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Author Topic: Departed Cultural Icons - 2019  (Read 3961 times)
Siliconous Skumins
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Rogue Ætherlord
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« Reply #75 on: May 30, 2019, 06:35:10 am »

Edward Jones alias YouTuber aussie50, "Mad tinkerer, engineer and equipment repairman" who sadly took his own life this week. He had battled with depression on and off previously, but was seemingly in good spirits and coping well. Everything seemed "normal" and no indications he was having any issues, nobody had any clue this was on his mind.

R.I.P Ed. You will be sorely missed by the millions of people world wide who have watched your videos.


Front Load Washer Total Carnage - Washer goes Chain Chomp on me
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Cora Courcelle
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England England



« Reply #76 on: June 04, 2019, 09:52:23 pm »

Paul Darrow.
 RIP Avon, I waited for your single smile in every episode ...
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You have to tread a fine line between avant-garde surrealism and getting yourself sectioned...
Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
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Australia Australia



« Reply #77 on: June 05, 2019, 08:29:12 am »

Paul Darrow.
 RIP Avon, I waited for your single smile in every episode ...

Ah, Blake's 7 - especially the first series or two!
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Rockula
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Rogue Ætherlord
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Nothing beats a good hat.


« Reply #78 on: June 05, 2019, 11:19:39 am »

Roky Erickson.

You're gonna miss me......
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The legs have fallen off my Victorian Lady...
Mercury Wells
Rogue Ætherlord
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I insiste that you do call me WELLS. :)


« Reply #79 on: June 07, 2019, 03:38:56 am »

Grammy-winning musician Dr John dies at 77

Quote
Grammy-winning American singer Dr John has died at the age of 77 after suffering a heart attack.

The New Orleans-born musician died on Thursday, according to a message posted on his official Twitter account.

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame singer combined the genres of blues, pop, jazz, boogie woogie and rock and roll.

A statement said: "Towards the break of day June 6, iconic music legend Malcolm John Rebennack, Jr, known as Dr John, passed away of a heart attack."

It added: "The family thanks all whom shared his unique musical journey & requests privacy at this time. Memorial arrangements will be announced in due course."
(c) BBC '19
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Oh...my old war wound? I got that at The Battle of Dorking. Very nasty affair that was, I can tell you.

The Ministry of Tea respectfully advises you to drink one cup of tea day...for that +5 Moral Fibre stat.
Cora Courcelle
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« Reply #80 on: June 09, 2019, 09:13:10 pm »

Paul Darrow.
 RIP Avon, I waited for your single smile in every episode ...

Ah, Blake's 7 - especially the first series or two!

And not the last one (except for The Smile of course)
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Mercury Wells
Rogue Ætherlord
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I insiste that you do call me WELLS. :)


« Reply #81 on: June 15, 2019, 01:54:25 pm »

Director Franco Zeffirelli dies at 96, Italian media report.
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Banfili
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Australia Australia



« Reply #82 on: June 15, 2019, 04:35:45 pm »


End of an era!
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Banfili
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« Reply #83 on: June 22, 2019, 08:03:20 am »

Bill Collins (Mr Movies) 4 December 1934-19 June 2019
William Roderick Collins OAM was an Australian film critic and film historian, radio and television presenter, journalist, author and lecturer best known for presenting Hollywood films on television in Australia. He specialised in the Classical Hollywood cinema.

Obituary - Sydney Morning Herald:
In the decades before DVDs and downloads, Bill Collins introduced aging movie classics to millions of Australia's television viewers. In over three decades of hosting The Golden Years of Hollywood, he showed off an adoration for and encyclopedic knowledge of the cinema that was entertaining, even somewhat alarming.

"This man has never seen a bad film!" exclaimed a stunned British comedian, visiting Australia in 1990. The line was often used, but not strictly accurate. As a guest reviewer on SBS's The Movie Show in 1990, he proved he was capable of more cerebral critique than the loving appraisal he usually presented.

Tougher as well, as he scorned the Spielberg romance Always (which he considered "horrendous, such a terrible picture") with enough fervour to leave co-host Margaret Pomeranz startled, remarking, "Bill, such passion!" In 1977, he named the "dreadful" musical There's No Business Like Show Business (1954) the worst film ever made, though that was before such films as Look Who's Talking ("badly made, badly written and badly acted") and Steel Magnolias ("a total wank").
His often-parodied image as an obsessive, uncritical movie-lover, however, was easy to understand. In 1991, he described Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves as a "terrible picture" that "deserves every brickbat it gets". The previous night, however, he had given it a characteristically wordy and positive introduction to a cinema audience of 850. "With a lot of films I present," he said, "I don't want to say nasty things because I don't think nasty things are worth saying."
He clearly enjoyed the films he presented on television, from the 1936 Oscar-winner San Francisco (which "belongs in that select group of Hollywood movies … beyond the pale of criticism") to Gone with the Wind (despite noting in 1990 that "I've only seen it 25 times, unlike some people I know who've seen it 100 times").

Collins was actually a cineaste, with an eclectic love of cinema – admiring everything from Peter Greenaway's The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover (1989) to the Clint Eastwood western High Plains Drifter (1973). He called for a special cinema in Sydney to play exclusively European films, and professed his love for Australian films like Wake in Fright (1971), Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975) and Dad and Dave Come to Town (1938).

His preference, however, was clear: Hollywood classics. His personal top 10 (revealed in 1977) was comprised entirely of English-language films from the 1930s and 1940s, led by two movies from 1939: Gone with the Wind and The Wizard of Oz. "Filmmakers in those days knew how to tell a story on film," he said.

William Collins was born in Sydney on December 4, 1934, the only child of William Collins, a policeman, and his wife Rita (nee Miller), a teacher. He went to Sutherland Primary School and was immersed in culture, reading two books a day, writing a "first novel" at age 11. He hated sport, but learned music, became an opera buff and a Gershwin fan.

At age five, he saw his first movie at Sutherland Picture House: Naughty Marietta (1935), starring Jeanette MacDonald, whom he would regard as one of his favourite female stars, along with Joan Crawford, Bette Davis, Kay Francis and others. ("I find it hard to pin it down to just a handful.")

He was instantly smitten – not just by the "gorgeous, glamorous, always stunningly gowned" MacDonald, but by the art of cinema itself. At age six, he knew Davis' entire filmography of the time. At 10, he was choosing which W. Somerset Maugham books would make good movies (and in some cases, he was later proven correct).

Though he would skip arts lectures at university to watch movies, often three or four in a day, he still completed his BA thesis at the University of Sydney on a somewhat different topic: Australia's nineteenth-century postal service. This was followed, less surprisingly, by a master's degree on the role of film in education. Following this, he taught Latin and history at East Hills and Canterbury boys' high schools. While lecturing at Sydney Teacher's College, he didn't look or sound like a television star, but his enthusiasm was noticed by television talent-spotters.

Though he made his first television appearances on ABC's Roundabout in 1963 – the same time he started reviewing television films for TV Times magazine – he was given his own series, The Golden Years of Hollywood, on TCN-9 Sydney in September 1966, earning $40 an appearance. He thought he would do well to go for six months. Instead, it would move through all three networks (and later Foxtel) for another five decades. ..."
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