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Athanor
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« Reply #64 on: April 02, 2020, 07:23:14 pm »

I'm pretty sure root beer is what we call ginger beer, Banfili.
Oh no, nothing like ginger beer! The main flavours in root beer are sassafras root, sasparilla, vanilla and wintergreen. In the UK (and possibly Australia) wintergreen is best known as the smell of  Germolene, a cream you rub on sprained muscles, so most folk don't consider root beer drinkable (all the more for me  Grin ).

In the UK the most commonly available root beer is Bundaberg brand from Australia - a root beer that tastes overwhelmingly of licorice and as such is not proper root beer but pure, undiluted evil in a bottle.






So, it's a kind of sasparilla - which I have tried and loathed!
"pure, undiluted evil in a bottle" (non-alcoholic, of course!) is my kind of drink. Ice cold fresh orange juice, 50/50 with ice cold ginger beer is my ideal summer drink - bliss! Although a lime spider or ginger beer spider are close seconds!


Root Beer is almost universally reviled by people who have it for the first time. Oddly, it is strangely addictive and it will grow on most people very quickly, especially in hot climates where you have a chance to drink it ice cold. Every now and then I crave the strange taste of Root Beer which pairs well with vanilla ice cream. I'd definitely categorize the flavor as a relative of licorice. It's  dark colored like a Cola and stronger that a Cola, definitely, and so I only pair it with strong tasting foods such as smoked pork, sausage and pizza. Otherwise the root beer disables your taste buds.





As I understand it, according to my readings on the topic of several decades ago, as well as a recent episode of Townsends on Youtube, Ginger Beer and what we Americans call Root Beer, while incorporating different combinations of ingredients, could both be called "root beer," simply because both, in at least theior original recipes, call for what ios basically a strong tea-like infusion of rootstock along with the rest of teh recipe. Both are ideally set aside to achieve near-fermentation to the point of the development of gasification, but just short of the formation of alcohol within the mixture. Both are apt to explode unde rthe coinditions usually found in the DIY variety of the brewing plant, be it in the garage, basement, or the back of a pantry or closet.

There's also a third kind iof the stuff, brewed form birch roots. I used to enjoy a bottle of same every once in a while, until the local supermarket stopped carrying it. An acquired taste (given that it tasted kind of like somebody accidentally dumped a pint of turpentine into a million gallon vat of teh stuff somewhere along the way), much like drinking very strong black tea with a shot of maple sugar. (and yes, I'm one of those strong, unsweetened iced tea types).


I would suggest that the British drink closest to root beer is dandelion and burdock.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dandelion_and_burdock

Athanor
« Last Edit: April 02, 2020, 07:24:54 pm by Athanor » Logged

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rovingjack
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« Reply #65 on: April 02, 2020, 10:20:31 pm »

unless they are doing something different that I don't know about, birch beer is not the root so much. Many people don't know you can tap birch trees like you can maple trees and cook down the sap to make birch syrup. It is not as common because you need waaay more sap for the same amount of syrup. But the taste is distinct enough from maple to have dedicated fans.

You can drink the sap direct but it doesn't last long before going off so processing it to a syrup has to be done quite quickly too.

The flavor is completely different from a rootbeer, the flavor chemistry is different as well as the sugars in them being very different. Birch syrup has a sugar profile very similar to honey and white grape, but tastes have been described variously like wildflower honey, molasses, some even suggesting a smokey or Umami flavor, with a hint of 'spiciness'. I'm not sure about all that, but it is distinctively it's own flavor.
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MWBailey
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rtafStElmo
« Reply #66 on: April 03, 2020, 06:00:04 am »

unless they are doing something different that I don't know about, birch beer is not the root so much. Many people don't know you can tap birch trees like you can maple trees and cook down the sap to make birch syrup. It is not as common because you need waaay more sap for the same amount of syrup. But the taste is distinct enough from maple to have dedicated fans.

You can drink the sap direct but it doesn't last long before going off so processing it to a syrup has to be done quite quickly too.

The flavor is completely different from a rootbeer, the flavor chemistry is different as well as the sugars in them being very different. Birch syrup has a sugar profile very similar to honey and white grape, but tastes have been described variously like wildflower honey, molasses, some even suggesting a smokey or Umami flavor, with a hint of 'spiciness'. I'm not sure about all that, but it is distinctively it's own flavor.




Looked it up, and yes you're right, but the bottle always said it was made from the roots (maybe that's why the store stopped carrying the stuff?). Lately I seem to be muddling all sorts of things, though. *Sigh*
« Last Edit: April 03, 2020, 06:02:30 am by MWBailey » Logged
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