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Poll
Question: What do food  vendors  flog off at gatherings  or what would you want them to?
Finger sandwich - 1 (10%)
Cupcakes - 1 (10%)
Scones - 1 (10%)
Burgers - 1 (10%)
French Fries - 0 (0%)
Roast meats - 2 (20%)
Fish n Chips - 0 (0%)
Other - 4 (40%)
Total Voters: 10

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Author Topic: What manner of street foods go down at themed Events?  (Read 8036 times)
Hurricane Annie
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« on: April 14, 2018, 04:53:33 am »

 

 
Steam themed Events here  in this part of the Antipodes, tend to be low key  and involve tea drinking and sponge cake.   It's the colonial missionary influence. What do  the more civilised  parts of the world serve up to thronging hordes?  What would be more appropriate etiquette for food and beverages?

 






 
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Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2018, 02:11:35 am »


 Surely there is more than  club sandwiches, sausage rolls and  Devonshire teas to this business








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Melrose
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« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2018, 12:28:28 pm »

I will not hear a disparaging remark about the Devonshire Tea! The very epitome of gourmet comestible when I was at my mother's knee and other low joints! And I will defend the sausage roll to my last glop of tomato sauce! Wink
To be honest, my mind is a blank as to what else might be served. Snags and onion and cocktail frankfurts are not really genre foods, in my mind. Nope, still love Devonshire teas.
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Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2018, 08:53:28 pm »

I will not hear a disparaging remark about the Devonshire Tea! The very epitome of gourmet comestible when I was at my mother's knee and other low joints! And I will defend the sausage roll to my last glop of tomato sauce! Wink
To be honest, my mind is a blank as to what else might be served. Snags and onion and cocktail frankfurts are not really genre foods, in my mind. Nope, still love Devonshire teas.

 There is something about  jam, cream with a small flour based ptoduct that is ultimately very satisfying...
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Miranda.T
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2018, 11:28:58 pm »

Once I spot the appropriate bits I still want to make up an Edwardian style chafing dish, which can of course be used for alfresco cooking. Here are a few ideas for recipes - http://www.edwardianpromenade.com/food/the-gilded-age-craze-for-the-chafing-dish/ (although I'll pass on the sheep's brains recpie I saw being made up via a chafing dish in the programme Back in Time for Dinner...)

Yours,
Miranda.
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2018, 04:20:13 am »

Once I spot the appropriate bits I still want to make up an Edwardian style chafing dish, which can of course be used for alfresco cooking. Here are a few ideas for recipes - http://www.edwardianpromenade.com/food/the-gilded-age-craze-for-the-chafing-dish/ (although I'll pass on the sheep's brains recpie I saw being made up via a chafing dish in the programme Back in Time for Dinner...)

Yours,
Miranda.


That, Dear Miss Miranda,  is an excellent proposition.   The 'chafing dish"   could have a plethora of uses.  Steaming, sauté, codling , heating, simmering. Kedgeree or crepes for brunch.  Poached or scrambled eggs. Pomme de fritte. Custard treats.  Saute fruit.  Tiny savour sausages  [my late father enjoyed fried sheep's brains. He was that generation where nothing was wasted ;  { ]


It could be used for domestic  or commercial use.  I'm wondering if indeed I have seen it is use at   childhood familiy weddings. [weddings of family members I attended as a child - not child weddings].

  The implement would have more applications for civilised use than  its very poor relation, the  common rice cooker. A piece of equipment that is touch and go at the best of times.


 Now Miss Miranda you have me off on another journey of discovery...
 
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Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2018, 07:03:09 am »


 A toast for the chafing dish. Recipes for  feasting at breakfast or supper, as accompanied by the ubiquitous toast cracker. [the oysters might have to join Miranda T's  sweet breads].

http://www.bartleby.com/87/0035.html
 
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chironex
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Australia Australia


The typing jellyfish monster


« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2018, 07:41:17 am »

The closest we get to "themed events" round my way, there is usually just the usual "pie/burger" cart, a mobile barista, various kinds of drink sellers, an ice-cream van, and occasionally an indigenous food tasting cart. Sometimes they may add something more exotic, such as the Brazilian Street Food van, but mostly we can only wish for Devonshire teas and club sandwiches.
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #8 on: April 16, 2018, 04:27:16 pm »

The closest we get to "themed events" round my way, there is usually just the usual "pie/burger" cart, a mobile barista, various kinds of drink sellers, an ice-cream van, and occasionally an indigenous food tasting cart. Sometimes they may add something more exotic, such as the Brazilian Street Food van, but mostly we can only wish for Devonshire teas and club sandwiches.

