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Poll
Question: Are  mobile food vendors steampunk?
Steampunk - 2 (12.5%)
Dieselpunk - 4 (25%)
Entertaining Food Vendors - 5 (31.3%)
Pretentious and over priced - 2 (12.5%)
Best avoided for health reasons - 3 (18.8%)
Total Voters: 8

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Author Topic: Are Mobile Food trucks Steampunk?  (Read 5405 times)
Hurricane Annie
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« on: July 15, 2018, 09:09:47 am »


New Zealand is a bit behind the times, being so far beyond the Seven Seas.  Food trucks, mobile catering, coffee vans , call them what you will; have only started to take off in recent times.  There has always been hot dog trucks at  events, selling battered sausages and hot chips.  Now we are  being invited to try  mini taco, cup cakes, vegetable smoothies, pizza, exotic  noodles, game meat rolls and the like.

 My  curiosity led me to investigate  vans, trucks, scooters, carts of all types. Foods, beverages and  other merchandise. There is a whole wide world of catering  and  vending out there.  It's a fascinating journey.

 What  the experiences of fellow forum followers?
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2018, 09:15:07 am »


 Here are a few examples of modern Mobil food vending. " Food Truck"  doesn't quite cut it.

http://youtu.be/QnRRY7Rwofc

http://youtu.be/8HQEA6QvFes

http://youtu.be/3aR-aZ75xW0

http://youtu.be/KavKY3NbnEM
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2018, 09:31:37 am »







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James Harrison
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« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2018, 11:32:08 am »

They've a history in the UK going back at least as far as the Blitz, probably further back even than that considering they're a natural progression beyond the person with a basket. 

Not convinced that a Mr. Whippy icecream van could be, even by a vast stretch of imagination, be accepted as steampunk but there are some permutations of the breed thatI would argue lean that way.

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« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2018, 03:07:27 pm »

While I don't agree that the modern food carts we see in the street are Steampunk, I believe they could be Dieselpunk or more appropriately Atompunk, due to the fact that is when the world saw them first.

Having said that, the idea itself of a mobile food cart is much much older, probably dating back centuries into the mediaeval period if not much older. Simply because street food vendors have always existed.

As far as the Steampunk period is concerned, there was one notable case of a food cart that comes very close to the 20th century type :the Chuck Wagon :



« Last Edit: July 15, 2018, 03:19:20 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2018, 04:52:31 am »

While I don't agree that the modern food carts we see in the street are Steampunk, I believe they could be Dieselpunk or more appropriately Atompunk, due to the fact that is when the world saw them first.

Having said that, the idea itself of a mobile food cart is much much older, probably dating back centuries into the mediaeval period if not much older. Simply because street food vendors have always existed.

As far as the Steampunk period is concerned, there was one notable case of a food cart that comes very close to the 20th century type :the Chuck Wagon :





 Are you suggesting street vending is the oldest profession?  {it probably is}

 In NZ the leading frozen vege  company [ not that is has much competition] puts out  a corn, ampsicum, pea, celery and onion combo called "chuck wagon corn".  It's a handy go to  ingredient  for  so many meals.
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #6 on: July 16, 2018, 05:12:56 am »

 The various military services and red Cross had mobile  canteens in WW 2.   This is where the mobile food industry  adapted to  trucks. Definitively dieselpunk.






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Banfili
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« Reply #7 on: July 16, 2018, 04:06:01 pm »

That Velo Coffee cart gets my vote!
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Prof Marvel
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« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2018, 01:03:47 am »

Hmmmm ...

There has always been hot dog trucks at  events, selling battered sausages and hot chips. 

 battered sausages ?

Is there a "battered sausage" shelter for sausages that have been abused?

and hot chips...?

I get hot oily chips from the metal on my milling machine... is that the same thing?

ahh, but the food trucks....

I do believe that hawking food from a handbasket came first as Annie pointed out.

then came pedlars carts  in the square/market/alley/whatever: 1691 – New Amsterdam regulated street vendors selling food from push carts.

In the 1850’s – Dining cars begin feeding cross country train passengers.

as our good J Wilhelm pointed out,  Texas’ Charles Goodnight may have had  the first “food truck” with his "chuck wagon" in 1866

Then came the "lunch wagon" -- Walter Scott in 1872 cut windows in a covered wagon and parked it in front of a newspaper office in Providence, Rhode Island,
He sold sandwiches, pies and coffee to the news poaper employees.

