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Author Topic: Gothic, Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau, Futurism; What Styles are Most Steampunk?  (Read 1868 times)
RJBowman
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« on: May 22, 2018, 08:01:54 pm »

I had this question in mind, looked online for design movements, and found this:
http://www.stedmunds.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Design-Movements-Timeline.pdf

The list starts with Arts and Crafts in 1850; maybe before that there was not such thing as an organized design "movement", but there certainly are older styles and trends.

Interesting that Futurism began in 1910:
https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&tbm=isch&q=futurism
It overlapped with both Cubism and Art Deco, and though chronologically on the cusp of the Edwardian, and should thematically tie in with current ideas of retro-futurism, it doesn't seem very steampunk all all. Is a recognizably steampunk aesthetic based on the futurism of that era even possible?

Streamline Modern is interesting:
https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&tbm=isch&q=Streamline%20Modern
It was influenced by the aerodynamic design of vehicles, which began with experimental designs in the 19th century. Could streamline be divorced from the Decco aesthetic and recombined with nouveau or earlier styles? Can anyone point to an example?

There seems to be something missing from this document; How do you classify the ornate industrial architecture of the early industrial age? The London sewage pumping plant with its florid metalwork, or the decorative smokestacks of Mississippi steamboats? Has it been named and documented and is missing from the list, or do we need to retroactively define a design school to encomas this aesthetic?
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2018, 01:52:27 am »



 How did I miss this thread - it is rather inspiring.

 Is that  " movements" or " trends" have become  commercially marketable  in the last 150 years. That before then, era and style were only described or labeled in hind sight?
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Lord Pentecost
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« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2018, 09:25:12 pm »

There are a few styles which to me lend themselves very well to steampunk.

The first has to Gothic, the Victorians effectively did this themselves especially when they built large infrastructure projects.


The second is streamlined, it was never a Victorian style, but it lends itself so well to a future imagining of Victorian technology.


The final one to me is arts and crafts, Steampunk is essential an arts and crafts movement, valuing small independent makers over mass produced goods.

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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2018, 11:09:06 pm »

I had this question in mind, looked online for design movements, and found this:
http://www.stedmunds.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Design-Movements-Timeline.pdf

The list starts with Arts and Crafts in 1850; maybe before that there was not such thing as an organized design "movement", but there certainly are older styles and trends.

Interesting that Futurism began in 1910:
https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&tbm=isch&q=futurism
It overlapped with both Cubism and Art Deco, and though chronologically on the cusp of the Edwardian, and should thematically tie in with current ideas of retro-futurism, it doesn't seem very steampunk all all. Is a recognizably steampunk aesthetic based on the futurism of that era even possible?

Streamline Modern is interesting:
https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&tbm=isch&q=Streamline%20Modern
It was influenced by the aerodynamic design of vehicles, which began with experimental designs in the 19th century. Could streamline be divorced from the Decco aesthetic and recombined with nouveau or earlier styles? Can anyone point to an example?

*snip*



I'm confused... do you mean Italian Futurism, or Modernism in general?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Futurism

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modernism

Modernism started before 1910, if you consider the American "Prarie School of Architecture" founded by Frank Lloyd Wright. The style is often associated with Arts and Crafts or the American version of Arts and Crafts. The problem with injecting either Modernism or Futurism into the Belle Époque is that the principal thesis is different from most prior movements. It is difficult to make that association and instead you are more correct in saying that Modernism overlapped with the previous or contemporary styles, such as Art Nouveau, and Futurism comes afterward as a specific precursor to Art Deco, but honestly almost overlaps as well. Note that there is barely one decade, maybe not even that, in difference between Prarie School and Art Nouveau. Italian Futurism arguably fully overlaps with Prarie School specifically thus both enter into the umbrella of Modernism.

Art Nouveau building, "Gran Hotel" in Mexico City, built 1899
with glass canopy built by Tiffany

But overlap doesn't mean equivalence. Art Nouveau's thesis is completely different -basically a Romantic Pagan style, very organic, say compared to the highly geometric Victorian Gothic Revival or Georgian Neo Classic, for example. In fact, the Art Nouveau thesis is much more analogous to what the Baroque/Rococo natural themes are to the Renaissance (Greco-Roman Classical Order). Or put it this way, Rococo is Catholic Naturism, and Art Nouveau is Pagan Naturism.

I believe Art Nouveau does flow into the Victorian mentality, but Modernism in general can't follow into the 19th. C.

If I was to associate the Prarie School with something else, I'd say it is a precursor to Art Deco, because it was all about geometric lines and polygons - which I imagine were inspired from the academic study of the art and science of Architecture itself. Think drafting tables and Tee-squares.

Prairie School of Architecture
The Darwin Martin House; Buffalo, NY built 1903–1905 by Frank Lloyd Wright

Tree of Life window,by Frank Lloyd Wright,1904. For the Darwin Martin House

Ward Willits House; Highland Park, Illinois, 1901 one of the first Prairie Houses by Frank Lloyd Wright




The only link between Modernism and the Victorian Era is in Lloyd Wright's insistence on using warm and natural materials like wood and stone to build his futuristic style. Frank Lloyd Wright was a big advocate of the thesis that the building materials should not only compliment the environment, but the building should actually be made from the local environment.

