The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
May 20, 2019, 12:29:55 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: 1 2 3 [4]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: The hat and helmet modification thread  (Read 9145 times)
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #75 on: July 25, 2018, 08:27:29 am »

Following on from my original pith helmet conversion:



Right click and view image to view image in full size (1197 pixels wide)

18v batteries, tin/copper battery box and 12v fan over-volted to provide a good head draught,

I have replaced the faux leather straps and liner for good and solid real leather chin straps and a leather inner liner.

New photos in next post

Wonderful pith helmet Uncle Bert. Have you considered Solid State cooling? A refrigerated hat! And the car is great too!

Uncle Bert's Galvanic Fan Helmet from last page
(Right click to zoom in)


It's great to see the thread developing, keep the hats coming!

~ ~ ~

I see I forgot to take pictures of the finished plume over the Airship Angel hat. I continued applying layers of polyurethane to the plume holder, until it became shiny, and used gold paint to cover the edge of the grey plastic "tee." The whole plume assembly is heavy enough that either you must wear the hat or prop it up from underneath to keep the plume straight, since the hat is very soft and not a helmet.








Nevertheless, keeping the plume holder straight seems to be a common problem, based on pictures of surviving helmets. The plume is exclusively a ceremonial artefact, worn only occasionally, and so it tends to be very fragile, unlike the Prussian spike which was taken into combat.

Original British Household Cavalry Life Guard Parade Helmet with White Plume


The American M1881 Dress Helmet had a particularly flimsy plume holder, which I doubt could withstand a fast gallop, much less battle. American craftsmen, not familiarized with European uniforms, would often invent their own hardware and their own uniform patterns (eg kilts for the New York Volunteer Brigades), resulting in odd, less than standard items - sort of like I did with my Steampunk costume  Tongue.

M1881 US Army, 4th Cavalry Dress Helmet





« Last Edit: July 25, 2018, 08:57:31 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #76 on: July 29, 2018, 11:13:11 am »

Ha! Found the picture.  In another thread, I had talked about a family member of mine on the Italian/Basuqe side being in the Army. He sent to France to study Artillery at the French Military Academy and after returning to Mexico was a Colonel during the Mexican Civil War. He was a professor and eventual director of the Mexican aviation academy


Well, I just found a photograph of someone wearing a Pickelhaube, and guess who it is?  Grin It seems I am justified in my madness  Grin

Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #77 on: August 12, 2018, 06:51:12 am »



 He is very handsome in his helmet.  Fate works in mysterious ways. There are many curious Co incidences in life
Logged
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #78 on: August 12, 2018, 11:12:43 pm »



 He is very handsome in his helmet.  Fate works in mysterious ways. There are many curious Co incidences in life
He must have been very young in that picture with the Pickelhaube. The helmets were discontinued right after the start of the Mexican Civil War (Revolución) in 1910
Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #79 on: August 13, 2018, 11:08:10 am »



 He is very handsome in his helmet.  Fate works in mysterious ways. There are many curious Co incidences in life
He must have been very young in that picture with the Pickelhaube. The helmets were discontinued right after the start of the Mexican Civil War (Revolución) in 1910

 Possibly in his early mid 20s, by the looks
Logged
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #80 on: August 16, 2018, 09:21:58 pm »



 He is very handsome in his helmet.  Fate works in mysterious ways. There are many curious Co incidences in life
He must have been very young in that picture with the Pickelhaube. The helmets were discontinued right after the start of the Mexican Civil War (Revolución) in 1910

 Possibly in his early mid 20s, by the looks

That blurry document above is from a Facebook page - an aviation history group (https://es-la.facebook.com/aviaciomilitarmexicana/photos/o.158859000857968/1471109229581846). It reads Gustavo Bazan-Cañamar was born in 1887, so at age 18 it would be 1905, where he'd be old enough to be conscripted into the army.

President Porfirio Diaz' tenure was very long (he was a dictator). And according to a Pickelhauben website (EDIT: Apparently the website was taken off-line) the spike helmets were only worn for a very brief period, bewteen 1905 and 1910 as part of formal dress uniforms (not battle - The Prussians, other Germans plus Chilean and Peruvian forces did get to wear them in battle). So he'd be in the precise period to wear that helmet as a cadet.

The revolution started in 1910, but it reads in that 5 year span before the war he was sent to France to study artillery (which I knew from my family's accounts).

Mexican Pickelhauben - made in Prussia for the Mexican Army (1905-1910)
You can see the Mexican coat of arms, an eagle perched on a cactus eating a snake
Aztec myth of origin, the Nahua Mexica people should settle at a place where an eagle was found eating a snake.
They found it on an island in the midle of Lake Texcoco on June 20, 1325 - renamed it Tenochtitlan.
The Spanish renamed it "Mexico-Tenochtitlan" or "The City of Mexico" in 1521
« Last Edit: August 16, 2018, 10:19:26 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Pages: 1 2 3 [4]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.254 seconds with 16 queries.