In the1880sThomas H. Buckley, was manufacturing several types oflunch wagons in Worcester, Massachusetts.
models included the Owl, and the White House Cafe. Some features were sinks, ice boxes and  stoves.

in 1894  Sausage vendors set up wagons outside the student dorms at major eastern universities (Yale, Harvard, Princeton, and Cornell).
The carts became known as “dog wagons”

then came the mobile canteens....

so, yes, the earliest SHOULD be considered steamy!

take one such lunch wagon, add a steam driven tractor, and a dining car in the rear.... and bobs yer uncle...

yhs
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Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2018, 06:27:45 am »

That Velo Coffee cart gets my vote!


 On exploring the net, bike vending carts  are a popular option  for  selling everything from ice cream to beer







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Antipodean
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« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2018, 07:22:55 am »

OOOOOHH, I do like that last one. Very reminiscent of "The Prisoner"

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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #11 on: July 17, 2018, 10:05:14 am »

OOOOOHH, I do like that last one. Very reminiscent of "The Prisoner"




 If only he had just complied and took up a gentle occupation like street vending....
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« Reply #12 on: July 18, 2018, 04:23:39 pm »

Hmmmm ...

There has always been hot dog trucks at  events, selling battered sausages and hot chips.  

 battered sausages ?

Battered Sausages are sossies that have been dipped in batter, then deep fried.
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« Reply #13 on: July 19, 2018, 01:28:26 am »

May I also interject that non-wheeled food vendors existed as well? In the ancient Tenochtitlan a/k/a Mexico City food vending and transportation was done by the Aztec by means of "Chinampas," or shallow water canoes to traverse the swamps that surrounded the city. Today only a small part of the Lake of Texcoco remains, but the Chinampas still exist and are used in a similar manner.

Transportation of food by way of Chinampa, circa 1895, Mexico City



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Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #14 on: July 19, 2018, 05:11:26 pm »

Hmmmm ...

There has always been hot dog trucks at  events, selling battered sausages and hot chips.  

 battered sausages ?

Battered Sausages are sossies that have been dipped in batter, then deep fried.

 In NZ they get called "hot dogs"  for some  reason.  Though they are  battered sausages in a stick.  Horrible things. But they taste good
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Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #15 on: July 19, 2018, 05:13:47 pm »

May I also interject that non-wheeled food vendors existed as well? In the ancient Tenochtitlan a/k/a Mexico City food vending and transportation was done by the Aztec by means of "Chinampas," or shallow water canoes to traverse the swamps that surrounded the city. Today only a small part of the Lake of Texcoco remains, but the Chinampas still exist and are used in a similar manner.

Transportation of food by way of Chinampa, circa 1895, Mexico City




 In areas  covered with  river networks, waters ways  become road ways.  Boat vendors would have been a convenient concept
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Prof Marvel
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learn from history, or be doomed to repeat it


« Reply #16 on: July 20, 2018, 12:05:30 am »

Hmmmm ...

There has always been hot dog trucks at  events, selling battered sausages and hot chips.  

 battered sausages ?

Battered Sausages are sossies that have been dipped in batter, then deep fried.

 In NZ they get called "hot dogs"  for some  reason.  Though they are  battered sausages in a stick.  Horrible things. But they taste good

AHA!
the ubiquitous carneval/state fair food in the U.S. called "corn dogs"  .... omg even martha stuart!



yhs
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Banfili
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Australia Australia



« Reply #17 on: July 20, 2018, 12:21:35 am »

[battered sausages ? [/quote]

Battered Sausages are sossies that have been dipped in batter, then deep fried.
[/quote]

 In NZ they get called "hot dogs"  for some  reason.  Though they are  battered sausages in a stick.  Horrible things. But they taste good
[/quote]

In Australia, they are "battered saveloys" aka "battered savs", and are not sausages per se, nor hot dogs, but a red-skinned sausage-type thing, of indeterminate meat. They come in two sizes: large ones for battering, and smaller ones for use as party finger-food! I like them unbattered, dipped in tomato sauce, whatever size, and whatever they are made of!

Sausages as we know them are not wasted on battering - they are barbecued (and sold on a slice of bread with fried onions and sauce of choice, on Saturday mornings out the front of retail shops, as a fundraiser, or at sporting events. Either way, I like them, too, and if I don't have any at home will occasionally make the trek to town for a sausage or two - the events for which they are sold are called "sausage sizzles", and raise fantastic amounts of money for the various causes for which they give their little sausage lives! Grin
[/quote]
« Last Edit: July 20, 2018, 12:28:08 am by Banfili » Logged
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« Reply #18 on: July 20, 2018, 01:02:54 am »

I can't say that I'm a fan of the American corndog, though I don't dislike them.