The Prarie School of thought evoked ranch houses and Native American themes, namely wilderness during the American Expansionist Era (Wild West) which is decidedly a Victorian Era theme. But outside of the materials and the Native American themes, the Victorian link becomes much more tenuous, because this was cutting edge style. Italian Futurism doesn't even have those two links with the Victorian Era.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prairie_School
Quote
The Prairie School houses (characterized by open plans, horizontal lines, and indigenous materials) were related to the American Arts and Crafts movement (hand craftsmanship, simplicity, function), an alternative to the then-dominant Classical Revival Style (Greek forms with occasional Roman influences). Some firms, like Purcell & Elmslie, however, consciously rejected the term "Arts and Crafts" for their work, which accepted the honest presence of machine worked surfaces. The Prairie School was also heavily influenced by the Idealistic Romantics (better homes would create better people) and the Transcendentalist philosophy of Ralph Waldo Emerson. In turn, the Prairie School architects influenced subsequent architectural idioms, particularly the Minimalists (less is more) and Bauhaus (form follows function), which was a mixture of De Stijl (grid-based design) and Constructivism (which emphasized the structure itself and the building materials).


If we compare Italian Futurism to Art Deco we can see some similarities, though to me it looks decidedly different. Same as  the difference between the late Prarie School and Italian Futurism:

Italian Futurism. Casa Sant'Elia, by Architect Antonio sant'Elia, from "Urban Utopia, a Sample" (1914)

Late Prarie School of Architecture (Modernism). Woodbury County Courthouse, Iowa, 1916-1918
by William L. Steele and Purcell and Elmslie

I disagree with "divorcing" Streamline Moderne from Art Deco, that makes no sense. Streamline Moderne is a subset of Art Deco , much in the same way Bauhaus is another subset. I would favour a different aesthetic. It simply comes in too late.

Art Deco Building in Polanco burrow, Mexico City (1930s maybe?)

*snip*

There seems to be something missing from this document; How do you classify the ornate industrial architecture of the early industrial age? The London sewage pumping plant with its florid metalwork, or the decorative smokestacks of Mississippi steamboats? Has it been named and documented and is missing from the list, or do we need to retroactively define a design school to encomas this aesthetic?


The style was a mixture of Neo Classical and Gothic Revival styles. Highly ornate, yet very geometric. By definition Neo Classical (approx. 1760-20th. C) is a derivative of the Renaissance Style (eg 1500s) which is of Greco-Roman derivation itself (Ancient), namely the Classical Order - again by definition. Gothic Revival is basically Medieval Romanticism starting in 1740-ish through the late 19th. C. Both styles are highly geometric and symmetric. May have "natural elements" but the flourishes themselves tend to be highly symmetric and geometric as well. The late 19th. C was characterised by a "revolt" away from these classical styles. Jugenstil and Art Nouveau were the first sharp break in architecture and commerical art that still happened during the Victorian Era, apart from Arts and Crafts. They were radical because the emphasized nature themes and assymetry with a distinctive lack of polygonal shapes and straight lines (Arts and Crafts still had geometric lines).

In the Fine Arts, Impressionism was the sharp break that happened (then Post Impressionism) from earlier styles. As the name indicates, artists broke with the idea of making photograph like paintings (the last incarnation in painting style), and instead broadened the brush strokes, seeking to decompose the elements of paint that give us color, shape and shade, and a sense of movement. Individually the brush strokes don't make sense, but if you stand back a few steps, a clear "impression" of the subject is captured.

Impressionism: Claude Monet, "Impression, soleil levant," 1872


Post Impressionism: Van Gogh, "Wheatfield with Crows," 1890.

« Last Edit: July 25, 2018, 01:50:21 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Banfili
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« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2018, 02:20:04 am »

Pushed into a choice of 'modern' design movements, I would have to go for Arts and Crafts, with perhaps a smidge of early Art Deco. Both are stylistically elegant, but with enough freedom of movement to aesthetically pleasing. Or perhaps Art Deco with a smidge of Arts and crafts! Not an easy choice to make for a prehistorian with her head stuck firmly, for now, in the Neolithic!
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2018, 01:39:34 am »



 Antipodean Revival.  The Atoipodes were colonised in the Georgian and  Victorian eras
 

https://www.facebook.com/antipodeanrevival/


https://www.pinterest.ca/sisterannette/antipodean-revival/
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RJBowman
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« Reply #6 on: July 28, 2018, 09:37:39 pm »

Antipodean Revival.  The Atoipodes were colonised in the Georgian and  Victorian eras
 https://www.facebook.com/antipodeanrevival/
https://www.pinterest.ca/sisterannette/antipodean-revival/

Thank you for the links. I have an idea for a South-Pacific steampunk project that might get off the ground some day, and that's the type of look I'm looking for.
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2018, 11:00:49 pm »

Antipodean Revival.  The Atoipodes were colonised in the Georgian and  Victorian eras
 https://www.facebook.com/antipodeanrevival/
https://www.pinterest.ca/sisterannette/antipodean-revival/

Thank you for the links. I have an idea for a South-Pacific steampunk project that might get off the ground some day, and that's the type of look I'm looking for.

