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Poll
Question: What do food  vendors  flog off at gatherings  or what would you want them to?
Finger sandwich - 1 (10%)
Cupcakes - 1 (10%)
Scones - 1 (10%)
Burgers - 1 (10%)
French Fries - 0 (0%)
Roast meats - 2 (20%)
Fish n Chips - 0 (0%)
Other - 4 (40%)
Total Voters: 10

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Author Topic: What manner of street foods go down at themed Events?  (Read 10219 times)
Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #25 on: April 20, 2018, 04:33:56 pm »

It's only a tasting stall, so the menu consists entirely of a little disposable container of up to 3 chunks of cooked meat, usually 'roo, emu, and croc; and a decidedly anachronistic chunk of damper.
I'm sorry, "damper?" I understood everything else...

 A type of flour and water dough bread  used by antipodean bushmen and hikers.  Not as bad as it sounds. It probably originated from Irish  and British  peasant cooking 

https://australianfoodtimeline.com.au/australian-damper/

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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #26 on: April 20, 2018, 04:36:51 pm »

We have deer for the same reason we have feral goats, horses, donkeys, poultry, pigs and rabbits, not to mention water buffalo! - and camels! The camels were and are useful. In the old days they were used caravans for the transportation of goods and peoples in desert areas, now used for tourism and being sold back to Arabia for racing. Australia has the largest wild camel population in the world! Deer, goats, pigs and rabbits were also introduced species - the earlier European settlers wanted the familiar, without thinking or realising or caring, for that matter, just what 'domesticated' animals could do to such a fragile environment as Australia. Same goes for horses, dogs and cats. No natural enemies for any of them, apart from eagles, and not to mention foxes, which were introduced to provided 'sport' for the 'gentry'.

 We don't have  camels here but we have every other introduced species you mention, plus a few Aussie imports  such as wallaby going wild, kookaburra, pelican  and the odd turtle
  Camel  meat is supposed to be  very healthy  and tasty.

Camel Kabob for those airship crewmen serving over arid regions?

 Mind that flame   Shocked  Wink   that idea does lend an exotic flavour.  It could be like cruising in a giant safari tent
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #27 on: April 20, 2018, 08:05:05 pm »

We have deer for the same reason we have feral goats, horses, donkeys, poultry, pigs and rabbits, not to mention water buffalo! - and camels! The camels were and are useful. In the old days they were used caravans for the transportation of goods and peoples in desert areas, now used for tourism and being sold back to Arabia for racing. Australia has the largest wild camel population in the world! Deer, goats, pigs and rabbits were also introduced species - the earlier European settlers wanted the familiar, without thinking or realising or caring, for that matter, just what 'domesticated' animals could do to such a fragile environment as Australia. Same goes for horses, dogs and cats. No natural enemies for any of them, apart from eagles, and not to mention foxes, which were introduced to provided 'sport' for the 'gentry'.
We don't have  camels here but we have every other introduced species you mention, plus a few Aussie imports  such as wallaby going wild, kookaburra, pelican  and the odd turtle
Camel  meat is supposed to be  very healthy  and tasty.

Camel Kabob for those airship crewmen serving over arid regions?

 Mind that flame   Shocked  Wink   that idea does lend an exotic flavour.  It could be like cruising in a giant safari tent

Cooked over an electric grill, of course  Grin
« Last Edit: April 20, 2018, 10:56:08 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Banfili
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« Reply #28 on: April 20, 2018, 11:23:00 pm »

Damper - unleavened bread, made from flour & water, with a pinch of salt, usually baked in the ashes of a campfire, a cast iron pot or in a regular oven. Basically an oversized scone! Used in Australia, especially in the bush, and was a staple of pioneer food. The use of yeast in early pioneer kitchens was virtually non-existent. Most bread was home cooked, many early kitchens were outdoors under a lean-to, and baker's ovens were a distant dream!

Damper is nice if well made, hot from the fire and spread with butter and 'cocky's joy' (golden syrup) or honey. Even nice with vegemite!
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #29 on: April 21, 2018, 01:27:40 am »

Damper - unleavened bread, made from flour & water, with a pinch of salt, usually baked in the ashes of a campfire, a cast iron pot or in a regular oven. Basically an oversized scone! Used in Australia, especially in the bush, and was a staple of pioneer food. The use of yeast in early pioneer kitchens was virtually non-existent. Most bread was home cooked, many early kitchens were outdoors under a lean-to, and baker's ovens were a distant dream!

Damper is nice if well made, hot from the fire and spread with butter and 'cocky's joy' (golden syrup) or honey. Even nice with vegemite!

