The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
June 25, 2019, 12:29:25 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Poll
Question: Prefab  Housing  programme proposed  as to  be provided by the NZ  Governmental  Housing Corporation
Practical Solution - 3 (30%)
Shoddy Shacks - 0 (0%)
Scarily Dystopian - 0 (0%)
Slum Ghetto - 5 (50%)
Tiny Home Tyranny - 2 (20%)
Total Voters: 10

Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Steampunk Prefab: Practical Family & Social Housing  (Read 7551 times)
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« on: March 30, 2018, 12:15:38 am »

 The current New Zealand government is proposing to use Crown land and buy up land banked property to build  homes for purchase by the public  and for use as social housing  for state tenants.  4000 houses on 29 hectares. 70m2 sections.

  Would the  pundits  and experts on the forum like to weigh in with their views and suggestions.

https://i.stuff.co.nz/business/money/101956360/the-future-of-nz-housing-is-prefabs-and-180000-tiny-homes
https://i.stuff.co.nz/auckland/102567247/4000-homes-to-be-built-in-mt-albert
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12020092
Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2018, 12:19:17 am »

If it was up to me,  the subdivisions would look like these prefabs,   that were once manufactured in New Zealand



Logged
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2018, 01:59:36 am »

Honestly MS. Annie, I'm not sure that Steampunk has much to say on present day city planning, unless you're willing to argue we are recreating 19th C tenamemts, and then throwing in some dystopian fantasy...
Logged

Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2018, 02:29:34 am »

Honestly MS. Annie, I'm not sure that Steampunk has much to say on present day city planning, unless you're willing to argue we are recreating 19th C tenamemts, and then throwing in some dystopian fantasy...

 The general consensus  in NZ, is that the government is harking back to the tenement slum ghetto  that colonists left behind in  the ' old country'.   The  plans show  streets   ultra modern prefab  row housing of 50m2 and tinier. The  current regime seem determined to herd  the populace into tiny  multi dwelling  housing in dystopian  design  of social engineering.

 Put it this way, we have a population of under 5 million in an island nation approximately the land area of Japan.  The population has recently expanded  at a rapid pace through immigration. Nearly a million in the last decade. A 20% increase. We have around 200 000 persons in non secure housing,  including 50 000  living in the street. People are living in sheds, motels,  in vans and tarpaulin  encampments.

 There should be no  cause for the government  to insist  that  everyone should  learn to accept living in high rises of tiny  multi dwelling housing.  The intention is for the housing to be purchased or rented from the state.   The public are  forming  concerns about the  agenda  of the government. It's just not the Kiwi way.

 I had hoped to encourage the imaginations  of those on the forum to offer examples of  steampunk, atom punk  or industrial style apartment architecture   or high density city dwellings. To lend  a Utopian or Dystopian  perspective to it

Logged
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2018, 07:59:06 am »

Honestly MS. Annie, I'm not sure that Steampunk has much to say on present day city planning, unless you're willing to argue we are recreating 19th C tenamemts, and then throwing in some dystopian fantasy...

 The general consensus  in NZ, is that the government is harking back to the tenement slum ghetto  that colonists left behind in  the ' old country'.   The  plans show  streets   ultra modern prefab  row housing of 50m2 and tinier. The  current regime seem determined to herd  the populace into tiny  multi dwelling  housing in dystopian  design  of social engineering.

 Put it this way, we have a population of under 5 million in an island nation approximately the land area of Japan.  The population has recently expanded  at a rapid pace through immigration. Nearly a million in the last decade. A 20% increase. We have around 200 000 persons in non secure housing,  including 50 000  living in the street. People are living in sheds, motels,  in vans and tarpaulin  encampments.

 There should be no  cause for the government  to insist  that  everyone should  learn to accept living in high rises of tiny  multi dwelling housing.  The intention is for the housing to be purchased or rented from the state.   The public are  forming  concerns about the  agenda  of the government. It's just not the Kiwi way.

 I had hoped to encourage the imaginations  of those on the forum to offer examples of  steampunk, atom punk  or industrial style apartment architecture   or high density city dwellings. To lend  a Utopian or Dystopian  perspective to it



I think, then that the impetus behind the planning has much less to do with space, than with providing quick (emphasis on the quick), low cost housing and to generate extra revenue from the poor... Or in our case it doesn't even have to be the poor. Packing office space will do as well.