 Its a distinctive look. The " Colonies" developed a  style of their own with various influences  from   the Pacific and oriental regions.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #8 on: July 28, 2018, 11:11:23 pm »

Antipodean Revival.  The Atoipodes were colonised in the Georgian and  Victorian eras
 https://www.facebook.com/antipodeanrevival/
https://www.pinterest.ca/sisterannette/antipodean-revival/

Thank you for the links. I have an idea for a South-Pacific steampunk project that might get off the ground some day, and that's the type of look I'm looking for.

The one thing to note is that both Victorian Era Antipoedian Houses and American Prarie houses, is that the roof is very shallow. Obviously that is not true for colder climes in the US, but true for the warmer states.

 Its a distinctive look. The " Colonies" developed a  style of their own with various influences  from   the Pacific and oriental regions.
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #9 on: July 29, 2018, 12:12:17 am »

 Which means Mr Wilhem, that we don't have attics.  There  are several common styles of house in the Antipodes that have flat roofs.   The 1920s through to 60s, flat roofs were everywhere in NZ . Art Deco, Spanish Mission.  There was the massive Napier earth quake in 1931 [?] that  generated  rebuilds  over several cities and towns. Post ww2  brought kiwi soldiers home and immigrants  from war torn Europe.  Work schemes put up small deco prefab  houses everywhere.  Suburban and coastal areas had them mushroom up.










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Banfili
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« Reply #10 on: July 29, 2018, 12:44:51 am »

Which means Mr Wilhem, that we don't have attics.  There  are several common styles of house in the Antipodes that have flat roofs.   The 1920s through to 60s, flat roofs were everywhere in NZ . Art Deco, Spanish Mission.  There was the massive Napier earth quake in 1931 [?] that  generated  rebuilds  over several cities and towns. Post ww2  brought kiwi soldiers home and immigrants  from war torn Europe.  Work schemes put up small deco prefab  houses everywhere.  Suburban and coastal areas had them mushroom up.

I rather like that look. We have 'em across the sea here too. They were very popular, especially in the cities and larger towns.
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Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #11 on: July 29, 2018, 12:58:17 am »

Which means Mr Wilhem, that we don't have attics.  There  are several common styles of house in the Antipodes that have flat roofs.   The 1920s through to 60s, flat roofs were everywhere in NZ . Art Deco, Spanish Mission.  There was the massive Napier earth quake in 1931 [?] that  generated  rebuilds  over several cities and towns. Post ww2  brought kiwi soldiers home and immigrants  from war torn Europe.  Work schemes put up small deco prefab  houses everywhere.  Suburban and coastal areas had them mushroom up.

I rather like that look. We have 'em across the sea here too. They were very popular, especially in the cities and larger towns.

 Sydney and Melbourne have  fine examples  of deco and Spanish Mission
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J. Wilhelm
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Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


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« Reply #12 on: July 29, 2018, 03:33:14 am »

Which means Mr Wilhem, that we don't have attics.  There  are several common styles of house in the Antipodes that have flat roofs.   The 1920s through to 60s, flat roofs were everywhere in NZ . Art Deco, Spanish Mission.  There was the massive Napier earth quake in 1931 [?] that  generated  rebuilds  over several cities and towns. Post ww2  brought kiwi soldiers home and immigrants  from war torn Europe.  Work schemes put up small deco prefab  houses everywhere.  Suburban and coastal areas had them mushroom up.


I rather like that look. We have 'em across the sea here too. They were very popular, especially in the cities and larger towns.


 Sydney and Melbourne have  fine examples  of deco and Spanish Mission


Do these appear in Mr. Fisher's Mysteries?

Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries, Series 1 trailer


Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries Series One Trailer
« Last Edit: July 29, 2018, 03:36:06 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #13 on: July 29, 2018, 09:56:12 am »

Which means Mr Wilhem, that we don't have attics.  There  are several common styles of house in the Antipodes that have flat roofs.   The 1920s through to 60s, flat roofs were everywhere in NZ . Art Deco, Spanish Mission.  There was the massive Napier earth quake in 1931 [?] that  generated  rebuilds  over several cities and towns. Post ww2  brought kiwi soldiers home and immigrants  from war torn Europe.  Work schemes put up small deco prefab  houses everywhere.  Suburban and coastal areas had them mushroom up.


I rather like that look. We have 'em across the sea here too. They were very popular, especially in the cities and larger towns.


 Sydney and Melbourne have  fine examples  of deco and Spanish Mission


Do these appear in Mr. Fisher's Mysteries?

Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries, Series 1 trailer

Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries Series One Trailer


  They would have used heritage houses for the show.  It was a charming series.   It was evocative of the era
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