 Years back, I recall a mobile barista  that used to do the rounds,  with a  counter in the form of a bi plane wing. A   vendor ahead of their time.  What does Australian indigenous  food  have on the  truck menu?   Here in NZ we occasionally get an electric hangi, fry bread or  fern shoot side. Its a market that could be exploited further.

 
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chironex
Snr. Officer
****
Australia Australia


The typing jellyfish monster


« Reply #9 on: April 18, 2018, 07:24:56 am »

It's only a tasting stall, so the menu consists entirely of a little disposable container of up to 3 chunks of cooked meat, usually 'roo, emu, and croc; and a decidedly anachronistic chunk of damper.
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #10 on: April 18, 2018, 05:59:50 pm »

It's only a tasting stall, so the menu consists entirely of a little disposable container of up to 3 chunks of cooked meat, usually 'roo, emu, and croc; and a decidedly anachronistic chunk of damper.

 Have you tasted the roof, emu and Croc?   Are their flavours and textures palatable? Maybe one day they might extend it to native vegetable, fruits  and insects prepared in a traditional manner
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Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
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Australia Australia



« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2018, 01:10:54 am »

'roo, cooked well, is very nice. Lean and very good for you, but, like goat, needs to be prepared well. "Bambi"(i.e., venison) burgers are an occasional treat if you get to the right bush event, like an agricultural field day - all sorts of odd goodies turn up!

NITV, an offshoot from SBS Australia, and SBS33, the cooking channel for SBS, will often have programmes on indigenous foods and the preparation thereof.
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montysaurus
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United States United States


« Reply #12 on: April 19, 2018, 02:18:09 am »

Ice Cream in Cones and Flavored Ices are Victorian. Recipes for cones date back to the 1880's. So for warmer events, these would be great.
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #13 on: April 19, 2018, 10:49:36 am »

Ice Cream in Cones and Flavored Ices are Victorian. Recipes for cones date back to the 1880's. So for warmer events, these would be great.

 Ice-cream always goes down well
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #14 on: April 19, 2018, 10:52:27 am »

'roo, cooked well, is very nice. Lean and very good for you, but, like goat, needs to be prepared well. "Bambi"(i.e., venison) burgers are an occasional treat if you get to the right bush event, like an agricultural field day - all sorts of odd goodies turn up!

NITV, an offshoot from SBS Australia, and SBS33, the cooking channel for SBS, will often have programmes on indigenous foods and the preparation thereof.


 They  occasionally  have venison in sausages or similar in the supermarkets.  Burgers or mince could be interesting.  Roo here is mainly in pet food. Though they did try it  for human consumption, in the supermarket years ago. They say it has  low cholesterol. 

 
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #15 on: April 19, 2018, 08:51:35 pm »

'roo, cooked well, is very nice. Lean and very good for you, but, like goat, needs to be prepared well. "Bambi"(i.e., venison) burgers are an occasional treat if you get to the right bush event, like an agricultural field day - all sorts of odd goodies turn up!

NITV, an offshoot from SBS Australia, and SBS33, the cooking channel for SBS, will often have programmes on indigenous foods and the preparation thereof.

You eat deer down under?? How could you!?  (And how did you even get deer down there anyway?)

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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #16 on: April 20, 2018, 12:06:12 am »

'roo, cooked well, is very nice. Lean and very good for you, but, like goat, needs to be prepared well. "Bambi"(i.e., venison) burgers are an occasional treat if you get to the right bush event, like an agricultural field day - all sorts of odd goodies turn up!

NITV, an offshoot from SBS Australia, and SBS33, the cooking channel for SBS, will often have programmes on indigenous foods and the preparation thereof.

You eat deer down under?? How could you!?  (And how did you even get deer down there anyway?)


