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Author Topic: A random rant  (Read 2879 times)
Whitapers
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« on: January 16, 2019, 04:06:35 pm »

Winters are terrible. You can't go out, do anything fun, and it's just generally very boring. The best possible thing is to sit in your room, have a cup of coffee and blast rock music through your headphones. Come to think about it, it's pretty similar in Summers but I guess Summers just have a less gloomy vibe.
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von Corax
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« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2019, 08:04:50 pm »

You guys don't get much snow over there, do you? That would suck.
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Banfili
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« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2019, 09:41:42 pm »

I would take winter over summer any day! Week after week of 40+oC daytime temps with no relief at night is truly horrible! You can go out & do stuff in the winter time without risking sunstroke, heatstroke, or being burnt to a crisp, or all three once!
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Cora Courcelle
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« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2019, 10:33:58 pm »

Winter is full of things to do both inside and out, as is summer! 
Of course, one is required to make some sort of effort ...

Usually we don't get extremes of temperature in either direction - which is probably just as well as things tend to grind to a halt with a relatively minor variation to our norm  Smiley (much to the amusement of those in other lands).
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« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2019, 12:00:32 am »

The best places in the world are those where you have a large variation of weather in a small space, geographically speaking.

In San Diego County in California, roughly a 67 mile X 67 mile square of land, you have the edge of the American Southwest desert separated from the coast by a mountain range with some peaks at 6000 ft (1828 m) in altitude. Assuming you have enough time, in winter you may start your morning by driving a buggy in the hot (35 C) plains of Anza Borrego Park, like Mad Max, spend your mid-day in cold weather (Winter) setting off from the town of Alpine to Viejas Mountain, and when you get tired of that, shed your winter attire and go see the sunset at Pacific Beach in San Diego at 22C in the evening!


Pacific Beach, San Diego, California


Cuyamaca Peak, San Diego County ~ 1800 m



Anza Borrego Desert Park, San Diego County, California


« Last Edit: January 17, 2019, 12:08:32 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Sorontar
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« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2019, 04:33:32 am »

Four seasons in one day? That's Melbourne for you. The forecast today is for 36 degrees Celsius and it's been raining. When the change arrives tomorrow, I am expecting the temperature to drop over 10 degrees in one hour.

I like the weather cool or hot. It is those from places like Queensland who have the same temperature all year round that I think would have trouble adjusting easily to variable and seasonal weather.

Of course, when on the Moon or Mars, the temperature variety is even larger but the locals are genetically developed to cope with that.
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« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2019, 08:33:46 am »

Four seasons in one day? That's Melbourne for you. The forecast today is for 36 degrees Celsius and it's been raining. When the change arrives tomorrow, I am expecting the temperature to drop over 10 degrees in one hour.

I like the weather cool or hot. It is those from places like Queensland who have the same temperature all year round that I think would have trouble adjusting easily to variable and seasonal weather.

Of course, when on the Moon or Mars, the temperature variety is even larger but the locals are genetically developed to cope with that.

We lived in a variety of places 'up north' where the temperature was pretty much the same all year round... People actually went nuts! The whole time we were there we dreamed of 'proper' weather where we got cold days and autumn days and spring days, and now we live in Melbourne! (where the weather is lovely, except when it is hot and muggy like now.) Seasonal weather takes very little adjustment.

As for being stuck indoors by winter weather - a few months of being stuck indoors because it's 40C+ outside would cure that. When you are cold you can put on another jumper and move about to get warm. When it is well over 100F clothing removal comes to a stop once their aren't any more clothes to remove, and moving around makes it worse...
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2019, 11:53:25 am »

Four seasons in one day? That's Melbourne for you. The forecast today is for 36 degrees Celsius and it's been raining. When the change arrives tomorrow, I am expecting the temperature to drop over 10 degrees in one hour.

I like the weather cool or hot. It is those from places like Queensland who have the same temperature all year round that I think would have trouble adjusting easily to variable and seasonal weather.

Of course, when on the Moon or Mars, the temperature variety is even larger but the locals are genetically developed to cope with that.

We lived in a variety of places 'up north' where the temperature was pretty much the same all year round... People actually went nuts! The whole time we were there we dreamed of 'proper' weather where we got cold days and autumn days and spring days, and now we live in Melbourne! (where the weather is lovely, except when it is hot and muggy like now.) Seasonal weather takes very little adjustment.