It is unfortunately a common topic nowadays. The powers that be have decided that Austin will stop sprawling horizontally, and are re-zoning various parts of city - including middle class semi-affluent areas, to allow for mixed business and residential construction, i.e. European style residential buildings with commercial businesses on the first floor. The result are these giant "Borg cubes,"  that look like they belong to Communist Era Warsaw Pact countries. It's hard to make the case that we absolutely have to do that now. This is still a smaller city (for the United States) of less than a million people. I suspect it is more about pressure from big developers on local governments, and lining of pockets with money.

As far as Steampunk, perhaps imagine giant pyramid shaped space-frame structure, somewhat patterned after the Eiffel Tower.

A good choice would be a Sierpinsky Fractal:

Imagine this structure adorned with ornate arches like the Eiffel Tower, and Zeppelins flying all around. Sort of like the Steampunk version of Blade Runner's 2019 Los Angeles sky risers. The individual units have prefab triangular walls that you can put up whenever a new residence is built. The rest is just the space frame structure, so you only build the units that you need.


« Last Edit: March 30, 2018, 08:55:06 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2018, 08:43:58 am »

Of course we have all seen the quasi-geodesic home, with prefab triangular panels. The wooden stud structural frame and plywood veneer are all included in each triangular panel.  Nice to look at but very bad use of space owing to the curved walls (human activity is very focused on rectangular items such as bed and furniture). The dome home is more suitable for the suburb and rural areas, where you have an excess of space. Still, the nerd in me would absolutely love to have one of these deep in Colorado's Rocky Mountains, or a desert oasis in the Arizona, my own private Tatooine. Mixing a Wild West existence with a futuristic utopia.






« Last Edit: March 30, 2018, 08:52:21 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2018, 10:35:30 am »



Geometric could be the way to go. One could keep adding on housing segments as needed.  Either a bee hive of  dome combs  or a lace metal place. Imagine living in a penthouse at the tip of the pyramid

 I recently found out a very straight laced girl from school and her older professional parents had lived in a  geodesic dome home. One would never have guessed to know her.

 There are  web sites dedicated to posted images of retro Soviet apartments.  It takes all kinds. There must be some comfort in the utilitarian minimalism
Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2018, 10:53:48 am »


Austin Strategic  Housing... That has a scary ring to it

Shipping container cities  for Haiti


Micro units - Fad or Future
Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2018, 11:08:49 am »

Shudder! I think we may need to resurrect the spirit of Charles Rennie Mackintosh and the rest of the Arts and Craft movement...

Yours,
Miranda.
Logged
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2018, 11:15:27 am »


 I recently found out a very straight laced girl from school and her older professional parents had lived in a  geodesic dome home. One would never have guessed to know her.


I think it's more normal here in America. Not that we have many dome homes to speak of. But I don't think it's viewed as a "wild thing." If anything it's viewed a a "geek thing." Something an old school IBM, Microsoft or Apple engineer might have built in the 70s or 80s. That being said, private home owner's associations in America tend to shun unusual construction like domes, so between certain sizes in urban areas, it's very difficult to build dome homes because neighbours feel it will degrade the value of the real estate. You have to leave the city limit for that. The tide doesn't turn again, until you are among the millionaires, who can afford to pay off the neighbourhood association and build whatever they want. At which point you'll see much wilder things being built. Domes are too quaint for the rich and famous. Except maybe for George Lucas.

You can find dome homes for the middle class in rural/ remote areas, hipster alpine resort areas and politically liberal states. I've never seen one in Austin, though. I think they do exist here, but I always hear from them in states like Washington, Oregon and California.


Austin Strategic  Housing... That has a scary ring to it


We actually call individual zoning changes (for real): "Planned Unit Development" (PUD), and the master city plan is called "Code NEXT."  No joke.  Straight out of the dystopian novel 1984 or the 80's TV show "Max Headroom"
Logged
morozow
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Russian Federation Russian Federation



WWW
« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2018, 03:20:35 pm »


Austin Strategic  Housing... That has a scary ring to it

Shipping container cities  for Haiti


Micro units - Fad or Future



it reminded me of some garages and boathouses in our country. When zealous owners to erect a second floor.