 Here is more information than you will want to know

https://teara.govt.nz/en/deer-and-deer-farming

 And an urban myth mystery [ the survival of the Canadian moose has never been properly verified]

https://www.odt.co.nz/regions/southland/secret-snaps-reveal-elusive-fiordland-moose

https://www.odt.co.nz/regions/southland/secret-snaps-reveal-elusive-fiordland-moose

https://www.nzgeo.com/stories/shadow-theatre/


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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #17 on: April 20, 2018, 12:42:10 am »

'roo, cooked well, is very nice. Lean and very good for you, but, like goat, needs to be prepared well. "Bambi"(i.e., venison) burgers are an occasional treat if you get to the right bush event, like an agricultural field day - all sorts of odd goodies turn up!

NITV, an offshoot from SBS Australia, and SBS33, the cooking channel for SBS, will often have programmes on indigenous foods and the preparation thereof.

You eat deer down under?? How could you!?  (And how did you even get deer down there anyway?)


 Here is more information than you will want to know

https://teara.govt.nz/en/deer-and-deer-farming

 And an urban myth mystery [ the survival of the Canadian moose has never been properly verified]

https://www.odt.co.nz/regions/southland/secret-snaps-reveal-elusive-fiordland-moose

https://www.odt.co.nz/regions/southland/secret-snaps-reveal-elusive-fiordland-moose

https://www.nzgeo.com/stories/shadow-theatre/




Nothing like the steady hand of man to mess things up...

Here in Austin we have an overpopulation of "urban deer." The city is one of the greenest cities in the country, with most of that greenery being trees, both native and imported. Some large areas of the city were left undeveloped or under-developed, when in the 1980s it was found that it was the habitat for an endangered species, the Mexican Salamander.  Since then, restrictions on building have relaxed (post 2000s), but the city was left with large swathes of "Greenbelt" areas as the city expanded beyond Travis County into Williamson, Hayes and other counties.

The deer were left in the green areas (including Emma Long Metropilotan Park), basically in entirely undeveloped areas along creeks and tributaries to the Colorado River. With few predators to speak of, the deer population exploded, especially in the western parts of the city. To date in the North-Central-West of the city you have entire families of deer than roam the (1970s era) residential areas, and seem to be stopped at nothing except the Loop 1 Highway. Otherwise they would just waltz their way downtown.

It is not uncommon for me to have to go around families of deer as I walk home, and if I encounter 1 or more bucks to have to go around, so as not have an "incident." During "reproductive periods" it is quite easy to smell the bucks, even 1-1/2 blocks away. Stinky bastards they are. Along Route 19, a North-South pathway from Downtown to Central North West, the young bucks will actually "race" against the city buses at night, trying to get in front of the bus and cross in front of the bus, much to the annoyance and consternation of bus drivers.

The local supermarket(s) used to sell "Deer Corn" (feed), apparently due to the Texas tradition for hunting... *except* that this is mostly an urban, liberal, upper middle class area of the city, populated by professors and international students as well as Jewish and Christian religious groups. NOBODY OWNS A RIFLE IN THIS AREA. The only reason anyone bought Deer Corn was to adorn their backyard with the lovable creatures.

Finally about a decade ago, the local supermarket stopped selling Deer Corn, but by then the damage was done. Homeowners were responsible for attracting deer from the river areas to the uphill residential areas. Ever since, the deer venture every night into the residential areas. I'm surprised I have not seen a deer family come into the supermarket.

Deer is consumed traditionally in Texas, but there is a caveat. The US Dept. of Agriculture will not sign off on the venison meat. The reason is that Central Texas is also home to one of the largest concentrations of blood consuming bats (and also we have the largest urban bat population in the world, but I guess you saw that coming). You see, bats and racoons - the other overpopulation in the area, are carriers for RABIES. A terrible and very fatal disease for any mammal that has no cure, and which *potentially* affects the deer population (though no direct cases of Rabies by consumption of venison have ever been reported).

I hear The Land Down Under has erradicated the disease. Oddly, the most common strain of Rabies virus in the United States is actually an Australian strain!!

The other major disease which only affects humans when the deer are alive (as opposed to hunted) is Lime disease - a disease carried by the ticks feeding from the blood of deer. Those ticks are a more present danger to humans, particularly hunters and farmers.