We've beaten the "biscuit" horse to death many times, but it's probably worthy to note that Damper while larger in size, sounds suspiciously close to the American Biscuit before baking soda was invented. Enough air was beaten into the dough that the bread didn't just turn into a brick when baking only using wheat flour and water. The American Biscuit was later modified in the Wild West as a type of soda bread with the addition of pearlash and later baking soda, to look more like a Scone in consistency.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biscuit_(bread)
Quote
The biscuit emerged as a distinct food type in the early 19th century, before the American Civil War. Cooks created a cheaply produced addition for their meals that required no yeast, which was expensive and difficult to store. With no leavening agents except the bitter-tasting pearlash available, beaten biscuits were laboriously beaten and folded to incorporate air into the dough which expanded when heated in the oven causing the biscuit to rise. In eating, the advantage of the biscuit over a slice of bread was that it was harder, and hence kept its shape when wiping up gravy in the popular combination biscuits and gravy.
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Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #30 on: April 22, 2018, 12:06:56 am »

Damper - unleavened bread, made from flour & water, with a pinch of salt, usually baked in the ashes of a campfire, a cast iron pot or in a regular oven. Basically an oversized scone! Used in Australia, especially in the bush, and was a staple of pioneer food. The use of yeast in early pioneer kitchens was virtually non-existent. Most bread was home cooked, many early kitchens were outdoors under a lean-to, and baker's ovens were a distant dream!

Damper is nice if well made, hot from the fire and spread with butter and 'cocky's joy' (golden syrup) or honey. Even nice with vegemite!

We've beaten the "biscuit" horse to death many times, but it's probably worthy to note that Damper while larger in size, sounds suspiciously close to the American Biscuit before baking soda was invented. Enough air was beaten into the dough that the bread didn't just turn into a brick when baking only using wheat flour and water. The American Biscuit was later modified in the Wild West as a type of soda bread with the addition of pearlash and later baking soda, to look more like a Scone in consistency.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biscuit_(bread)
Quote
The biscuit emerged as a distinct food type in the early 19th century, before the American Civil War. Cooks created a cheaply produced addition for their meals that required no yeast, which was expensive and difficult to store. With no leavening agents except the bitter-tasting pearlash available, beaten biscuits were laboriously beaten and folded to incorporate air into the dough which expanded when heated in the oven causing the biscuit to rise. In eating, the advantage of the biscuit over a slice of bread was that it was harder, and hence kept its shape when wiping up gravy in the popular combination biscuits and gravy.

 While " researching  the origins" of damper,  the civil War be read was mentioned.  It will have a  similar origin.  Transported  criminal labour / indentured servants, making do  with what meagre rations they had
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #31 on: April 22, 2018, 02:28:11 am »

Here's a thought. In researching the classes of flat breads around the world, I found that the Pita bread and the Pizza may have a common etymological origin, if not a culinary one. Additionally I found that Italian Pizza is well documented in Italy before the 1830's when it was sold as a street food. But more importantly I found that Pizza was brought to the United States early in the first few years of the 20th. C. It therefore strikes me that even Pizza can be folded into a Steampunk gathering, being chronologically and culturally correct within Italy and the United States.... Just a (subversive) thought.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2018, 02:30:17 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Banfili
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« Reply #32 on: April 22, 2018, 03:28:49 am »

Just as an addendum to J. Wilhelm's post, what would be the appropriate toppings for a Steampunk version of 'pizza as street food'?
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #33 on: April 22, 2018, 04:55:53 am »

Just as an addendum to J. Wilhelm's post, what would be the appropriate toppings for a Steampunk version of 'pizza as street food'?

Tomato sauce with olives, mushrooms, capers, crab, crawfish and squid/calamari, of course! Kraken if you can get it.  Grin

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seafood_pizza
« Last Edit: April 22, 2018, 04:58:27 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
von Corax
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« Reply #34 on: April 22, 2018, 05:24:55 am »

Just as an addendum to J. Wilhelm's post, what would be the appropriate toppings for a Steampunk version of 'pizza as street food'?

Tomato sauce with olives, mushrooms, capers, crab, crawfish and squid/calamari, of course! Kraken if you can get it.  Grin

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seafood_pizza

It would have to be baked in a wood-burning brick or stone oven; anything less would overcook the kraken and the calamari. (My nephew worked one summer in such a pizzeria; their oven could bake a perfect pizza in 30 seconds. 40 seconds was far too long; at that point you would leave it in for the rest of a minute, sweep it into the ash pan, and start over.)
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #35 on: April 22, 2018, 07:38:49 am »



 Pizza  was brought to Italy by the invading  Moors. It is a traditional Arab dish from the Mahgreb.  Other wise the same rules apply. It's a flat bread  used as a plate base  and toppings.

   Glue a cog on it and call it steampunk

 https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_pizza

  Nearly all  versions over the millenia of the various origin involve cheese. Meat, fish  fruit, vegetables   are a common theme.

  In keeping with the Georgian /Victorian steam theme: the exotic  fruit versions sound  enticing. Dates, nuts, candied and spices. Perhaps  a savoury   round with  sausage, tomato, onion and herbs.  Maybe an intrepid  mix of safari or jungle  toppings,  camel, crocodile,  emu,  cassava an vine  growing  sides.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #36 on: April 22, 2018, 09:51:14 pm »


   Glue a cog on it and call it steampunk



But cogs are so hard on the teeth!
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #37 on: April 22, 2018, 11:50:18 pm »


   Glue a cog on it and call it steampunk



But cogs are so hard on the teeth!

