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Author Topic: Making the Case for Chthulhu  (Read 587 times)
J. Wilhelm
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« on: December 29, 2018, 05:40:31 pm »

"With five feeble senses we pretend to comprehend the boundlessly complex cosmos, yet other beings with wider, stronger, or different range of senses might not only see very differently the things we see, but might see and study whole worlds of matter, energy, and life which lie close at hand yet can never be detected with the senses we have."

“When the stars were right, They could plunge from world to world through the sky; but when the stars were wrong, They could not live.”


HP Lovecraft


Lisa Randall, Professor of Physics and Cosmology at Harvard University poses the following question: Can life made from dark matter co-exist with us in the Universe? And if so, can it interact with us? The first instinct is to dismiss such idea. After all, scientists have told us again and again, that at best dark matter can intect with us very weakly by way of gravity. Unless amounts of dark matter are found in cosmic proportions, the dark matter will be nearly invisible, like gravity waves.

http://cosmos.nautil.us/feature/134/does-dark-matter-harbor-life

But Dr. Randall argues that the scenario is rather unlikely, for it is wrong to assume that all dark matter is made of only one type of particle unable to interact with anything else other than by way of gravity. Scientists have not condidered the very simple possibility that although most dark matter doesn’t interact, a small fraction of it might, given the number and complexity of particles in the Standard Model Pantheon of particle physics.  The Standard Model, she argues, contains six types of quarks, three types of charged leptons (including the electron), three species of neutrinos, all the particles responsible for forces, as well as the newly discovered Higgs boson.



From her perspective, given the complexity of the Standard Model, it is possible that a small numer of particles in that Pantheon might be interacting with one another, in ways that match the complex behaviour of the particles that make our own "conventional matter." There is no reason to assume, she concludes, that arrangements of dark matter, more complex than spherical blobs of gravity could not exist. If so, then it is theoretically possible that permutations of dark matter might be forming structures as complex as stars and galaxies. The dark matter, possibly only interacting by way of electrical charge, could collapse into disks similar to galaxies, and other shapes analogous to stars and planets.

These superstructures, could in turn, like regular matter, have corresponding microstructures, where the weak, strong and electromagnetic forces are more prominent than the gravitational force, which is a very long range force, but a very weak one simultaneosuly. Dr. Randall then follows the concept to it's logical conclusion: If you can have a complex dark matter chemistry, is it possible to have emergent dark matter life?

If so, what does it look like? How would be go about finding it? Obviously, since we have defined it as "dark," we are assuming that we can't interact with it, but that doesn't mean it's not here. Right under our noses, she says.

Food for thought... Given that HP Lovecraft's monsters are often made from a "different type of matter," which fades in and out of existence and does not normally interact with our type of matter, I couldn't help posting. After all, Lovecraft's descriptions seem a bit prophetic...

Make your case for Lord Chthulhu! There is more Lovecraftian physics out there as well! Funny comments welcome... this isn't a physics forum!



You have no idea how cute dark matter life could be—and you almost certainly never will.


« Last Edit: December 29, 2018, 07:11:36 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

von Corax
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« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2018, 06:21:20 pm »

It would be a spectentacular revelation if it could be proved.
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« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2018, 06:43:45 pm »

It would be a spectentacular revelation if it could be proved.

Indeed. One of the most intriguing questions I have is: at what scale woould these "dark galaxies" exist? The mention of an electromagnetic driven system of dark matter implies that the scale of everything would be different from our gravity-driven cosmos.  From what I understand, the most modern string theories would have as many as 15 dimensions, with all but the familiar 4 (x,y,z, time) "curled" into sub-atomic scales...

And let's not forget about Lovecraft's primitive understanding of "dimensions." Lovercarft was, due to financial and life circumstances, very much a self taught man. He tried, intensely, to understand the modern physics of the day, just after Albert Einstein and the younger generation of physicist's Quantum Mechanics.  Lovecraft's "Non-Euclidean Geometry," and the "hidden angles and dimensions" sound to me like a clear inspiration from the Lorentz' trasformation (adopted by Einstein from Dutch physicist Hendrik Lorentz, describing the universe as a 4 dimensional universe). There is a lot of material out there that makes Lovecraft's work interesting if you can survive his archaic overuse of the English language.
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« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2019, 08:33:44 am »

^Not to mention the constant xenophobia.

This is an interesting take, the similarities are certainly possibly there. The images rendered approximate dark matter do appear to have structure in them.
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