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Author Topic: The Nautilus - Styrene Steampunk  (Read 3876 times)
keithjones
Gunner
**
United States United States



« on: June 10, 2017, 03:13:26 am »

I cleared my modeling bench for this kit - finally a kit I DON'T have to add rivets!



The manufacturer is Pegasus, but I've read that it's actually Trumpeter.  I was pleasantly surprised by the engineering of this kit; if only their car models were this good.


I realize the interior may be obstructed by the window, but I detail painted it anyway. 

A view of the sofa and organ:


The sofa, globe, and desk:


These details will probably be obscured after the windows are installed.  The frame of the windows need to be painted, so the panes need to be masked.

Before:


68 masks and 50 minutes later:



I'll continue posting work in progress photos...





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Drew P
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2017, 04:26:57 am »

Cool, do they offer any photo-etched pieces for this?
What are the dimensions?
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keithjones
Gunner
**
United States United States



« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2017, 05:03:01 am »

Cool, do they offer any photo-etched pieces for this?
What are the dimensions?

There's a rather daunting sheet of photo-etch included.  I'm not looking forward to it; the pieces for grab handles are tiny and I think I'll be feeding the gremlin who's eaten some of my other photo-etch pieces.

The approximate length is 13 inches (33 cm), 3 inches high (7.6 cm), and 3 inches wide (7.6 cm).
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Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2017, 12:08:28 pm »

That looks like a lovely kit, made extra special by your detailed construction of it; I am sure the completed artifact will be something special to see. In terms of the window, might it be possible to make the entire structure removable to allow a better view of the interior?

Yours,
Miranda.
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James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2017, 12:36:20 pm »

I've always wanted this kit; been sorely tempted to buy it whenever I'm at Ian Allan's in Birmingham; but the price puts me off somewhat.  Also the small matter of the rainy day project stash pile that keeps getting bigger.  I'll be watching with interest. 
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keithjones
Gunner
**
United States United States



« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2017, 02:37:37 am »

That looks like a lovely kit, made extra special by your detailed construction of it; I am sure the completed artifact will be something special to see. In terms of the window, might it be possible to make the entire structure removable to allow a better view of the interior?

Yours,
Miranda.

Thanks, that's a great idea!  There are enough seams around the window that making the windows removable would work well.  Unfortunately, I've reached the point of no return - but if anyone else is building this kit they could (and should) incorporate your idea. 
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keithjones
Gunner
**
United States United States



« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2017, 02:43:32 am »

I've always wanted this kit; been sorely tempted to buy it whenever I'm at Ian Allan's in Birmingham; but the price puts me off somewhat.  Also the small matter of the rainy day project stash pile that keeps getting bigger.  I'll be watching with interest. 

It's fairly expensive in the States, mine had been opened and I picked it up on EBay for a price that didn't require handing over my paycheck.  I take it Ian Allen's is a brick and mortar hobby shop?  Hobby shops seem to be going the way of the Dodo and Passenger Pigeon...
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keithjones
Gunner
**
United States United States



« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2017, 02:56:21 am »

I made some more progress with the Nautilus.  I think that, for this kit, 90% of the completion will take 10% of the time, the remaining 10% will take 90% of the time.

The tail and one of the "eyes" are tacked in; I'll be painting them separately.




Spoiler (click to show/hide)
Spoiler (click to show/hide)






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James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #8 on: June 11, 2017, 10:47:58 am »

I made some more progress with the Nautilus.  I think that, for this kit, 90% of the completion will take 10% of the time, the remaining 10% will take 90% of the time.

The tail and one of the "eyes" are tacked in; I'll be painting them separately.




Spoiler (click to show/hide)
Spoiler (click to show/hide)



Looks great!  As you say, it looks to be one of those kits where it all goes together in a few hours and then the last few bits take weeks. 

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
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Drew P
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #9 on: June 11, 2017, 02:21:36 pm »

Thanks for the info, Keithjones!
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Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia



« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2017, 05:54:51 pm »

Liking this! If I didn't have so many other projects lined up and on the go I'd be sorely tempted to get something like this, and really steampunk it up a bit!
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keithjones
Gunner
**
United States United States



« Reply #11 on: June 14, 2017, 05:23:24 am »

Added photoetch and assorted other small bits. 




The photoetch didn't give me as much trouble as I thought it would; folding the stairs was probably the hardest part.  I had considered using ladders instead of the stairs, but after I got them straightened out they looked pretty good.  I'm not going to attempt to straighten the guard rail until I'm finished with it.





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mizzarrogh
Gunner
**
Sweden Sweden


« Reply #12 on: June 18, 2017, 02:40:46 pm »

I had newer seen this particular wersion before, i must say that i realy love to watch this come to life, i red all those books when i was a kid, the original Nautilus where as i remember wery different from the one in the movie, so i think there are no actual right or wrong about how to design a Nautilus inspired project.
Personally i love this concept wery much!
When i was a kid i even started to make a cartoon based on my own fantasy figureas inspired by those books.

Fun fact is that a small, drop-shaped sea crawler with steelwheels that could drive around to explore the bottom of the sea (as i remember from the picture it was steam driven in some form) , was constructed in the 1800 and was named "Argonauta" probably after the diskusion around Captain Nemo in those books...

(Sorry for my English...)