As for being stuck indoors by winter weather - a few months of being stuck indoors because it's 40C+ outside would cure that. When you are cold you can put on another jumper and move about to get warm. When it is well over 100F clothing removal comes to a stop once their aren't any more clothes to remove, and moving around makes it worse...

Exactly. I was lucky enough to live in San Diego for 7 years, and I'll say it's not like you're being forced to experience all seasons in one day (not unless your job involves running around the whole county). Quite the contrary, outside of the inconvenience of having to learn four temperatures in your weather forecast, the climate at any one of these locations is very stable, almost unnaturally so. By some inexplicable miracle of nature, the wind blowing from the desert collides with the cold breeze from the ocean (cold currents from Alaska means very cold water) and the balance is such you get nearly constant temperatures all year, which means about 20 Celsius at the beach, maybe 25 It 24/7. Nobody lives in the desert and population in the mountains is sparse due to a lack of potable water and services - everybody lives along the coast, similar to Perth.

But the lack of rain and seasons in California will drive you crazy. At some point after a few years, you'll long for cold weather during Christmas, or rain for even just a couple of days. Even Mexico City which has nearly perfect weather (high altitude and tropical latitude) experiences rain monsoons in summer, and at least a week or two of freezing in winter.

In contrast California is dry as a bone. Cities get guaranteed water supply from a few large rivers and outside city limits the norm is severe water restrictions and drought.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2019, 12:11:28 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
bicyclebuilder
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« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2019, 12:44:18 pm »

Here in the Netherlands, we seldom get snow on Christmas. Usually if we do get snow, it's in january/february for a few days.
Most of the time it's no more than a few cm's of the white stuff. Just enough to give traffic a national shutdown.
Us Dutch aren't prepaired for winter weather. It is not manditory to have winter tires during winter period, like our German neighbours have.
Our standard weather is rain or chance of rain. Only in the summer we get longer periods of sunshine, with a few showers. Maximum temperature is about 35C, but due to the sea air and the chances of rain, the humidity goes to 100%. Verry humid, sticky and hot.
Our national pastime conversation is always complaining about the weather.

Whenever it does freeze, we instantly contimplate on the 11-town-skate-tour. In the province of Groningen, there is a skate tour on natural ice, if the ice is thick enough. Every year there is a chance we can ride this tour, but the last time was in 1997.
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« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2019, 03:12:54 am »

For all Melbourne claims about its weird weather, it has been known to snow over Christmas very, very occasionally in the mountains [1] on the outskirts. The last summer snow over Christmas was in 2006.

Sorontar

[1] Aussies are happy to call a peak 633 metres above sea level a mountain. It is part of the Great Dividing Range that stretches from Victoria up to Queensland and is the third largest land-based range in the world.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2019, 03:15:29 am by Sorontar » Logged
Banfili
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« Reply #10 on: January 18, 2019, 09:57:53 am »

I can recall, as a teenager, the occasional Christmas celebrated with fire lit and bundled up in jumpers!
Even further back (not saying how far!) my younger brother's nappies (diapers) and my dad's overalls being frozen solid!
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Whitapers
Swab

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« Reply #11 on: January 18, 2019, 02:09:04 pm »

Four seasons and variations is really the best. Winters though, I don't like them, too gloomy, even as a friend stated above that you actually have to make effort to do stuff hahahah. And those from Australia really have it tough these days. I think it was around 36 degree C yester-night there.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #12 on: January 18, 2019, 11:06:48 pm »

Four seasons and variations is really the best. Winters though, I don't like them, too gloomy, even as a friend stated above that you actually have to make effort to do stuff hahahah. And those from Australia really have it tough these days. I think it was around 36 degree C yester-night there.

But Australians break the mold when it comes to temperatures in summer, I think at over 40C average, maybe 42 in "broad areas next week (BBC)? The American Southwest comes a close second with absolute maximum 43, in summer in populated areas like Texas (usually more like 38C at the peakof August here) .
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Banfili
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« Reply #13 on: January 19, 2019, 06:39:06 am »

Our "cool change" came in early yesterday afternoon - only 39oC!
Continuing today with 38 (so far!) and tomorrow 38 - next week back to low-to-mid 40s for most of the week! I really, really hate this!
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #14 on: January 19, 2019, 09:30:25 am »

For all Melbourne claims about its weird weather, it has been known to snow over Christmas very, very occasionally in the mountains [1] on the outskirts. The last summer snow over Christmas was in 2006.