Being in Texas, sausages are aplenty and a bit of a science due to the German/Czech roots -

The typical cheap corndog encases an American style "Wiener" which is nothing more than a downsized and more processed variation of Italian Mortadella (a/k/a "Bologna" is the US) or Austrian Frankfurter Würstl (Vienese sausage), made with a combination of chicken and beef.  It's the cornmeal that makes the American Corn Dog taste good, otherwise it's ho-hum (not to be confused with the American "Vienna sausage" which although it is a derivative, is made as a softer much smaller link used as cocktail meat).

The New Zealand Hot Dog/ British battered Sausage,  - I don't know, sounds like the Brit sausage is similar to Bratwurst which is chopped pork and very greasy already, so dipping them in batter and deep frying them seems... too much - sort of like deep fried (striped) bacon, which we also have.

In my opinion beef sausages (reddish meat) are a bit better, tastier, for those types of applications, but admittedly are very salty. Known as Frankfurter Rindswurst in the 19th. C in Germany, the Frankfurters (or Franks as what we call them in the US), and are what people in New York use for their (American) Hot Dogs and are popular with the Jewish population (no pork).
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Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #19 on: July 20, 2018, 06:14:51 am »

[battered sausages ?

Battered Sausages are sossies that have been dipped in batter, then deep fried.
[/quote]

 In NZ they get called "hot dogs"  for some  reason.  Though they are  battered sausages in a stick.  Horrible things. But they taste good
[/quote]

In Australia, they are "battered saveloys" aka "battered savs", and are not sausages per se, nor hot dogs, but a red-skinned sausage-type thing, of indeterminate meat. They come in two sizes: large ones for battering, and smaller ones for use as party finger-food! I like them unbattered, dipped in tomato sauce, whatever size, and whatever they are made of!

Sausages as we know them are not wasted on battering - they are barbecued (and sold on a slice of bread with fried onions and sauce of choice, on Saturday mornings out the front of retail shops, as a fundraiser, or at sporting events. Either way, I like them, too, and if I don't have any at home will occasionally make the trek to town for a sausage or two - the events for which they are sold are called "sausage sizzles", and raise fantastic amounts of money for the various causes for which they give their little sausage lives! Grin
[/quote]
[/quote]

 We have the same fund raising   fare, in NZ, aka sausage sizzles.  Savaloys are usually eaten boiled. The little ones are called cheerio aka little boys. Many happy memories of children's parties with cheerios in a tomato sause dip.
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #20 on: July 20, 2018, 07:06:02 am »

I can't say that I'm a fan of the American corndog, though I don't dislike them.

Being in Texas, sausages are aplenty and a bit of a science due to the German/Czech roots -

The typical cheap corndog encases an American style "Wiener" which is nothing more than a downsized and more processed variation of Italian Mortadella (a/k/a "Bologna" is the US) or Austrian Frankfurter Würstl (Vienese sausage), made with a combination of chicken and beef.  It's the cornmeal that makes the American Corn Dog taste good, otherwise it's ho-hum (not to be confused with the American "Vienna sausage" which although it is a derivative, is made as a softer much smaller link used as cocktail meat).

The New Zealand Hot Dog/ British battered Sausage,  - I don't know, sounds like the Brit sausage is similar to Bratwurst which is chopped pork and very greasy already, so dipping them in batter and deep frying them seems... too much - sort of like deep fried (striped) bacon, which we also have.

In my opinion beef sausages (reddish meat) are a bit better, tastier, for those types of applications, but admittedly are very salty. Known as Frankfurter Rindswurst in the 19th. C in Germany, the Frankfurters (or Franks as what we call them in the US), and are what people in New York use for their (American) Hot Dogs and are popular with the Jewish population (no pork).

Most sausages sold here are  of  the processed  pre cooked style.  They and the uncooked version are usually a mix of meats  with  some  having more beef or more pork and on a good day, lamb .  Occasionally there are venison or cheval sausages. Chicken sausages are a new  product.  The few independent butchers left    sell the heavy  South African  sausages. Deli sections in super markets offer   salami style sausage in the various European flavours.   All are a pale colonial imitation  of the real deal.

   I suspect the chief ingredient in all NZ sausages  is saw dust.






 
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« Reply #21 on: July 20, 2018, 07:50:03 am »

I can't say that I'm a fan of the American corndog, though I don't dislike them.

Being in Texas, sausages are aplenty and a bit of a science due to the German/Czech roots -

The typical cheap corndog encases an American style "Wiener" which is nothing more than a downsized and more processed variation of Italian Mortadella (a/k/a "Bologna" is the US) or Austrian Frankfurter Würstl (Vienese sausage), made with a combination of chicken and beef.  It's the cornmeal that makes the American Corn Dog taste good, otherwise it's ho-hum (not to be confused with the American "Vienna sausage" which although it is a derivative, is made as a softer much smaller link used as cocktail meat).

