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Author Topic: Heavier-Than-Air Flight Without Moving Parts  (Read 369 times)
RJBowman
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« on: November 30, 2018, 08:05:39 pm »

A fascinating article:
https://www.inverse.com/article/51117-watch-mit-engineers-fly-first-ever-plane-with-no-moving-parts

The article is about an effort by an M.I.T. researcher to develop electrohydrodynamic propulsion; a system that uses electrical charges to move air, producing motion. This is not a new idea, but has mostly been considered impractical until recently.

The best part, the experimental model:



A glider not dissimilar to early 20th century airplanes, with a propulsion system made of grid of fine electrical wires which, to me, really has the same feel as early electrical apparatus. I could imagine, if a proper power supply had been possible, a plane like this being built in the pre-First-World-War era. The plane might have inspired fiction, i.e. "Tom Swift and his Electrohydrodynamic Flyer".

MOD NOTE: Fixed link
« Last Edit: December 01, 2018, 12:20:40 am by von Corax » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2018, 10:58:13 pm »

A fascinating article:


The article is about an effort by an M.I.T. researcher to develop electrohydrodynamic propulsion; a system that uses electrical charges to move air, producing motion. This is not a new idea, but has mostly been considered impractical until recently.

The best part, the experimental model:



A glider not dissimilar to early 20th century airplanes, with a propulsion system made of grid of fine electrical wires which, to me, really has the same feel as early electrical apparatus. I could imagine, if a proper power supply had been possible, a plane like this being built in the pre-First-World-War era. The plane might have inspired fiction, i.e. "Tom Swift and his Electrohydrodynamic Flyer".

It's fascinating and I never heard of it coming. Like Fletner rotor airplanes he idea works, it's just too far out there to have been considered practical. Low weight materials and computer design methods allow this.
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Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
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Australia Australia



« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2018, 11:47:18 pm »

Looks like something that could be printed on a 3D printer!
Saw a programme on tv recently of folks who are printing large scale metal rocket components on 3D printers -  Grin 3D printers!
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