Sorontar

[1] Aussies are happy to call a peak 633 metres above sea level a mountain. It is part of the Great Dividing Range that stretches from Victoria up to Queensland and is the third largest land-based range in the world.

Not an argument there, Australia has mountains. People forget that altitude is not the true measure of a mountain, but rather prominence, which is the distance from the base to the peak.

The prominence of Mount Kosciusko is equal to it's altitude at 2200m / 7300ft. In contrast the Popocatepetl Volcano has a prominence of 3000m / 9900ft but the base of the volcano is very high at 2400m on the Valley of Mexico, so the peak ends up at 5400m /17800ft. So basically it's like Popocatepetl is sitting on top Mount Kosciusko plus 200m. Or equivalently if Mexico City was built on top of Mount Kosciusko.


View of Mount Kosciuszko and the Etheridge Range from the headwaters of the Snowy River,
NSW, Australia
« Last Edit: January 19, 2019, 09:41:34 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Banfili
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« Reply #15 on: January 20, 2019, 12:23:08 am »

In an average winter, the Australian Great Dividing Range receives more snow than France - however, it is spread over a much, much larger area!

It is called the Great Dividing Range because it divides the Eastern coastal and generally much more continuously fertile land from the inland generally but not always less continuously fertile land - Great Dividing Range, also called Great Divide, Eastern Highlands, or Eastern Cordillera, is the main watershed of eastern Australia; it comprises a series of plateaus and low mountain ranges roughly paralleling the coasts of Queensland, New South Wales, and Victoria for 2,300 miles (3,700 km). It is the third longest land-based range in the world.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #16 on: January 23, 2019, 01:13:14 am »

A Northumbria University professor, Valentina Zharkova, is predicting that a magnetic sun cycle will result in lower solar emissions starting by 2020 and bottoming in the year 2030. According to the mathematical models, Zharkova thinks that temperatures will drop low enough to freeze the River Thames over winter. In the past such magnetic phenomena have led to "mini ice ages," the last of which was experienced in the mid 19th C (explaining perhaps why people would readily adapt to inhospitable places like Utah and Arizona, and tolerate the summer heat in Texas in the United States). But she cautions that her mathematical research cannot be used as proof that there will be a mini ice age this time around, not least because of global warming. She hopes the effect will be enough to buy humanity 30 more years before the "point of no return" in global warming...


https://news.sky.com/story/scientists-predict-mini-ice-age-could-hit-uk-by-2030-11186098
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Banfili
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« Reply #17 on: January 23, 2019, 01:33:07 am »

One can live in hope that professor Zharkova is right!
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #18 on: January 23, 2019, 01:42:07 am »

One can live in hope that professor Zharkova is right!


I hope so too. She claims a high degree of confidence on her magnetic models (over 97%?). I just hope we don't squander the opportunity. It seems humankind is feeling a bit... erm... suicidal lately?

~ ~ ~

Oh. I hadn't posted this video directly below. Talking about backyard weather changes, about 45 miles from Mexico City (a/k/a #CDMX in Twitter) you can climb above the safe level for humans to climb (approx 15000 ft) without oxygen. Popocatepetl is off limits as it still is an active volcano, but the Iztaccihuatl is still allowed (17000 ft)



This is the background geography:

View from the Southeast part of Mexico City (approx 45 mile radius):
Background from left to right: Iztacciuhualtl Volcano 17 kft, Popocatepetl Volcano 18 kft
Mid-ground centre: Ajusco Range, a volcanic dome 13kft
Foreground SE (QII) of Mexico City




Climbing the Iztaccihuatl over 17 000 ft / 5200 m, ~45 miles/72 km due SE from Mexico City
Popocatepetl is *active* so you're not allowed to climb it. Snow usually only appears in cooler months
but there is a glacier along the ridge of Ixtaccihuatl
Hiking the Third Tallest Mountain in Mexico!



