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Author Topic: When Major Airlines flew Amphibious Planes  (Read 1374 times)
RJBowman
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« on: July 21, 2018, 11:38:33 pm »

A web site I found:
http://www.clipperflyingboats.com

The web site is about the amphibious passenger planes of the 1920's and 1930's, which appear to have been quit luxurious; influenced by ships and Pullman train cars, and a predecessor to the luxury jumbo jets of the mid to late 20th century. Here's a cutaway drawing from an old advertisement:



I've always wondered what happened to amphibious plane travel; it seemed like it would get you closer to the business districts of most major cities and would save you on travel into the city from outlying airports.

Back in '94 I was in New York and saw a dock on the lower west side labeled as being for amphibious planes. Can anyone confirm if it is still there?
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Banfili
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Australia Australia



« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2018, 12:56:12 am »

There is still an amphibious plane base at Rose Bay on Sydney Harbour - poshed up terminal and all - but since the last boats to fly to Lord Howe Island ceased, no big sea planes fly out of it. It is set up to fly smaller scenic and tourist flights. But, amphibious planes still fly!
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Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2018, 01:06:17 am »

There is still an amphibious plane base at Rose Bay on Sydney Harbour - poshed up terminal and all - but since the last boats to fly to Lord Howe Island ceased, no big sea planes fly out of it. It is set up to fly smaller scenic and tourist flights. But, amphibious planes still fly!


 NZ and Aus were at the fore front of aviation in the early 1900s.  Due to being so far away  from the larger world populations and the need yo get people and products here at a more expedient pace . Ww2 changed all that
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2018, 01:07:23 am »

A web site I found:
http://www.clipperflyingboats.com

The web site is about the amphibious passenger planes of the 1920's and 1930's, which appear to have been quit luxurious; influenced by ships and Pullman train cars, and a predecessor to the luxury jumbo jets of the mid to late 20th century. Here's a cutaway drawing from an old advertisement:



I've always wondered what happened to amphibious plane travel; it seemed like it would get you closer to the business districts of most major cities and would save you on travel into the city from outlying airports.

Back in '94 I was in New York and saw a dock on the lower west side labeled as being for amphibious planes. Can anyone confirm if it is still there?


 Quicker more efficient air travel happened.  It became easier  to land and and lift off larger planes on land
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Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2018, 01:32:17 am »









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« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2018, 01:48:29 am »

There is still an amphibious plane base at Rose Bay on Sydney Harbour - poshed up terminal and all - but since the last boats to fly to Lord Howe Island ceased, no big sea planes fly out of it. It is set up to fly smaller scenic and tourist flights. But, amphibious planes still fly!


 NZ and Aus were at the fore front of aviation in the early 1900s.  Due to being so far away  from the larger world populations and the need yo get people and products here at a more expedient pace . Ww2 changed all that

I agree. WWII happened, and with it a revolution in aviation technology. Note how early jets came to be. The technology was developed pre WWII in Britain (centrifugal compressor) and Germany (axial compressor - what we use today)but it was WWII that accelerated their development. Jet fighters barely got to be flown on Britain Germany and the US- but the war ended too soon. This German and British learned by the Americans (swept wing, axial turbojet, design theory) progress translated to military tanker and bomber aircraft (Boeing B-52, 1952-1962), which turned out to be an attractive design for passenger carriers. By the late 1950s the four turbojet airliners, starting with the Boeing 707 (1958-1979) began to decimate the propeller aircraft, like the luxury Lockheed Constellation (aka "Connie" 1943-1958) propeller aircraft barely even got a chance to fly.

Quite simply progress was happening too fast. The last person to believe in large boat planes was Howard Hughes and his wooden H-4 Hercules "Spruce Goose (1947),which only made a brief test flight - but analysts showed that the design was sound, and it would fly.
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Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #6 on: July 22, 2018, 01:53:23 am »

  Vintage amphibious planes in Rose Bay  harbour and  various other locations in the Australian territories







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Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #7 on: July 22, 2018, 02:19:35 am »

There is still an amphibious plane base at Rose Bay on Sydney Harbour - poshed up terminal and all - but since the last boats to fly to Lord Howe Island ceased, no big sea planes fly out of it. It is set up to fly smaller scenic and tourist flights. But, amphibious planes still fly!