Logged

Sorry for the errors, rudeness and stupidity. It's not me, this online translator. Really convenient?
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2018, 04:52:51 pm »

It is a perennial and recurring problem though; time and time again we find the need to house large numbers of people quickly and affordably comes up.  Most obviously in the UK and Europe post-1945, which put most people off the idea of pre-fab buildings for a very, very long time.  Interestingly budget hotels over here are now returning to the theme; build the bedrooms/ bathrooms offsite in a factory, transport them to site, fit them together and then encase the whole lot in an 'attractive' brick skin. 

It's also starting to creep back into domestic construction in the UK and (I suspect) this trend will not only continue but if anything mushroom in the next few years (background in the UK being that for at least the last decade we've needed to build somewhere around 300,000 houses per year just to keep up with demand as it was back in 2008.  We haven't built anywhere near that number and demand for houses has gone up.  Housebuilders are pushing to build more houses, quicker, and the with the traditional method of construction this means quality has suffered, badly in some cases.  See the much-publicised problems Barratt Homes ran into the last few years- they've since improved but only by slowing down rate of production). 

Pragmatically, whilst I personally adhere to the hairshirt approach of building things by hand and applying a refined sense of aesthetics and craftsmanship to things, when you have issues such as a housing shortage which needs a more immediate answer sometimes the 'ideal' has to take a step back in favour of the 'necessary'.  "What I want" versus "what I need".   
Logged

Persons intending to travel by open carriage should select a seat with their backs to the engine, by which means they will avoid the ashes emitted therefrom, that in travelling generally, but particularly through the tunnels, prove a great annoyance; the carriage farthest from the engine will in consequence be found the most desirable.
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #12 on: March 30, 2018, 05:55:56 pm »

Shudder! I think we may need to resurrect the spirit of Charles Rennie Mackintosh and the rest of the Arts and Craft movement...

Yours,
Miranda.

Dear Miranda T.   Heavens above! Even a small prefab  box should be aesthetic.   Cladding, Texture, colour,  joinery  can be designed to a simple but tasteful  style.  The bright tertiary  colours and redundant eaves and panels cheapen a look and   add to the cost.


 But I guess the proof of the PUD  is in the  the living. Often I wonder  whether the design  teams and planners are  taking the Mick or genuinely  have fixations on a deranged  dream of  creating a total dystopian    city scape - what ever NEXT
« Last Edit: March 30, 2018, 06:43:37 pm by Hurricane Annie » Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #13 on: March 30, 2018, 06:42:19 pm »

 

Mr J Wilhelm,  any  alternative builds in  form of the dome homes, rammed earth, glass, stone, container and other less run of the mill  materials,  are  banished to the  Out Skirts.  To the rural and coastal areas, the isolated hills of the Southern alps. The urban and rural subdivisions have covenants   prohibiting any deviation from a standard plan. Retaining the value of neighbouring  homes  is the prime focus.

 The lifestyle  blocks,  back country stations [ranches],   isolated coastal  enclaves are not  safe from and onslaught of local petitions , years of legal battles and red tape. If they can't do you on the roof  design  , they will go you on the colour. It has to be sympathetic with the environment  and be of  natural hue. As if the cows and the sea gulls really care -

 Petitions  protest from the same people whose grandparents  gave us these NZ   " bach" homes











Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #14 on: April 01, 2018, 05:17:57 am »


This is an interesting concept. Stacked container type prefab.

https://www.busyboo.com/2015/11/24/prefab-apartments-lwpac/





« Last Edit: April 01, 2018, 05:19:45 am by Hurricane Annie » Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #15 on: April 01, 2018, 05:31:25 am »



 Does this one spell profanity?

https://www.google.co.nz/amp/s/www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20150408/washington-heights/second-prefab-apartment-building-set-rise-uptown.amp?source=images

Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #16 on: April 01, 2018, 06:22:54 am »

You can order prefab  modular  pods online and stack them to your hearts content.  










« Last Edit: April 01, 2018, 06:24:42 am by Hurricane Annie » Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #17 on: April 01, 2018, 06:33:00 am »

 
Online prefab tiny home and modules can come in a vintage style, including gothic revival church type design. It wouldn't take much to add a steampunk touch








Logged
von Corax
Squire of the Lambda Calculus
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
Canada Canada

Prof. Darwin Prætorius von Corax


« Reply #18 on: April 01, 2018, 08:58:42 am »

This is not a new concept.