 Its the bits that get between the teeth  that are aggravating
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #38 on: April 23, 2018, 02:18:49 am »



 Pizza  was brought to Italy by the invading  Moors. It is a traditional Arab dish from the Mahgreb.  Other wise the same rules apply. It's a flat bread  used as a plate base  and toppings.

   Glue a cog on it and call it steampunk

 https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_pizza

  Nearly all  versions over the millenia of the various origin involve cheese. Meat, fish  fruit, vegetables   are a common theme.

  In keeping with the Georgian /Victorian steam theme: the exotic  fruit versions sound  enticing. Dates, nuts, candied and spices. Perhaps  a savoury   round with  sausage, tomato, onion and herbs.  Maybe an intrepid  mix of safari or jungle  toppings,  camel, crocodile,  emu,  cassava an vine  growing  sides.

I think it precedes the 6th C. Moors invading Europe by more than7 centuries, actually..
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Fairley B. Strange
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« Reply #39 on: April 23, 2018, 08:13:49 am »

Might I suggest that the two universal staples of street-foods are:

1. It should be extravagantly unhealthy - charred meat, fried things, gooey sugar things - often to the level of being unidentifiable but addictive

2. It should be on a stick or in a folded bit of bread

To that end, I belive there should be a 'Fried things of the world' thread around here somewhere.
Bon appetit...
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #40 on: April 23, 2018, 02:57:23 pm »

Might I suggest that the two universal staples of street-foods are:

1. It should be extravagantly unhealthy - charred meat, fried things, gooey sugar things - often to the level of being unidentifiable but addictive

2. It should be on a stick or in a folded bit of bread

To that end, I belive there should be a 'Fried things of the world' thread around here somewhere.
Bon appetit...

 Oh and  go soggy and floppy  befor you finish eating
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Banfili
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« Reply #41 on: April 23, 2018, 04:13:43 pm »

With squishy bits falling out the ends!
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Cora Courcelle
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« Reply #42 on: April 23, 2018, 05:33:09 pm »

And it must smell much, much better than you know it is going to taste.
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« Reply #43 on: April 23, 2018, 08:17:30 pm »

Might I suggest that the two universal staples of street-foods are:

1. It should be extravagantly unhealthy - charred meat, fried things, gooey sugar things - often to the level of being unidentifiable but addictive

2. It should be on a stick or in a folded bit of bread

To that end, I belive there should be a 'Fried things of the world' thread around here somewhere.
Bon appetit...


There is. I started a The "Fried Foods from Around the World" thread sometime back at the Off Topic section:

http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,40054.0.html

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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #44 on: July 14, 2018, 12:03:57 am »

And it must smell much, much better than you know it is going to taste.

 Why does it smell so good in the distance ... and taste  like the packet it came in...
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #45 on: July 14, 2018, 12:09:29 am »



 Its news articles like this that inspire me.  The vagabond life of a food trucker.

It refers to the food truck industry in Australia and New Zealand. I am sure though, it  would be similar in the US, Europe and Britain.  I've read books  and Web sites  about the diverse  style trucks and foods. It sounds like an interesting concept that has come as long way from the hot dog and chips of the old days in an old converted  family caravan.

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=12059882
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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #46 on: September 04, 2018, 04:03:57 am »

.


« Last Edit: September 04, 2018, 02:08:59 pm by Mercury Wells » Logged

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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #47 on: September 04, 2018, 11:38:58 am »

It's only a tasting stall, so the menu consists entirely of a little disposable container of up to 3 chunks of cooked meat, usually 'roo, emu, and croc; and a decidedly anachronistic chunk of damper.

I'm sorry, "damper?" I understood everything else...


 This conundrum has arisen  on other threads.  It's a  contraversial debate as to where " damper" evolved. Scotland, Ireland, Australia or New Zealand.  Fundamentally its an unleavened bread  used to mop up stews  and meat juice. It can be eaten with jam or similar

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damper_(food)

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bush_bread
 
http://www.theoldfoodie.com/2012/04/damper-details.html?m=1

https://www.google.co.nz/amp/s/blog.raymears.com/2015/05/22/how-to-cook-outdoors-cree-bannock/amp/

http://www.wikiwand.com/en/Soda_bread

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Mercury Wells
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« Reply #48 on: September 15, 2018, 01:24:10 am »

Yorkshire Puds of various sizes stuffed with:-
Pork, crackling, stuffing & gravy. Et Cetera.
Fish & proper chips (never "french fries!)
Various Fruits & custard/sauces.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2018, 01:34:28 am by Mercury Wells » Logged
Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #49 on: September 15, 2018, 02:55:55 am »



Mr Mercury. That has  set my taste buds alight
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