The consequence is that while venison is traditional in Texas, the consumption of venison is rather curbed in Central Texas, and discouraged by the government, and never do you see venison in the supermarkets, or at least I haven't seen it in Austin (Houstonites and Dallas-mites, please feel free to chime in if I'm wrong). Deer has to be hunted in private land or in public land under population control programmes, and venison is usually only obtained and prepared through small farmers and private hands... A friend from New Mexico who tried to buy Venison for Christmas two years ago, actually had to have the venison shipped from New Mexico!
« Last Edit: April 20, 2018, 01:25:30 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #18 on: April 20, 2018, 12:57:07 am »



 Humans are interloping into the deer's natural habitat.  There are no longer any  natural predators left  there to keep deer population down.  They will eventually wander in to the super market  seeking food from humans.   They already have the Austin humans trained.  You give way in the street. Leave food for them.

Invading your homes and  malls is only a matter of time...
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #19 on: April 20, 2018, 01:05:07 am »



 Humans are interloping into the deer's natural habitat.  There are no longer any  natural predators left  there to keep deer population down.  They will eventually wander in to the super market  seeking food from humans.   They already have the Austin humans trained.  You give way in the street. Leave food for them.

Invading your homes and  malls is only a matter of time...

There's no question about it. We definitely need to take control. Or if we can't beat them we will join them!

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Banfili
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Australia Australia



« Reply #20 on: April 20, 2018, 01:43:19 am »

We have deer for the same reason we have feral goats, horses, donkeys, poultry, pigs and rabbits, not to mention water buffalo! - and camels! The camels were and are useful. In the old days they were used caravans for the transportation of goods and peoples in desert areas, now used for tourism and being sold back to Arabia for racing. Australia has the largest wild camel population in the world! Deer, goats, pigs and rabbits were also introduced species - the earlier European settlers wanted the familiar, without thinking or realising or caring, for that matter, just what 'domesticated' animals could do to such a fragile environment as Australia. Same goes for horses, dogs and cats. No natural enemies for any of them, apart from eagles, and not to mention foxes, which were introduced to provided 'sport' for the 'gentry'.
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Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #21 on: April 20, 2018, 03:18:39 am »

We have deer for the same reason we have feral goats, horses, donkeys, poultry, pigs and rabbits, not to mention water buffalo! - and camels! The camels were and are useful. In the old days they were used caravans for the transportation of goods and peoples in desert areas, now used for tourism and being sold back to Arabia for racing. Australia has the largest wild camel population in the world! Deer, goats, pigs and rabbits were also introduced species - the earlier European settlers wanted the familiar, without thinking or realising or caring, for that matter, just what 'domesticated' animals could do to such a fragile environment as Australia. Same goes for horses, dogs and cats. No natural enemies for any of them, apart from eagles, and not to mention foxes, which were introduced to provided 'sport' for the 'gentry'.

 We don't have  camels here but we have every other introduced species you mention, plus a few Aussie imports  such as wallaby going wild, kookaburra, pelican  and the odd turtle
  Camel  meat is supposed to be  very healthy  and tasty.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #22 on: April 20, 2018, 08:42:57 am »

We have deer for the same reason we have feral goats, horses, donkeys, poultry, pigs and rabbits, not to mention water buffalo! - and camels! The camels were and are useful. In the old days they were used caravans for the transportation of goods and peoples in desert areas, now used for tourism and being sold back to Arabia for racing. Australia has the largest wild camel population in the world! Deer, goats, pigs and rabbits were also introduced species - the earlier European settlers wanted the familiar, without thinking or realising or caring, for that matter, just what 'domesticated' animals could do to such a fragile environment as Australia. Same goes for horses, dogs and cats. No natural enemies for any of them, apart from eagles, and not to mention foxes, which were introduced to provided 'sport' for the 'gentry'.

 We don't have  camels here but we have every other introduced species you mention, plus a few Aussie imports  such as wallaby going wild, kookaburra, pelican  and the odd turtle
  Camel  meat is supposed to be  very healthy  and tasty.

Camel Kabob for those airship crewmen serving over arid regions?
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Banfili
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Australia Australia



« Reply #23 on: April 20, 2018, 03:01:49 pm »

I remember brandy snaps - kind of crispy, caramel wafer rolled into a tube and piped with whipped cream or even ice cream!
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von Corax
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« Reply #24 on: April 20, 2018, 04:00:40 pm »

It's only a tasting stall, so the menu consists entirely of a little disposable container of up to 3 chunks of cooked meat, usually 'roo, emu, and croc; and a decidedly anachronistic chunk of damper.
I'm sorry, "damper?" I understood everything else...
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