Habitat 67
, in Montreal, QC, was designed by Moshe Safdie for his masters' thesis and built as part of Expo 67 (the 1967 World's Fair.) The project, which has since become an extremely successful co-op, made Safdie's reputation as an architect, "redefined urban living," and completely failed to revolutionize affordable housing or popularize prefabricated modular development.
Logged

By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
By the Beans of Life do my thoughts acquire speed
My hands acquire a shaking
The shaking becomes a warning
By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
The Leverkusen Institute of Paleocybernetics is 5838 km from Reading
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #19 on: April 01, 2018, 09:06:19 am »



Mr Von Corax, that is an intriguing structure. It's lasted the decades   and still looks modern
Logged
Captain
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.


WWW
« Reply #20 on: April 02, 2018, 03:20:07 am »

We need to do something to house people who want homes.  We recently visited Cuba and there is a serious housing shortage (among other things).  Here in Alaska we have a need for affordable seasonal worker housing and micro-homes are helping fill this need especially in Fairbanks and now Haines. 

I have high hopes for 3D printing technology:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GVKtb2TrwRY

Logged

-Karl
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #21 on: April 02, 2018, 06:10:07 am »

We need to do something to house people who want homes.  We recently visited Cuba and there is a serious housing shortage (among other things).  Here in Alaska we have a need for affordable seasonal worker housing and micro-homes are helping fill this need especially in Fairbanks and now Haines. 

I have high hopes for 3D printing technology:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GVKtb2TrwRY



That is groovy.  Totally futuristic for   a deep Arctic   base  and covert operations.  Maybe not in the yellow though.  People would see it
Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #22 on: April 02, 2018, 10:28:15 am »

Cast iron prefabs at the Black Country Living Musem - https://www.bclm.co.uk/items/cast-iron-houses/54.htm; you can't get much more steampunk than cast iron  Wink

Yours,
Miranda.
Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #23 on: April 02, 2018, 11:13:54 am »

This has got me wondering just how far back we can trace pre-fabricated buildings, or at least pre-fabricated permanent structures (which prevents the inevitable joker arguing the toss over whether tents, yurts et al constitute pre-fab buildings).  Certainly there were pre-fabricated iron buildings displayed at the Great Exhibition of 1851, there was a booming trade in pre-fab iron and timber buildings in colonial times and they even made it to Antarctica in the Edwardian era. 

Logged
morozow
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Russian Federation Russian Federation



WWW
« Reply #24 on: April 02, 2018, 05:20:54 pm »

This has got me wondering just how far back we can trace pre-fabricated buildings, or at least pre-fabricated permanent structures (which prevents the inevitable joker arguing the toss over whether tents, yurts et al constitute pre-fab buildings).  Certainly there were pre-fabricated iron buildings displayed at the Great Exhibition of 1851, there was a booming trade in pre-fab iron and timber buildings in colonial times and they even made it to Antarctica in the Edwardian era. 

Whether to consider time of preliminary preparation?

Traditional Russian huts. It is in fact collapsible designs.

They even sold them on the market.

Under Ivan the terrible, Russia competed with the Kazan khanate. It was decided to set up a fortress not far from Kazan.

The main set of living quarters, two churches, fortress walls, 7 towers and gates, in the winter of 1550-1551 was prepared on the Upper Volga in the Uglitsky district.   There is this fortress manufactured, assembled, and then dismantled. And on rafts lowered on the river to the island near Kazan.

 Within 28 days the fortress was erected. When assembling the walls of the preforms was not enough and the case went to the local wood that grew on the hill. The fortifications, covering the top of the Round mountain, represented in terms of the shape of the ellipse. The perimeter of the fortress wall reached 1200 sazhen (1 sazhen about 2 meters). The fortress had several two-or three-tiered towers, of which seven were travel. Christmas, St. Nicholas, St. Sergius, St. Nicholas of Mozhaisk, Gilleskie, Adasheva gates led into the Kremlin, on the territory of which housed temples, administrative and residential buildings.
For military action was built three hiding place: two by the river Sviyaga and one to the river Pike. The main gate was considered Christmas, located on the North-Eastern side of the main entrance. The fortress was named" in the Royal name " by Ivangorod Sviyazhsky (Sviyazhsky).
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.587 seconds with 18 queries.