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RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
*****


« Reply #13 on: June 18, 2017, 04:44:05 pm »

Depictions of the Nautilus seem to vary from a very bland cigar shape, to Disney's familiar design, to the florid design from Alan Moore's comics. This model seems well thought out and not too derivative of other designs.
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Newchurch
Snr. Officer
****
England England


WWW
« Reply #14 on: June 18, 2017, 11:02:12 pm »

I had newer seen this particular wersion before, i must say that i realy love to watch this come to life, i red all those books when i was a kid, the original Nautilus where as i remember wery different from the one in the movie, so i think there are no actual right or wrong about how to design a Nautilus inspired project.
Personally i love this concept wery much!
When i was a kid i even started to make a cartoon based on my own fantasy figureas inspired by those books.

Fun fact is that a small, drop-shaped sea crawler with steelwheels that could drive around to explore the bottom of the sea (as i remember from the picture it was steam driven in some form) , was constructed in the 1800 and was named "Argonauta" probably after the diskusion around Captain Nemo in those books...

(Sorry for my English...)








There is a model of Argonaut in the Submarine Museum in Gosport (near Portsmouth, UK).  (Image in the spoiler.)

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
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mizzarrogh
Gunner
**
Sweden Sweden


« Reply #15 on: June 20, 2017, 04:14:04 pm »

Thx for posting that photo, if i am not wrong, someone also built a modern, functional replica of it (Probably it was Mr Doug from SV seeker?).

(Sorry for drifting a bit off topic, but this Argonaut thing always show up in my head when someone talk about Nautilus and captain Nemo, beccuse of that diskussion about the name in a dialog in the book...)

As i remember someone was building a wery large, manned model of the Nautilus from the movie and they found out that the design was suprisingly well working even in the sea. So, this actually seems to be a good and suprisingly well working design even for a real submarine (wich, as i remember, even suprised the designers a bit).

Edit, Now i am tempted to re shape it to a side carried, exploring wehicle for my fantasy nautilus... I think they had been a great couple! Smiley


« Last Edit: June 20, 2017, 08:01:19 pm by mizzarrogh » Logged
mizzarrogh
Gunner
**
Sweden Sweden


« Reply #16 on: June 20, 2017, 04:22:50 pm »

It seems to hawe been more then one Argonaut, this was the one i saw pictures of in a book when i was a little kid:
http://www.submarine-history.com/NOVAargonaut.jpg

Edit, i accidentaly wrote Nautilus, i ment Argonaut I.

(That thing in the background is actually "Plunger", an early experimental Holland submarine, i think maybe Holland V?, i guess Nautilus is loosly based on Hollands Concept drawings, since i know Jules Verne said that he did lot of reserach in warious scientic litterature when hi wrote the books.)

« Last Edit: June 20, 2017, 08:07:41 pm by mizzarrogh » Logged
keithjones
Gunner
**
United States United States



« Reply #17 on: June 21, 2017, 05:10:37 am »

After too many days of humid and/or rainy weather, I was able to get some paint on the Nautilus.



I first painted it with black auto primer, followed by Testor's Gloss Copper, then Tamiya Smoke.  All are spray cans.




Removing the approximately 120 window masks took almost as long as applying them. As I feared, detail painting the interior was an exercise in futility.  At least the sofa is almost visible.


There is still more photoetch and other details to add, plus some weathering.

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RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
*****


« Reply #18 on: June 21, 2017, 05:29:34 am »

You need an internal light source for that interior.
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Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia



« Reply #19 on: June 21, 2017, 02:19:20 pm »

Looking good, Mr Jones!
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keithjones
Gunner
**
United States United States



« Reply #20 on: June 22, 2017, 01:46:12 am »

You need an internal light source for that interior.

Correct!  There's an aftermarket lighting kit, enhanced photoetch, and even MORE involved window masking kit(s) out there.  I'll always have my memories (and photos) of the interior.
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Antipodean
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #21 on: June 22, 2017, 09:56:24 am »

Quote
As I feared, detail painting the interior was an exercise in futility
You know it is there, we know its there.
I have plans to purchase this model at some stage and I am thinking of placing a small cctv camera looking into the cabin so I can show off the detail I plan to place in there.

Enjoying your posts!
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keithjones
Gunner
**
United States United States



« Reply #22 on: June 29, 2017, 05:53:11 am »

The kit supplies a stone base and squid for displaying the Nautilus.  I wanted something different, so I thought I'd go for an (almost) dry dock diorama, with the sub sitting in a cradle-like structure.

The end pieces of the cradle were constructed from Evergreen and Plastruct  styrene.  The rivets are decals from Micromark; they make riveting much easier.  The letters are HO scale and are made by Vector Cut.  The first job my great-great grandfather had was at the Crane Iron Works in Catasauqua, PA, hence the "CRANE" name.



I wanted to tie the end pieces with trusses, but didn't like the looks of "wave" pattern of the Plastruct trusses.  By removing the lip of two the pieces and then gluing them, I was able to make a more pleasing (at least to my eye) cross pattern.



Finally, a rough version of how the display should look.  I added some more of the kit-supplied photo etch to the tail, and started weathering.






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keithjones
Gunner
**
United States United States



« Reply #23 on: July 07, 2017, 02:10:49 am »

I finally finished weathering the Nautilus and the base - I'm calling it done.  With the exception of the window masks, it was an enjoyable build.



The gears and other bits are watch parts.



Some more views:

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Now on to something completely different (like a '57 Chevy or a Golf rat rod...)
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annevpreussen
Gunner
**
United States United States


Captain Annemarie of the Eagle's Arrow Airship


« Reply #24 on: July 08, 2017, 04:01:35 am »

Oh, Mr. Jones, I think I'm in love! I would die to come aboard that beautiful ship. Thank you so much for sharing it with us!
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