The New Zealand Hot Dog/ British battered Sausage,  - I don't know, sounds like the Brit sausage is similar to Bratwurst which is chopped pork and very greasy already, so dipping them in batter and deep frying them seems... too much - sort of like deep fried (striped) bacon, which we also have.

In my opinion beef sausages (reddish meat) are a bit better, tastier, for those types of applications, but admittedly are very salty. Known as Frankfurter Rindswurst in the 19th. C in Germany, the Frankfurters (or Franks as what we call them in the US), and are what people in New York use for their (American) Hot Dogs and are popular with the Jewish population (no pork).

Most sausages sold here are  of  the processed  pre cooked style.  They and the uncooked version are usually a mix of meats  with  some  having more beef or more pork and on a good day, lamb .  Occasionally there are venison or cheval sausages. Chicken sausages are a new  product.  The few independent butchers left    sell the heavy  South African  sausages. Deli sections in super markets offer   salami style sausage in the various European flavours.   All are a pale colonial imitation  of the real deal.

   I suspect the chief ingredient in all NZ sausages  is saw dust.






 

Here's the description of the Saveloy I found in Wiki:

Quote
A saveloy is a type of highly seasoned sausage, usually bright red, normally boiled and often available in British fish and chip shops, especially in London, Leeds, Newcastle, and the English Midlands and are occasionally also available fried in batter. The word is believed to originate from the Swiss-French cervelas or servelat, ultimately from the Latin cerebrus; originally a pig brain sausage particularly associated with Switzerland.

Although the saveloy was traditionally made from pork brains, the ingredients of a shop-bought sausage are typically pork (58%), water, rusk, pork fat, potato starch, salt, emulsifiers (tetrasodium diphosphate, disodium diphosphate), white pepper, spices, dried sage (sage), preservatives (sodium nitrite, potassium nitrate), and beef collagen casing

OK, so the Saveloy is not the same as Bratwurst, but rather much thinner and more processed, and like a pork sausage made with the seasoning of the American Frank (red and very salty) - thankfully not pig brain any more, but pork, seasoning and potato starch... We definitely not have Saveloys here. The closest we have is the New York style Beef Frank, which could be battered and fried... Thats the only way a Fish and Chips place could sell it here in America unless they imported the product.

Saveloy with Curry

American Beef Franks



In America sausages are almost never cured like in Europe either. Hence you can only get sausages in (a) completely raw uncooked and refrigerated, meant to crumble in a pan and be fried or boiled OR (b) fully cooked from the factory and packaged.

And by these two categories I mean ANY sausage, even Mexican style Chorizo. The Spanish style which is similar (not as hot but with chopped pork offal) does come cured, but only as an imported product. The German style Bratwurst may come cooked and packaged, or raw in it's natural casing meant to be boiled in water or grilled outside. The traditional cured German style Frankfurter (meant only to be heated in water - not cooked as it is a cured product) is something I haven't seen in America either - all Franks in America are precooked. Maybe as an imported product, yes.

Again, no confidence in the curing process on American soil. This practice does limit the availability of European style sausages - unless you pay premium prices for imported products - which we also have in copious amounts, just not made in the USA. I'm not sure why that is. I imagine it's got something to do with food regulation.

Now, there are 2  other varieties of more interesting, and arguably native, sausages. These are the traditional sausages from French Louisiana, namely the Creole "Andouille," which is a smoked sausage, made from pork, garlic, pepper, onions, wine, and seasonings. And the Cajun "Bouidin" sausage made from green onions, pork, pork liver (making it somewhat gritty/grainy), and rice with blood (Black Boudin) or no blood (more common nowadays). Both tend to be sold cooked.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andouille
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boudin
« Last Edit: July 20, 2018, 08:27:58 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #22 on: July 20, 2018, 12:01:51 pm »



Mr Wilhelm. On reading your post, I'm feeling  more than a little ripped off that NZ  was founded by the Scots and Irish  and not the French as in New Orleans.  We do though  have the treat of a favoured Black Sausage or Black Pudding, a traditional Irish food.

you can even batter the stuff.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_pudding




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Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #23 on: August 11, 2018, 01:55:26 am »


 Here are  a selection of  mobile food vendors offering classic kiwi kai  [NZ food].  This style of food truck and road side canteen  cuisine is becoming bolder and coming into it own.





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« Reply #24 on: August 17, 2018, 05:42:05 pm »

   I suspect the chief ingredient in all NZ sausages  is saw dust.



But when you consider what the alternatives could be, ('haven't seen any strays round here for ages …..') perhaps that isn't so bad Cheesy.

What does classic kiwi kai consists of?  I see a couple of the pics feature seafood, does it include meat dishes too?
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