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Author Topic: Respect for the Victorian ladies maid.  (Read 1016 times)
Cora Courcelle
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« on: September 13, 2018, 05:55:28 pm »

I usually make my own outfits, but there are such a lot of very pretty Victorian-style blouses in the shops at the moment, with ruffles, lace inserts, pintucks etc, mostly in fine cotton (which I love), that I have succumbed and bought several in different styles and colours recently.

After an ironing session that went on for far longer than I anticipated as I attempted to flatten all the previously mentioned ruffles, lace inserts and pintucks, all I can say is that I have the utmost respect for those Victorian ladies maids who managed to iron even more complicated garments with an iron that was heated by the fire, to an not particularly accurate temperature (no, I'm sorry "when water sizzles on it" is not the same as a gauge!).

They have my great admiration.

And whoever invented the modern iron has my unending gratitude!
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Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia



« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2018, 12:49:02 am »

When I finished up at work I decided "no more ironing!"
So now I only iron anything if if I am going to a wedding or a funeral! And even then I'm not too precise, as I have to travel some distance to either!
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Prof Marvel
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


learn from history, or be doomed to repeat it


« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2018, 06:03:17 am »

When I finished up at work I decided "no more ironing!"
So now I only iron anything if if I am going to a wedding or a funeral! And even then I'm not too precise, as I have to travel some distance to either!

I am a great fan of permanent press! I have some “special “  clothing that requires ironing but not to extent of Ms Courcelle !

If I recall correctly from my days as a blacksmith at historic Gibbs Farm (as a volunteer blacksmith ) the ladies of the house had little tricks for irons and wood fired baking stoves they picked up from grannies and books.
For example, initial sizzle is around boiling, or 212 F.  If a small length of newsprint curled but did not burn it was around 300 F. If it browned or singed it was above 400 F.

Yhs
Prof Marvel
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J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


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« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2018, 06:58:28 am »

That, ladies and gentlemen is why today we have dry cleaning shops!  Grin As they use steam presses and other steam powered devices (by way of a giant boiler in the house), they largely avoid the use or a flat iron, and finish much quicker!
« Last Edit: September 14, 2018, 07:00:44 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia



« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2018, 01:40:46 pm »

My closest dry cleaning agency is over 45 km away, and the nearest dry cleaner is around 65-70 km away. Dry cleaning, because of the chemicals, is only used as a last resort - if I absolutely have to I will iron. As I only wear natural fibres I steam iron. In the past 10 years I have ironed on three occasions!
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2018, 02:57:37 am »

I usually make my own outfits, but there are such a lot of very pretty Victorian-style blouses in the shops at the moment, with ruffles, lace inserts, pintucks etc, mostly in fine cotton (which I love), that I have succumbed and bought several in different styles and colours recently.

After an ironing session that went on for far longer than I anticipated as I attempted to flatten all the previously mentioned ruffles, lace inserts and pintucks, all I can say is that I have the utmost respect for those Victorian ladies maids who managed to iron even more complicated garments with an iron that was heated by the fire, to an not particularly accurate temperature (no, I'm sorry "when water sizzles on it" is not the same as a gauge!).

They have my great admiration.

And whoever invented the modern iron has my unending gratitude!


. Is New Romantic making a comeback.?   I shall  be  wary of treading on ants and being damned for eternity
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Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia



« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2018, 09:46:30 am »

I rather liked the 'New Romantic' look!
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Aloysius Raleigh
Swab

United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #7 on: December 16, 2018, 10:46:06 pm »

Smaller Irons!

Seriously, most modern irons have huge plates made to quickly press large, boring expanses of cotton. I end up just using the tip of the iron when there are tucks, gathers, etc.

Even dry-cleaners don't have the nous anymore. As far as I know there's only one cleaners left in the Whole United Kingdom with the correct machine for pressing gentlemen's collars. Try ironing a curling collar that's wet with starch and will brown if you overheat it....
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ForestB
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States

Lady of the copper frogs


« Reply #8 on: December 17, 2018, 07:36:41 am »

I don't know if folks in other places other than the U.S. have heard of these, but they make tiny irons for pressing little seams on quilting blocks. One of those might be good for pressing small tuck and such.
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frances
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #9 on: December 17, 2018, 11:37:04 pm »

Yes, there are little irons for quilting in the UK but they have not had a good press from users.  I use a travel iron when there are lots of flounces.
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Synistor 303
Officer
***
Australia Australia


Zenyna Ironbracker


« Reply #10 on: December 18, 2018, 08:41:32 am »

When I finished up at work I decided "no more ironing!"
So now I only iron anything if if I am going to a wedding or a funeral! And even then I'm not too precise, as I have to travel some distance to either!

My Grandfather claimed that all his daughters (8 in number) would burn to death if the house ever caught on fire, as they would be in a queue at the ironing board to iron something to put on to go outside.
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Mercury Wells
Rogue Ætherlord
*
I insiste that you do call me WELLS. :)


« Reply #11 on: December 27, 2018, 01:30:34 am »


Even dry-cleaners don't have the nous anymore. As far as I know there's only one cleaners left in the Whole United Kingdom with the correct machine for pressing gentlemen's collars. Try ironing a curling collar that's wet with starch and will brown if you overheat it....

If you wouldn't mind, could you please supply the name of this establishment?.
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