And turning 90 degrees about same distance from #CDMX due SW is the Xinantecatl/Nevado de Toluca.
Climbing to volcano crater lakes, about 15000 ft, and using a drone for the views
Nevado de Toluca: A Volcano Covered in SNOW!? ☃️




Climbing these two is definitely in my bucket list!  Grin But realistically it looks like a grueling climb, mostly due to the steep climb, length of the trip and the high altititude effects. A Greg was complaining of headaches. As far as I know he is not trained for this - just very fit, physically. From what I know as an aeronautical engineer, anything above 15000 ft is not safe for the untrained human body for prolonged periods of time over 1/2 hr (only trained climbers insist on doing it that way!!).

Because of personal health issues (lung capacity due to premature birth) I would not even *try* the Iztaccihuatl without at least an oxygen concentrator, and even then I'd probably only do the Nevado with the concentrator.  The Xinantecatl/Nevado de Toluca looks much-much easier to climb and you don't go over 12000 ft if you go to the crater lakes, and maybe 15000 if you choose to go to the summit.
« Last Edit: January 23, 2019, 02:29:12 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
morozow
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« Reply #19 on: January 23, 2019, 01:55:02 pm »

Oh! small talk  on weather Smiley

Well, we have winter, bitter cold on Epiphany a bit late. Well, on the one hand, they frosts -20 Celsius at night. On the other hand, -20 is not -30. So, the usual winter frost.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #20 on: January 23, 2019, 11:22:10 pm »

Oh! small talk  on weather Smiley

Well, we have winter, bitter cold on Epiphany a bit late. Well, on the one hand, they frosts -20 Celsius at night. On the other hand, -20 is not -30. So, the usual winter frost.

The Russian Federation is very large. I'm sure you have a very wide range of weather types. I'm also sure you have a few places where temperature varies a lot (geographically small place with large temperature variation). You must have some interesting places to share with us!
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morozow
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« Reply #21 on: January 24, 2019, 01:28:22 am »

I live in Moscow. Average Russian climate. In some winters, there will be several days of -30 Celsius. I even remember those winters. It was a long time.  And the year before last, the snow crushed my greenhouse in the country. That's when I have great heat was ready to discuss the vicissitudes of klmatom.

Here to the East in the heart of Eurasia, there notorious -50 degrees Celsius. Sorry for the details, the fart's causing the frostbite on pants. I've seen funny photos.
But not many people live there.

To the South, the climate is milder. Especially on the black Sea coast, there is now +10. Palms.  
And spring in Sochi, can be pull off the focus that you described. In the morning to ski, and then go down from the mountains and swim in the Black sea.

And changeable weather, it is on the coast. Is the Baltic sea, St. Petersburg and Kaliningrad. There always need to be prepared to rain.

And Vladivostok, with its monsoons and cyclones. They especially fun in the winter. When the wind from the ocean brings rain that freezes on everything.

And as for climate change. New insects appear. They say in the suburbs saw Cicadas. But they have to be 300 kilometers to the South.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2019, 01:33:21 am by morozow » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #22 on: January 27, 2019, 05:33:39 pm »

-50C is so extreme. I was looking at a YouTube video from someone who lives in Winnipeg, Canada. That's where you will see the - 30 Celsius temperatures this winter.

Nothing so dramatic for us. Here in Texas we will start tomorrow morning at 0 Celsius (freezing/32F) and by 3pm it will be 23 Celsius (73F)! Still, I hate walking when it gets that way. It forces you to carry warm clothing, only to be sweating by the afternoon.
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morozow
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« Reply #23 on: January 27, 2019, 09:53:36 pm »

Yes, Canada is close in climate. Only good. Smiley

And we just snowfall. Not a record, but a good half of the monthly norm, in two days.

Snow is good, especially for me a gardener. In summer we have a dry climate. And melt water permeates the soil in spring.

And we have a joke of nature in Siberia. The spring on the rivers is breaking up of the ice. It's beautiful, you can look at it for a long time.

But in Siberia, most of the major rivers flow from South to North. In the South the river ice is already opened, there is a flood. And downstream still winter. It's freezing. Formed ice jams and floods all around. They are blown up and even bombed from planes. Only downstream is still winter.  This is entertainment.
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von Corax
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« Reply #24 on: January 27, 2019, 10:42:02 pm »

-50C is so extreme. I was looking at a YouTube video from someone who lives in Winnipeg, Canada. That's where you will see the - 30 Celsius temperatures this winter.
My sister used to live in Winterpeg. Occasionally it got too cold to light the propane barbecue. Propane boils at -42°C.
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