 NZ and Aus were at the fore front of aviation in the early 1900s.  Due to being so far away  from the larger world populations and the need yo get people and products here at a more expedient pace . Ww2 changed all that

I agree. WWII happened, and with it a revolution in aviation technology. Note how early jets came to be. The technology was developed pre WWII in Britain (centrifugal compressor) and Germany (axial compressor - what we use today)but it was WWII that accelerated their development. Jet fighters barely got to be flown on Britain Germany and the US- but the war ended too soon. This German and British learned by the Americans (swept wing, axial turbojet, design theory) progress translated to military tanker and bomber aircraft (Boeing B-52, 1952-1962), which turned out to be an attractive design for passenger carriers. By the late 1950s the four turbojet airliners, starting with the Boeing 707 (1958-1979) began to decimate the propeller aircraft, like the luxury Lockheed Constellation (aka "Connie" 1943-1958) propeller aircraft barely even got a chance to fly.

Quite simply progress was happening too fast. The last person to believe in large boat planes was Howard Hughes and his wooden H-4 Hercules "Spruce Goose (1947),which only made a brief test flight - but analysts showed that the design was sound, and it would fly.

 Potential Military use is behind all  major technology advances. It demonstrates the priority of governments and corportions.
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Banfili
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« Reply #8 on: July 22, 2018, 10:15:40 am »

I think I have a photograph somewhere of a WWII Catalina - in my late dad's small collection of wartime photos.
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Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #9 on: July 22, 2018, 04:07:09 pm »

I think I have a photograph somewhere of a WWII Catalina - in my late dad's small collection of wartime photos.

 There is amazing photos on line of th Catalina. You are lucky to have one of your own
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Wormster
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« Reply #10 on: July 22, 2018, 04:45:29 pm »

T'owd man and his mates went on one of the last flights of the B.O.A.C. Short Sandringham flying boat, (that now resides in the "Solent Sky" collection) from Southampton Water (dubbed "The World's First Airport) before the plane went into conservation.

Father in law before working on rockets was based at Saunders Roe works in Cowes around the time of the SR./A.1* form what I recall.

*
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HmSaWXHuPbw

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saunders-Roe_SR.A/1
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« Reply #11 on: September 24, 2018, 08:59:57 am »

Picky time -
Most of those pics are flying boats, few are amphibians. Amphibians had floats and wheels.
You've covered some big operators - Pan Am, QANTAS and British. The latter two operated what they called "C-Class" boats, relatives of the wartime Sunderland. TEAL (NZ) did too.
Last I remember, when I had relatives working in Papua-New Guinea ca the late 1950s-early 60s, was that part of their travels used Catalinas. TAA "Sunbird" had up to three, I think, at any given time, but used four in all. One or two of these began as amphibians but they ended up with wheels removed (they probably needed the hull space for passengers and cargo) to become boats. I believe the remainder of Sunbird's Cats were built purely as boats.
QANTAS also had DHC Otters in PNG, I think, which were floatplanes.
Somewhere in Australia there may still be a Cat amphibian someone made from an old Catalina, with tail and wings removed and boat-shaped hull and superstructure, but retracting wheels intact for towing. Also rumour has it that a Dornier flying boat, similarly converted, was somewhere on the River Murray as a houseboat.
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #12 on: September 24, 2018, 09:18:04 am »



 That's an interesting story.  The Islands in the Pacific, Australia and New Zealand were far flung destinations. It took money  and   feats of engineering to get here and to leave.  Which could why  the craft were left  there too. 
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Wormster
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« Reply #13 on: September 24, 2018, 09:51:28 am »

Twin Otter seaplanes are still in use these days, My cousin before he switched to rotary wing flew twins as an air taxi somewhere in the Pacific Ocean (may well have been somewhere as exotic as the Seychelles)
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #14 on: September 25, 2018, 08:20:45 am »

Twin Otter seaplanes are still in use these days, My cousin before he switched to rotary wing flew twins as an air taxi somewhere in the Pacific Ocean (may well have been somewhere as exotic as the Seychelles)

 That would  be  marvelous  employment opportunity
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